Connect with us

Development

Indonesian President Addresses Global Business Leaders at the WEF Special Dialogue

Published

on

Today, President Joko Widodo of Indonesia took part in a dialogue with global business leaders, hosted by Klaus Schwab, Founder and Executive Chairman of the World Economic Forum.

The dialogue focused on the need for deeper public-private cooperation – currently focused on helping manage the COVID-19 pandemic – as well as providing a boost to the country’s economic recovery. Indonesia is currently experiencing its first recession in 22 years, and like many nations, is in the midst of tackling the pandemic; the country surpassed half a million confirmed cases of the disease this week.

“I would like to express my appreciation to the World Economic Forum for hosting the Country Strategy Dialogue on Indonesia at such a pivotal time for our country and the world,” said President Joko Widodo. “The Government of Indonesia remains strongly committed to engaging in public-private partnerships that support the country’s path towards sustainable and resilient economic recovery.”

In his opening remarks, the president said that the enactment of the Omnibus Law will help improve Indonesia’s investment climate and legal certainty, adding that: “Significant support from the business community in its implementation is essential, as it will add value to the government’s efforts in handling the pandemic and supporting economic recovery in a balanced and synergetic manner.”

More than 50 global business leaders took part in an interactive virtual discussion, during which they listened and offered suggestions to the president and members of his cabinet, who laid out their plans for economic revival.

“Indonesia with its large population, is making impressive progress in fighting COVID-19, and at the same time is using this pandemic as a means to restructure, modernize and upgrade its economy,” said Klaus Schwab, Founder and Executive Chairman of the World Economic Forum.

The president emphasized measures his government would be taking to manage the spread of COVID-19. The focus is on providing treatment and ultimately vaccinations for the population, while also cutting red tape to fast-track needed investment aimed at restoring Indonesia’s growth and securing its competitiveness post-pandemic.

Several important cabinet members, including Erick Thohir, Minister of State-Owned Enterprises and Retno L. P. Marsudi, Minister of Foreign Affairs, and Luhut B. Pandjaitan, Coordinating Minister for Maritime Affairs and Investment, took part in the dialogue. They presented details of the planned establishment of the country’s multibillion dollar sovereign wealth funds, implementation of the Job Creation Laws and planned investment incentives, as well as prioritizing environmental sustainability in recovery efforts, to ensure the country’s leadership in the area of green growth.

Global chief executive officers responded by presenting their plans for further investment and offered suggestions for collaboration.

James Quincey, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of The Coca-Cola Company said: “I appreciate the government’s efforts to encourage investment, maintain sustainability at the centre of their rebuilding efforts and clearly communicate their ambition to work together with different stakeholders to create new and innovative ways to foster growth.”

The Government of Indonesia and the World Economic Forum have agreed to continue the dialogue aimed at developing multistakeholder solutions in areas such as mainstreaming low-carbon investments, supporting Micro Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (MSME) through reskilling and upskilling, and building long-term resilience for the country’s travel and tourism sector.

Continue Reading
Comments

Development

World Bank and EU to Help Iraq Strengthen Public Financial Management Oversight

Published

on

The Government of Iraq, the World Bank Group, and the European Union signed today a grant agreement aimed at strengthening the Government of Iraq’s institutions and mechanisms of fiscal accountability and oversight at federal and sub-national levels. 

The project titled “Strengthening Public Financial Management (PFM) Oversight and Accountability Institutions” will benefit from jointly implemented US$12.5 million and is part of a technical assistance grant program signed back in September 2018 with the European Union to strengthen public financial management (PFM) oversight and increase the efficiency of public service delivery.

The program aims at improving PFM systems by strengthening payroll management through an IT platform. It will support transparency and accountability in the oil sector through the Extractive Industry Transparency Initiative. It will foster the anti-corruption agency which can help retrieve stolen assets and the auditor general as well as support the reform of State-Owned Enterprises. Other features will be strengthening procurement systems through e-procurement and supporting integrity in reconstruction programs. The project will also assist in further tackling revenue mobilization and fiscal federalism and can be revisited in one year to align further with government priorities.

This project compliments the ongoing World Bank-financed project titled “Modernization of Public Financial Management Systems” of US$41.5 million, which aims to improve financial information management and transparency, cash management, public investment management and public procurement modernization at selected federal and governorate agencies.

Now, more than ever, the importance of a strong public financial management system is critical”, said Ramzi Afif Neman, Head of World Bank Iraq Office. “The World Bank is committed to helping equip the Government of Iraq with mechanisms of fiscal accountability that are essential for sustainable reform, creation of a positive economic impact, and the restoration of public trust in the country’s financial institutions.

The efficient management of public finances and the delivery of services is critical in the achievement of public policy objectives, as well as for restoring the trust and social contract between Iraqi citizens and the country’s institutions”, said Martin Huth, European Union Ambassador to Iraq.

The project will support economic governance reforms at the federal level and in the Kurdistan region through technical assistance to many fiscal agencies, under the guidance of the Federal Ministry of Finance and the Prime Minister’s office. The project is in line with the economic reform “White Paper” recently published by the Government of Iraq which supports the overall World Bank Group’s development objectives and portfolio in Iraq. The project is also in line with the SDGs and European Union’s development objectives. 

