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Destigmatizing Sexual Assault Conversations in Pakistan

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On 7 September 2020, a woman was gang-raped in front of her children on the Lahore-Sialkot motorway. The incident sparked a public outrage amongst the populace of Pakistan, with calls for public hangings. Though initially the conviction process was drenched in victim-blaming and incompetence, recently, the Lahore anti-terrorism court (ATC) sentenced the abusers to death and life imprisonment. Yet, little influence has been witnessed in the sexual assault ratio of Pakistan, since deterioration in cases has not been observed. Proving how, despite calls of public-hangings, the womenfolk of Pakistan is unsafe.

The uncanny essence of Pakistani society is that women are under the consistent menace of sexual assault, yet there is a persistent disgrace affiliated with initiating conversations penetrating towards its prevention. The traces of this stigma can be associated with misinterpreting religious texts and deep-rooted exploitative cultural norms. However, there is a critical need for destigmatizing sexual assault conversations; as prevention-orientated strategies can be discussed and implemented by adolescent females. With ignorance on such topics, they are subject to predators cashing on their vulnerability and absence of awareness.

Pakistan emerged on the grounds of providing Muslims and remaining deprived minorities of British India with a homeland, that would embark upon their fundamental human rights. Despite these critical obligations, unfortunately, the state of Pakistan has floundered to shelter its female adolescent population against sexual assault. Thus, undermining their human rights. According to Sahil’s 2019 annual report, approximately 10 children are sexually assaulted in Pakistan on a daily basis. In addition, it was acquired that 22,000 cases of child sexual abuse have been reported in the last 6 years. Scarily enough, these statistics are unrepresentative of Pakistan’s legitimate sexual abuse ratio. Since, thousands of cases go unreported due to factors such as victim-blaming, police corruption, and societal pressure. Henceforth, it is acute to take substantive measures for the creation of a safer environment for the youth of Pakistan.

The harsh reality is that; harassment threats directly challenge the potential of young Pakistani girls. Numerous individuals refuse to procure education and execute jobs due to the realm of harassment possibility; as, harassers can linger in the form of professors, employers, religious teachers, and numerous other possibilities. With that said, changing the mindset of a conservative society, and educating potential rapists can be a slow and gradual process. Public hangings are exceedingly inefficient too, there is underreporting of data, and police corruption prevails widely. Henceforth, it is crucial to generate preventive conversations with adolescents at a young age. The fact of the matter is that children can encounter predators in any form and at any point in their life span. As a result, they should be trained to identify predators, speak up, and take the necessary action against them. Since corresponding propositions are principally stigmatized in Pakistani society by extremist religious scholars, their incorporation in the school syllabus is highly unlikely. Thus, they should be introduced at every house level by the parents or guardians of the respected individuals.

As a part of this process, young girls should be presented with the notion of the “bad touch”. Accordingly, they should be taught to contact their parents following encountering an inappropriate touch. It should also be established in their minds that, such actions can be undertaken by anyone, including relatives, house servants, teachers, and religious teachers. Adding on, adolescent females should be empowered and granted the power to say “no” to inappropriate actions. This also includes respecting the individual’s will to not interact with specific family members, and not forcing them to do so. As it is likely that they undertook inappropriate conduct against the child in the parents’ or guardians’ absence. In addition to this, children are often threatened into secret-keeping from their families by predators. Accordingly, parents or guardians should establish certain ground rules, due to which the child will be bound to share every slight detail and encounter with them, even if the information is disguised as a secret by someone. With that said, under the context of Pakistan, adolescent females carry fears regarding sharing information on such topics with members of their family. The associated reason is the taboo against sexual assault, and fears regarding victim-blaming by their own family. Therefore, it should be affirmed that the adolescents will not be encountered with trouble for sharing such information. Lastly, parents should make a point to listen to their children when they are approached by them. In fact, they should be showered with complete attention and their concerns should be engaged with seriously. Consequently, adolescent females will acquire the concept that their voices are being heard, and will be more likely to seek help while encountering sexual assault attempts.

