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Pharmaceutical Strategy for Europe: Affordable, accessible and safe medicines for all

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The Commission has today adopted a Pharmaceutical Strategy for Europe to ensure patients have access to innovative and affordable medicines and to support the competitiveness, innovative capacity and sustainability of the EU’s pharmaceutical industry. The Strategy will allow Europe to cover its pharmaceutical needs, including in times of crisis, through robust supply chains. A key component of building a stronger European Health Union, as called for by President von der Leyen in her State of the Union Speech, the Strategy will help to establish a future-proof and crisis-resilient EU pharmaceutical system.

Europe’s Pharmaceutical Strategy has four main objectives:

  • Ensuring access to affordable medicines for patients, and addressing unmet medical needs (e.g. in the areas of antimicrobial resistance, cancer, rare diseases);
  • Supporting competitiveness, innovation and sustainability of the EU’s pharmaceutical industry and the development of high quality, safe, effective and greener medicines
  • Enhancing crisis preparedness and response mechanisms, and addressing security of supply;
  • Ensuring a strong EU voice in the world, by promoting a high level of quality, efficacy and safety standards.

Although the Strategy is much more than a crisis-response instrument, it draws lessons from the initial response to the COVID-19 pandemic, and makes Europe’s pharmaceutical sector better prepared and more resilient.

The Strategy presents concrete actions to ensure accessibility, availability and affordability of medicines. It supports diversified and secure supply chains, ensuring the EU’s open strategic autonomy in the world, and it promotes environmentally sustainable pharmaceuticals.

The Strategy will also ensure that the EU’s pharmaceutical policy continues to serve public health in an ever-changing environment of scientific and commercial transformations. It will support patient centred innovations and accommodate digital and technological change.

Members of the College said

President of the European Commission, Ursula von der Leyen, stated: “The coronavirus pandemic has highlighted the vital need to strengthen our health systems. This includes access to safe, effective and high-quality medicines at an affordable price.  In the challenging economic and social times the EU is currently facing, the strategy adopted today will ensure that Europe and Europeans will continue to benefit from such medicines. I call on Member States and the Parliament to endorse this approach which will be rolled out in the next three years, and beyond.”

Vice-President for Promoting the European Way of Life, Margaritis Schinas, said: “Effective and safe medicines, vaccines and treatments have helped to tackle some of the leading causes of disease and life-threatening illnesses in the past. These products will be crucial to uphold the health and well-being of the European citizens in these challenging times. Today’s strategy supports the EU’s pharmaceutical industry to remain competitive and innovative, whilst addressing the needs of the patients and those of our health systems.”

Stella Kyriakides, Commissioner for Health and Food Safety, stressed: “Today we launch the work to ensure that safe and effective medicines are accessible and affordable at all times and to all patients across the EU. With our Pharmaceutical Strategy for Europe, we are delivering on our commitment to create a future-proof and patient-centred pharmaceutical environment in which the EU industry can innovate, flourish and continue to be a global leader. It is our long-term vision for open strategic autonomy, and our response to the challenges of today and the vulnerabilities exposed by COVID-19. Today we put in place another pillar of the European Health Union.”

Background

The Pharmaceutical Strategy for Europe marks the beginning of a process: its implementation includes an ambitious agenda of legislative and non-legislative actions which will be launched over the coming years.  

Actions will cover the whole ecosystem of pharmaceuticals, but also some aspects of medical devices. It creates synergies with the Green Deal and our actions under the EU Strategic approach of pharmaceuticals in the environment to reduce their environmental risk, address pollution from pharmaceutical residues and promote greener manufacturing, use and disposal (a progress report is available). It is also linked to the action plan on Intellectual Property presented today.  

The flagship actions of the Strategy include:

  • A revision of the basic pharmaceutical legislation* (target date for a proposal: 2022) with a view to making this framework future-proof and innovation friendly;
  • A proposal for a EU Health Emergency Response Authority (proposal: 2nd semester 2021);
  • A revision of the regulations on medicines for children and rare diseases
  • Initiating a structured dialogue with and between all actors in the pharmaceutical manufacturing and public authorities to identify vulnerabilities in the global supply chain of critical medicines and shape policy options to strengthen the continuity and security of supply in the EU;
  • Cooperation between national authorities on pricing, payment and procurement policies, to improve the affordability, cost-effectiveness of medicines and health system’s sustainability;
  • The creation of a robust digital infrastructure, including a proposal for a European Health Data Space (target date for a proposal: 2021);
  • Support to research and innovation, notably via Horizon 2020 and EU4Health;
  • Actions to promote innovative approaches to EU R&D and public procurement for antimicrobials and their alternatives and measures to restrict and optimise their use.
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Health & Wellness