Continue Reading

Development

Strengthening Indonesia’s Fiscal Resilience to Natural Disasters and Health-Related Shocks

Published

on

The World Bank’s Board of Executive Directors today approved a $500 million loan to strengthen Indonesia’s financial and fiscal resilience. The loan will help the country build and strengthen its financial response to natural disasters, climate risks, and health-related shocks.

Such shocks and disasters have become a constant threat to Indonesia’s development progress. From 2014 to 2018, the central government spent between US$90 million and US$500 million annually on disaster response and recovery, while local governments spent an estimated additional $250 million over the same period.

The cost of disasters is expected to increase further due to climate change and urban growth, adding to the burden on public spending. The needs are particularly acute now, with Indonesia experiencing multiple financial, fiscal, and social impacts due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Financial preparedness for disasters, climate shocks, and health crises such as COVID-19 is increasingly important for Indonesia. This support will help the government deliver a more targeted and timely response, reducing the impact of disasters and helping to protect Indonesia’s development progress,” said Sri Mulyani Indrawati, Minister of Finance of the Republic of Indonesia.

Planning an effective financial response after disasters and climate shocks helps to protect the budget and ultimately the population. By reducing the impacts of disasters, such planning can help protect the poor and vulnerable who often bear the brunt of disasters as they tend to live in hazard areas, lack access to basic services, and have limited access to financial resources to cope with the aftermath.

The new project will support the Government’s National Disaster Risk Finance and Insurance Strategy by strengthening Indonesia’s fiscal and financial resilience through a Pooling Fund for Disasters. This fund will become the central mechanism through which post-disaster financing can flow from different sources. The fund will look to leverage domestic and international insurance markets to provide financial capacity to backstop the fund.

The project will also help ensure effective and transparent flow of the funds to relevant government agencies, including budget tracking on disaster-related expenditures, faster social assistance payments for victims of disasters, and improved preparedness planning for health shocks. Central and local government agencies will receive additional, faster, and more effective financial support after a disaster.

“The improved availability and flow of funds will ultimately support the population of Indonesia who will benefit from faster and better targeted response to disaster and health shocks. This will particularly benefit the poorest and most vulnerable, who are most affected by delayed disaster response and often lose their livelihoods and incomes, which keeps them in poverty,” said Satu Kahkonen, World Bank Country Director for Indonesia and Timor-Leste.

The project is supported by a $14 million grant from the Global Risk Financing Facility (GRiF) to assist building technical capacity, environmental and social management systems, bring new technology to the management of the Pooling Fund, and invest in evaluations and learning, including how to best serve the most  vulnerable groups. Supported by a Multi-Donor Trust Fund with over $200 million from Germany and the United Kingdom, GRiF provides grants and technical expertise to help developing countries safeguard progress and recover more quickly from the financial impacts of climate shocks, disasters, and crises.

Continue Reading

Development

World Bank Helps Bangladesh Provide Education and Skills Training to Poor Children

Published

on

The government of Bangladesh today signed a $6.5 million financing agreement with the World Bank to enable around 39,000 slum children complete primary education as well as provide pre-vocational training to 8,500 school-dropped out youths in Cox’s Bazar. 

This additional financing to the Second Reaching Out of School Children (ROSC II) Project will support poor children aged between 8- to 14-years in eight city corporations to complete primary education cycle. This will also help vulnerable out-of-school local youth and adolescents in Cox’s Bazar to complete three-month courses in pre-vocational and enterprise development training.

The pandemic has disproportionately impacted the education of children from poorer households,” said Mercy Tembon, World Bank Country Director for Bangladesh and Bhutan. “The additional financing will help the slum children and the vulnerable youths build the foundations for better opportunities.”

Bangladesh government is committed to ensuring education for all. Today, almost all children in Bangladesh step into a school,” said Fatima Yasmin, Secretary, Economic Relations Division, Government of Bangladesh. 

About 690,000 children—almost half of them are girls—studied in the learning centers, known as Ananda Schools. The project has set up around 1,300 Learning Centres in slums of 8 city corporations, including Dhaka, where about 48,000 children are enrolled. At Ananda Schools, a single class teacher teaches the students until they are ready for the Grade 5 examination, allowing the poor children to proceed to the secondary schools. 

Since 2019, the ROSC II project expanded its coverage to provide learning opportunities and psycho-social support to about 350,000 Rohingya children in Teknaf and Ukhia Upazilla in Cox’s Bazar. Further, 16,500 Bangladeshi youths have received skills training and job placement support.

The agreement was signed by Fatima Yasmin and Mercy Tembon on behalf of the Government and the World Bank, respectively. 

The credit from the World Bank’s International Development Association, has a 30-year term, including a five-year grace period. The World Bank was among the first development partners to support Bangladesh following its independence. Since then, the World Bank has committed more than $33.5 billion in grants, interest-free, and concessional credits to the country. 

Continue Reading

Publications

Latest

Trending