The motorway rape incident, Zainab Amin Ansari’s case, and countless other encounters of rape still haunt the people of Pakistan. Despite public outrages and the public hanging of Zainab’s abuser, no significant decline was identified in the sexual abuse ratio of the state. Similarly, little change is expected with the public hanging of the motorway convicts too. Countless girls are molested on a daily basis; yet, little action is undertaken by the government of Pakistan. As a result, it is essential for the population to take matters into their own hands and introduce prevention-orientated conversations with their children. At the end of the day, it all comes down to awareness. Education on such topics allows adolescent females to identify molestation attempts and take actions to ensure their safety.

However, with that said, it is also crucial to have such conversations with the male population of Pakistan at a young age. In this manner, the development of potential molesters can be prevented and our female population can be protected. Conversely, although altering the wide-ranging mindset is a challenging and time-consuming process, initiation paves the path towards attaining that ultimate goal. Henceforth, in order to ensure substantial change, there is a dire need for destigmatizing sexual assault conversations at all levels of Pakistani society. Surely, Pakistan will experience better days with respect to its alarmingly high sexual assault ratio; however, a collective effort is critical to achieving that milestone.

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New Social Compact

Prevent gender-based violence in humanitarian emergencies

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Top UN officials met in the margins of the 76th General Assembly on Thursday,  with a strong call to action to stamp out gender-based violence (GBV), amid a rise in forced displacement and other humanitarian emergencies around the globe.

GBV includes acts that inflict physical, sexual or mental harm – or other forms of suffering, coercion and limits on personal freedoms – and has “long-term consequences on the sexual, physical and psychological health of survivors”, according to the UN’s sexual and reproductive health agency (UNFPA).

These are being driven increasingly by conflict, climate change, famine and insecurity, heightening vulnerabilities for girls and women.

‘Willingness to act’

UNFPA Executive Director Natalia Kanem told the meeting on Localizing GBV in humanitarian crises, that peace, justice and dignity are the “birthright of every woman and girl”.

She spoke of the agency’s “clear and ambitious” 2021-2025 Roadmap, which reflects a shared vision and underscored the need to create new pathways to ensure those rights.

Emphasizing the need for accountability “to ourselves and each other”, Ms. Kanem said that as the lead UN agency on the issue, “UNFPA is committed to standing strong”.

She said there was a strong will to act, “to do something about gender-based violence”, she added, stressing the importance of putting the voices of women “at the heart of what we do”

Ms. Kanem pledged to funnel 43 per cent of UNFPA’s humanitarian funding to national and local women’s organizations, saying “now more than ever, they need us”.

Afghanistan: ‘Important reminder’

Emergency Relief Coordinator Martin Griffiths called the situation in Afghanistan “an important reminder of the primary vulnerability of women and girls in crises”.

He highlighted the vital role of women-led local communities, pointing out that they act as first responders to crisis.

Recalling a recent trip to Ethiopia, where he heard first-hand accounts of the traumas suffered by women in Tigray, he said that it was the local communities who first responded to the atrocities, which underscores the “absolute importance” of listening to women, protecting women and girls, and “protecting local communities to do what they naturally want to do”.

The protection of women is one of the least-funded parts of the humanitarian programme, Mr. Griffiths said.

Getting the word out

Henrietta Fore, Executive Director of the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF), said to deliver on “the ambitious call to action”, it is important to “get the word out” to the girls and women on the ground about the services available.

“This has not been clear at all”, Ms. Fore stated.

She spoke of the UNICEF report We Must Do Better, which provides a global feminist assessment of the experiences of women and girls, and the organizations they lead, during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The report highlighted that the needs of women and girls are either ignored or treated as an afterthought; and that despite being on the front lines of humanitarian crises, women are not taken seriously enough.

And although the demand for GBV services has increased during COVID, the resources have not, said Ms. Fore, calling for greater support for local women’s groups, including financially.

Bureaucratizing assistance

Fighting GBV is an important priority for the UN refugee agency (UNHCR), High Commissioner Filippo Grandi assured participants, especially in situations of forced displacements, which are “rife” with opportunities.

He acknowledged that during humanitarian crises as everyone is moving quickly, too often the critical role of local women’s organizations are overlooked.

The top UNHCR official said that providing “substantive, flexible, direct and rapid” resources to women-led, community-based organizations without undue red tape is “one of the most important” ways to empower them.

He conceded however, “this is a difficult call” as humanitarian funding is follow the trend of being “bureaucratized”.