Why Students Should Have Sports Pauses Between Lectures

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Including physical activities and exercise in your day can provide some great benefits. As a student, you may have a busy schedule that can make it difficult to engage in healthy habits. However, playing sports between lectures or being involved in a college team on campus has many benefits. Unfortunately, some students report that walking is their daily exercise. While this does help keep the body moving, it is not enough to meet today’s standards.

Here, we look at how a student, and even teachers, can benefit from playing sports between their lectures and classes. Whether it is done on campus or at a gym with peers, including fitness exercise is one of the ways to ensure your body and brain remain healthy.

Aerobic Exercise for Brain Health

As a college student, it can be hard finding the time to include sports in a schedule. However, playing sports and adding exercise are essential for brain function. While trying to juggle attending classes, completing coursework, and writing essays, students may need to find some extra help. With essay writing services, one can get assistance with essays, research papers, homework, and more. Students can free up some time and still maintain their grades. Asking for help does not mean failure. It can be a great way for any struggling student to learn how to spell for good grades, meet strict deadlines, and more.

During that extra time, getting involved in sports between classes or lectures can be very beneficial. This can positively affect a protein called BDNF, which promotes the growth of nerve cells. Types of aerobic exercise will also help with heart health and can enhance your mindset. It will improve alertness and attention, allowing students to learn and retain information easier. This can help those that struggle with writing essays or a research paper. Adding exercise or playing low-impact sports could boost motivation so that students can complete their next assigned essay on their own.

Help with Stress and Anxiety

Stress is something that every student will deal with. They have to complete courses, write essays, and even rewrite papers based on teacher comments on students’ writing. This all takes up time and can lead to great levels of stress. There have been studies conducted on how engaging in sports activities can reduce these things. By taking a time-out period during the day to exercise, daily stressors can be reduced. During this time, engaging in a low-intensity workout can effectively reduce anxiety and stress.

Aerobic exercise will help one rebuild confidence and alleviate some anxiety. When exercising, there will be reduced muscle tension, and it teaches one to look for different situations that provoke stress or anxiety. Many students stress or have anxiety over their grades. If you have a student contract for grades in college, there is an agreement between you and the professor on grading papers a bit differently. Even though you may have this contract, stress will always be a factor when completing assignments. Taking some time to play sports on campus between classes or study sessions can help with this.

Improves Sleep

Whether you are a student tackling courses or a teacher grading college papers, getting a good night’s sleep is essential. Having some type of physical routine and exercising will help to improve sleep quality. Those who play sports will also be able to fall asleep faster. While sleeping, the brain is always working and retaining information from studying. Not getting enough sleep can lead to decreased attention in class. By getting in a good 8 hours, higher brain functions will not be impaired, allowing you to be a better student and maintain good grades.

To get the most from exercise, try to schedule workouts, practices, or scrimmages in the morning or afternoon. If you exercise too close to when you go to sleep, your body temperature may be too high, resulting in the inability to fall asleep.

How to Incorporate Exercise

If you are one that does not regularly exercise but you want to start enjoying the benefits, there are some ways to easily add a routine to your schedule. Students have many things to worry about when attending a university. Staying healthy and having good brain function are usually not things that many think of. However, they are essential to your academic success. If you are ready to include exercise, here are some tips that can be useful:

·        Save Money – Money is the main concern for any student, and not everyone can afford a gym membership. There are some free or inexpensive ways to have access to what is needed for a good workout. Buying or borrowing resistance bands, exercise balls, or jump ropes are just a few examples.

·        Make a Schedule – Just like you have a schedule for classes and homework, having one for sports is also needed. This will allow you to set aside specific time slots for playing a game or getting in practice, making it a priority. Experts suggest performing exercise regimes in the morning, so there are no excuses for procrastination later in the day.

·        Make Lifestyle Adjustments – Making small changes during the day can help achieve exercise goals. Choose to take the stairs instead of escalators, walk or bike around campus, and add a walk during study breaks instead of snacking or socializing.

