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COVID-19 cases and deaths continue to decline

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A volunteer carer called Trinity is working in a COVID-19 field hospital in Nasrec, Johannesburg. IMF/James Oatway

The number of COVID-19 cases and deaths has continued to decline globally, with  3.1 million new cases and just over 54,000 new deaths, reported over the last week, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). 

Compared to the previous week, this represents a nine per cent decrease in cases, while deaths remained similar, the WHO said in its weekly epidemiological update. This continues the trend that has been observed since August.  

During the week of 27 September to 3 October, all regions reported a decline in the number of new cases, apart from Europe which remained similar to the week before. 

The largest decrease in new weekly cases was reported in Africa (43 per cent), followed by the Eastern Mediterranean (21 per cent), Southeast Asia (19 per cent), the Americas (12 per cent) and the Western Pacific (12 per cent). 

4.8 million deaths 

The number of confirmed cases reported globally is now over 234 million, with fatalities just under 4.8 million.  

A large decline in the number of new weekly deaths was also reported for all regions, except the Americas and Europe. These regions both reported a similar number of weekly deaths as the previous week. 

The largest decline in weekly deaths was reported from Africa, with a 25 per cent decline, compared with the previous week. 

According to the update, the regions reporting the highest weekly case incidence rates per 100,000 population were Europe (123.1 new cases per 100,000) and the Americas (109.5 new cases per 100,000), while the same two regions reported this highest weekly incidence in deaths per 100,000 population; the Americas (2.4 new cases per 100,000) and Europe (1.6 new cases per 100,000). 

US leads new cases 

The highest numbers of new cases were reported from the United States (760,571), the United Kingdom (239,781 new cases; similar to the number reported in the previous week), Turkey (197,277 new cases; similar to the number reported in the previous week), the Russian Federation (165,623 new cases; 13 per cent increase), and India (161,158 new cases; a 21 per cent decrease). 

Globally, the report found that cases of the Alpha variant have been reported in 195 countries, territories or areas (two new countries added since last week), while 145 countries (3 new countries since last week) have reported cases of the Beta variant; and 99 countries have reported cases of the Gamma variant (4 new countries since last week). 

The Delta variant has been reported in 192 countries (seven new countries since last week) across all six WHO regions, as of 5 October. 

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Health & Wellness

Omicron: Don’t panic but prepare for likely spread

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As scientists continue to investigate the Omicron COVID-19 variant, the UN World Health Organization (WHO) on Friday urged countries not to panic but to prepare for its likely spread.

Heralding South Africa’s and Botswana’s decision to report the appearance of the Omicron coronavirus mutation last month, the UN health agency repeated that it will take another two weeks before more is known about how transmissible and how dangerous it actually is.

Speaking in Geneva, WHO spokesperson Christian Lindmeier stressed that data suggesting that Omicron was highly transmissible was only preliminary.

Unnecessary travel bans

He also repeated WHO advice against blanket travel bans, except for countries whose health systems were unable to withstand a surge in infections.

“It is much more preferred to prepare your country, your health system to possibly incoming cases because we can be pretty sure that this Omicron variant will spread around,” he said.

The Delta mutation – declared a variant of concern this summer – is now “predominant”, Mr. Lindmeier added, “with over 90 per cent all around the world. This is how this virus behaves and we will not most likely be able to keep it out of individual countries.”

The WHO official also cautioned against knee-jerk reactions to reports that Omicron had continued to spread.

“Let’s not get deterred right now, let us first get as much information as possible to make the correct risk assessment based on the information that we will have and then let’s move on,” he said.

“Let’s not get completely worried or confused by individual information which are all individually important, but which need to be brought together in order to assess together.”

Surge team for South Africa spike

The development comes as WHO said that it was sending a technical surge team to South Africa’s Gauteng province to monitor Omicron and help with contract tracing, amid a spike in coronavirus reinfections.

For the seven days leading to 30 November, South Africa reported a 311 per cent increase in new cases, compared with the previous seven days, WHO said on Thursday.

Cases in Gauteng province, where Johannesburg is located, have increased by 375 per cent week on week. Hospital admissions there rose 4.2 per cent in the past seven days from the previous week. And COVID-19-related deaths in the province jumped 28.6 per cent from the previous seven days.