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New Social Compact

The Death News of Sidharth Shukla: In the remembrance of Sidnaaz

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For most individuals, the death news of Sidharth Shukla seems implausible. Sidharth Shukla, popular actor, and 13 winner Bigg Boss died on Thursday 2 September suffering a severe cardiac arrest at Cooper Hospital in Mumbai.  Actor Sidharth constantly challenged the odds in his profession. For many in the TV and movie sector, it is a last-ditch and sometimes fruitless effort to stop a slide into irrelevance in the popular reality program Bigg Boss. But Shukla was the household name that became a feather reality TV sensation for himself who won the 13th show edition in 2019. For the first time, Shukla entered the television limelight, working on BalikaVadhu (2012), in which he tried the part of District Collector Shivraj Shekhar. Shukla portrayed the character throughout the space of three years and won several accolades. A few whiles later, in Humpty Sharma Ki Dulhania (2014), he was reputed to a costar, once again receiving acclaim. Born and reared up in Mumbai, Shukla began as a model by taking a position as a leader in the Manhunt and Mega model Gladrags contests and then starred in Bajaj and ICICI Banking television commercial campaigns. Shortly thereafter, he premiered on Babul Ka Aangann Chootey Na, followed by a range of dramatic TV shows such as CID and Aahat, which include criminal dramas. In 2016 Khatron Ke Khiladi won Fear Factor as well. Shukla has also been a popular television host with such series as Savdhaan India and the Got Talent 6 of India. His death caused a shock to the television and film industries.

Police authorities in Mumbai claimed that at around 9 a.m. before death, Shukla complained about cardiac pressure in his home in Oshivara, Mumbai.  At that time, his sister, his mother, and brother-in-law were in the house. A physician who came to the house found that he was pulseless. “The family went to Dr. RN Cooper hospital and requested an ambulance. They reached about 9.45 am and before admission he had been proclaimed dead.” The Forensic department leader, Dr. R Sukhdev, verified that on Thursday morning, Shukla was brought dead. The afternoon postmortem exam was performed. No external damage on his body was detected before the autopsy by physicians and police. The Dean of Dr. RN Cooper Hospital, Dr. Sailesh Mohite, refused to comment on the autopsy findings.

Many Celebertities Condolences

“Siddharth, gone too soon. You’ll be missed…” said Actor Salman Khan, who gave him the trophy of Bigg Boss. Kapil Sharma TV comedy host tweeted, “Oh god, it is truly shocking, my condolences to the family, and prayers for the the departed soul” Several TV and film fraternity members, like Rajkummar Rao, came to Mumbai to pay their final honors in Shukla Residence. On Friday his last rites will be conducted.

Shehnaaz Gill on Sidharth Shukla death

Sources close to the actor and individuals who went to his house and told Sidharth Shukla’s family that Shehnaaz is in a condition of shock and cannot cope with his loss today. Source further stated Shehnaaz was deeply impacted by the untimely death of the Balika Vadhu actor. Shehnaaz was very near to Sidharth, and she frequently publicly demonstrated her affection for him. Her compassion and caring for him never shied away. She said she was even in love with him openly. Fans liked their duo much after BB 13, and invented their moniker with affection, Sidnaaz. In two recent programs, Back-to-Back Bigg Boss OTT and Dances Deewane 3, the reported couple had featured.

Sidharth Shukla breathed his last in Shehnaaz Gill’s arms

Sidharth was still complaining of discomfort, and Shehnaaz and his mother begged him to relax. Sidharth was unable to sleep, on the other hand; thus Shehnaaz was requested to remain with him and pat on his back. Sidharth lay on the lap of Shehnhaaz at 1:00 a.m., and the latter walked away gently. She slept, too, and when she woke up at 7am, she found Sidharth sleeping in the same position without moving, and he didn’t stir when she tried to wake him up. From the 12th story to the fifth level, where his family resided, Shehnaaz was terrified and hurried. She notified Sidharth’s sister and phoned their doctor of the family, who told Sidharth that he hadn’t been there anymore.

Ye ‘Dil’ hai Muskil

Why are young people suffering from heart attacks? The death of Siddharth Shukla, 40 years old, has stunned everyone. Initial stories indicating that a heart attack is the reason for Thursday’s death were killed, along with the big boss winner Season-13. In recent times, heart disease has been a worry for health professionals among young Indian people. The question is why in very young age groups in India there has been an increase in cardiac attack.