Announcing the surge team deployment, Dr Salam Gueye, WHO Regional Emergency Director for Africa, noted that just 102 million Africans in Africa – 7.5 per cent of the continental population – are now fully vaccinated and that more than 80 per cent of the population has not received even a single dose. “This is a dangerously wide gap,” he said.

In a statement, WHO said that South Africa is reportedly seeing more patients contracting COVID-19 after having already been infected, in a way it did not with previous variants, citing a microbiologist from the country’s National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD).

Working with African governments to accelerate studies and bolster the response to the new variant, the World Health Organization (WHO) is urging countries to sequence between 75 and 150 samples weekly.

Detection ‘bought the world time’

The detection and timely reporting of the new variant by Botswana and South Africa has bought the world time,” said Dr Matshidiso Moeti, WHO Regional Director for Africa.

“We have a window of opportunity but must act quickly and ramp up detection and prevention measures. Countries must adjust their COVID-19 response and stop a surge in cases from sweeping across Africa and possibly overwhelming already-stretched health facilities.”

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Best Extracurricular & After-School Activities to Reduce Stress

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Being a student is a fun and exciting experience. However, it is also tightly connected with constant stresses. The lack of free time, stressful exams, tight deadlines – these and other challenges often make students’ lives unbearable and lead to various health issues. And, unfortunately, there is no way to eliminate stress from your college life completely.

So, since stress is an integral part of a student’s life, are there any ways to ease it? Living in a constant state of stress is definitely not an option. But, luckily, there are ways to prevent and reduce stress. One way to do this is to do my essay cheap and take a break from your academic issues. But, there is also another way.

In this article, we have collected the top seven activities that are proven to reduce stress levels and can help students survive in their intensive, busy college lives.

1.      Meditation

Meditation is one of the most widely known stress relief activities. Even a 10-minute session can provide you with short-term stress relief, and, apart from this, mediation is proven to deliver long-term stress management benefits too.

So, if you are feeling tired and anxious, try meditating. There are plenty of different practices, so everyone should find something to suit their needs. Be sure to give it a try.

2.      Sports

Another activity students can try to improve overall well-being and get rid of stress is any kind of sport. Doing sports regularly will keep you fit and provide a long list of physical and mental health benefits, including stress relief.

If you are wondering how to get started, the easiest way to make sports a part of your everyday life in college is to join one of your school’s sports teams. It can be anything that feels right for you. The only thing to keep in mind is that being on a team will most likely take lots of your free time. So, if you don’t want your academic performance to drop, you might need to enlist the help of DoMyEssay to have someone who can take care of your assignments in any situation.

3.      Arts

For decades, different forms of art were considered to be effective stress-relievers. Not without reason, psychologists often use art therapy as a tool to help patients cope with a variety of mental health issues. And, the good news is that you don’t even need to go to a therapist to feel the positive effects of art on your well-being.

To try this activity, choose a form of art that suits you best. It can be anything from coloring a coloring book to painting or making music. Try different options to find what works for you and devote at least a bit of time a day to your art therapy, and soon, you will notice the first positive effects.

4.      Yoga

We’ve already told you that sports and meditations are good for your mental health. Yet, yoga deserves to be a separate point on our list because it has a bit of both. Regardless of the chosen type of yoga, such practices are all about breathing, meditating, and finding a balance. All these things are powerful in terms of stress relief.

In addition to this, yoga is known to boost mood. So, if you feel like you are lacking tranquility and a feeling of happiness, be sure to try practicing yoga. We bet that once you get used to it, you will never want to go back.

5.      Dancing

The next after-school activity that can boost your mood and reduce stress is dancing. This activity involves two powerful stress-relievers – music and physical activity. Together they can have an effect much more powerful than anything else.

Want to give it a try? It is easy to get started. Try joining some dance classes or, if you don’t have much free time, just dance at home like no one is watching. One way or another, the benefits will be felt straight away.

6.      Stretching

Stretching your body is one more activity that will boost your well-being. According to numerous studies, physical flexibility is closely interlinked with mental flexibility. Therefore, stretching is known to reduce tension, help fight anxiety, reduce stress and depression, and trigger positive emotions.

Just like in the case with other activities we’ve mentioned in this article, stretching can be done right at home. All you need is a bit of free time, some soothing music, and a knowledge of some basic exercises. However, if you have time to join a stretching class, it would be even better because this way, you will also get an additional opportunity to socialize, which is also good for your well-being.

7.      Crafting

Different types of crafting are also good for fighting stress. Whether it is knitting, needlework, ceramics, or any other activity, it will definitely bring its benefits as long as you are enjoying the process.

The key trick here is to get distracted from your daily routine and get deeply involved in doing something creative. Just like it is in the case of arts, connecting with your creative side with the help of crafting can help you prevent and cope with a variety of mental health issues.

To Sum Up

So, now you know about the top seven most stress-relieving activities that you can do after studies to boost mood and ensure overall well-being. All you need to do is to find the best option for you and make it a part of your life!

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Left Ventricular Aneurysm Surgery

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A heart aneurysm is a serious illness that causes impairment of the contractile activity of the affected area of the heart muscle. Most often such pathology develops in the wall of the left ventricle of the heart. The disease more often affects men over the age of 40. Aneurysm detected in the heart grows only up to a certain size, but always requires surgical treatment.

Treatment for left ventricular aneurysm

Today physicians cope with heart aneurysms only by surgery. This is the only effective method that can completely cure a patient. Medication therapy is only used to temporarily improve the condition of patients with left ventricular aneurysms. If a patient is diagnosed with a left ventricular aneurysm, urgent surgical treatment is prescribed in the presence of the following indications:

  • Severe heart rhythm abnormalities
  • Formation of a blood clot in the aneurysm
  • Rapidly developing heart failure
  • Aneurysm rupture

Surgical treatment of acute and subacute heart aneurysms is indicated in the rapid progression of heart failure and the threat of aneurysmatic sac rupture. In chronic cardiac aneurysm, surgery is performed to prevent thromboembolic complications and for myocardial revascularization.

As a palliative intervention, strengthening of the aneurysm wall with polymeric materials is resorted to. Radical operations include ventricular aneurysm resection (if necessary – with subsequent reconstruction of the myocardial wall).

How is the surgical treatment carried out?

During this procedure, the patient’s chest is opened and the blood flow through the heart is stopped. A special device is attached to the main vessels, which continues to maintain the pumping function while the heart remains inactive. Only then a surgeon removes the aneurysm. Vascular bypass is also performed, if necessary. After a cardiac aneurysm is excised, the treatment process is not over. After the operation, it is necessary to stay under the supervision of healthcare professionals, because there is a risk of complications.

In a post-traumatic aneurysm of the heart, the heart wall is sutured. If additional revascularizing intervention is necessary, aneurysm resection with CABG are performed simultaneously.

In the preoperative period, patients with a left ventricular aneurysm receive cardiac glycosides, anticoagulants, hypotensive drugs, and oxygen therapy.

As a rule, small left ventricular aneurysms do not require special methods of repair after the procedure. The defect after aneurysmectomy can be closed by a simple linear suture, which is effective and the most suitable option for such situations.

After left ventricular aneurysmectomy and possible plasty, the development of low ejection syndrome, repeated myocardial infarction, arrhythmias (paroxysmal tachycardia, atrial fibrillation), suture failure and bleeding, respiratory failure, renal failure, cerebral thromboembolism is possible.

Is it worth going abroad for treatment during a lockdown?

All of the above conditions pose a serious threat to a person’s life, so the start of treatment should not be delayed. Left ventricular aneurysm surgery should only be performed by an experienced physician because it is a very complex intervention. And the absence of timeliness and quality of the intervention becomes the reason why people go abroad to treat left ventricular aneurysms.

You might think that it isn’t worth jumping straight into it in the middle of a lockdown. But if you need to go abroad for treatment, you can. Yes, you may need to wait a bit longer to get a visa, but it also doesn’t have to be that way.

Booking Health knows all of the ways to organize the left ventricular aneurysm surgery as soon as possible. The company will help you to get a visa if you’re applying for the first time or if your request has been declined. Booking Health will also help you choose a hospital that suits your preferences, prepare all the necessary documentation, book the flight tickets and accommodation, and will do every single treatment-related thing for you.

For Booking Health to help you, please, leave a request on the official website, and a medical advisor will contact you.

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