Concluding Remarks

The greatest way I can escape the trap of thinking that you have anything to lose is to remember that you will die. No excuse to not follow your heart. Nobody wants to die. Nobody wants to die. Such people don’t even want to die to go to paradise to get there. And yet death is our common destination. Nobody has ever avoided it and this is why death is perhaps the finest invention of existence. Life is the agent of transformation. The old one is clearing way for the new one.

Death is, however tragic, probably God’s most beautiful creation. Death is merely another trip; birth and life will never take place without death. It’s unavoidable to lose somebody. Bill Watterson, the creator of Calvin and Hobbes, illustrates this wonders: Death is transitory and the meaning of life and death. Death is temporary. Death is a normal part of life, we have to realize. Death gives life its full significance. Let life be like summer flowers, let life be lovely and death be like fall leaves. But would it not be much easier to face our own mortality, rather than being unhappy, knowing that our life has been fully and without regret? Even if we don’t want to go to die, it’s just as unavoidable for the sun at night. In conclusion, when your time comes, you don’t have to die happy but you need to die satisfied, since from start to finish you have lived your life.

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New Social Compact

4.1 billion lack social safety net

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More than four billion people live without any welfare protection today to cushion them from crisis, the UN International Labour Organization (ILO) said on Wednesday, while highlighting how the COVID-19 crisis has pushed up government spending by some 30 per cent.

Leading the call for countries to extend social safety nets far more widely than they do now, ILO Director-General Guy Ryder insisted that such a move would help future-proof workers and businesses in the face of new challenges.

“This is a pivotal moment to harness the pandemic response to build a new generation of rights-based social protection systems,” said Mr. Ryder.

“These can cushion people from future crises and give workers and businesses the security to tackle the multiple transitions ahead with confidence and with hope. We must recognize that effective and comprehensive social protection is not just essential for social justice and decent work but for creating a sustainable and resilient future too.”

In a new report the UN body acknowledged that the COVID-19 crisis had led to greater social protections worldwide, albeit mainly in wealthy countries.

It noted that only 47 per cent of the global population are covered by at least one social protection benefit, while only one in four children has access to national welfare safety nets.

Newborns’ needs unmet

Further research indicated that only 45 per cent of women with newborns worldwide receive a cash benefit, while only one in three people with severe disabilities receive a disability benefit.

Coverage of unemployment benefits is even lower, ILO said, with only 18.6 per cent of jobless workers effectively covered globally.

On retirement welfare, the UN body found that although nearly eight in 10 people receive some form of pension, major disparities remain across regions, between rural and urban areas and women and men.

Regional imbalances

The ILO report underscores the significant regional inequalities in social protection.

Europe and Central Asia have the highest rates of coverage, with 84 per cent of people having access to at least one benefit.

Countries in the Americas are also above the global average (64.3 per cent), in stark contrast to welfare roll-out in Asia and the Pacific (44 per cent), the Arab States (40 per cent) and Africa (17.4 per cent).

Highlighting differences in government spending on social protection, ILO said that high-income countries spend 16.4 per cent of national turnover (above the 13 per cent global average, excluding health), while low-income countries budget just 1.1 per cent.

Billions more needed

The UN body noted that since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, governments have had to increase spending massively to ensure minimum social protection for all, by around 30 per cent.

And it maintained that to guarantee basic social protection coverage, low-income countries would need to invest an additional $77.9 billion per year, lower-middle-income countries an additional $362.9 billion and upper-middle-income countries a further $750.8 billion annually. That’s equivalent to 15.9 per cent, 5.1 per cent and 3.1 per cent of their GDP, respectively.

“There is an enormous push for countries to move to fiscal consolidation, after the massive public expenditure of their crisis response measures, but it would be seriously damaging to cut back on social protection; investment is required here and now,” said Shahra Razavi, Director, ILO Social Protection Department.

Underscoring the multiple benefits of social welfare protection, Ms. Razavi insisted that it could promoted “better health and education, greater equality, more sustainable economic systems, better managed migration and the observance of core rights…The benefits of success will reach beyond national borders to benefit us all”.

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