·        Join School Activities – There are many others who are looking to stay healthy and keep fit. Some schools have activities that include programs and classes. These are held on campus, so they provide easy access and allow for interaction with peers. Every college will have a wide array of sports that can be enjoyed. You can join teams representing your university or play some social games with others.

Conclusion

Academic performance is the main focus for college students, but it is not everything. Your general health should also be a concern. You will need to be mentally and physically healthy so you can benefit from those good grades that are being earned. There is no need to take part in rigorous training sessions or intense sporting activities. Simple activities can promote a healthy body and mind, and many activities can be found right on campus.

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Monkeypox virus testing for 20 African Union Member States

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With rising cases of Monkypox virus in Africa, the Centre for Disease Control (Africa CDC) and the African Society for Laboratory Medicine (ASLM) have jointly held its first training on Real-Time PCR-based Monkeypox virus (MPXV) testing for 20 African Union Member States in Abuja, Nigeria.

It was the first in the series of hands-on training on real-time PCR-based monkeypox virus (MPXV) diagnosis launched and organized in partnership with Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC) in June.

The three-day training workshop is designed to cover a combination of theoretical and hands-on training in the collection and handling of MPXV suspected specimen; isolation of nucleic acid; detection of MPXV using RT-PCR assay; interpretation and reporting of results for public health interventions. 

Furthermore, the Africa CDC in partnership with Jiangsu Bioperfectus Technologies Co., Ltd. will distribute MPXV RT-PCR kits to expand testing in participating Member States.

Dr. Yenew Kebede, Head Division of Laboratory Systems and Networks at the Africa CDC, said: “Laboratory testing capacity is key to expand MPXV surveillance in endemic and non-endemic countries across the continent. This training is timely and critical to build and expand MPXV testing capacity and capability across the continent. We will continue to organize additional trainings and distribute testing kits to additional African Member States in order to strengthen MPXV surveillance in the continent.”

Dr. Ifedayo Adetifa, Director General of NCDC, commented: “Establishing diagnostic capacity for infectious diseases including for monkeypox virus is an essential first step in gaining the understanding required for preparedness and response. So, we are very delighted to partner with Africa CDC to conduct hands-on training for 20 African countries on the RT-PCR based detection of monkeypox virus. The training covers a range of topics from collection and handling of specimen to RT-PCR testing and reporting of results to inform response and containment strategies.”

Dr. Ahmed Ogwell, Acting Director of the Africa CDC, said: “Africa CDC will continue to support Member States in strengthening their capacity and capability to detect and respond to disease outbreaks. Recently, we have issued a call for more support to Member States and increased access to diagnostics, therapeutics and vaccines to limit the spread of MPXV. The MPXV training and the distribution of test kits is key to expand MPXV surveillance across the continent.” 

The participants are expected to put into practice the skills and knowledge gained from this training to expand MPXV testing and surveillance in their home country. Furthermore, the training workshop will create a network of laboratory experts to collaborate and share expertise and resources in MPXV detection and response.

The training was coordinated and supported through the Africa CDC – Africa Pathogen Genomics Initiative (Africa PGI). The training workshop targeted 20 participants from 20 African Union (AU) Member States: Benin, Chad, Cote d’Ivore, Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, Gabon, Ghana, Guinéa, Liberia, Mali, Mozambique, Niger, Republic of Congo, Senegal, Sierra Leone, South Sudan, Sudan, Togo, Uganda, and Zambia.

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COVID-19: BA.4 and BA.5 variants spur 20 per cent rise in cases

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COVID-19 cases are on the rise in some 110 countries, driven by the BA.4 and BA.5 variants, said the UN health agency chief on Wednesday, amounting to a 20 per cent spike overall, and a rise in the number of deaths across three of the six world regions monitored by the World Health Organization.

WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus stressed in his weekly briefing to journalists that the global figure overall remains “relatively stable”, but nobody should be under any illusion, that the coronavirus is on the way out.

“This pandemic is changing but it’s not over. We have made progress but it’s not over.”

Act together

“Only with concerted action by governments, international agencies and the private sector can we solve the converging challenges”, said the WHO chief.

He warned that our ability to track the virus is under threat as reporting and genomic sequences are declining. The optimistic mid-year deadline for all countries to vaccinate at least 70 per cent of their populations is looking unlikely, with the average rate in low-income countries, standing at 13 per cent.

On the bright side, in the past 18 months, more than 12 billion vaccines have been distributed around the world, and 75 percent of the world’s health workers and over-60s are now vaccinated.

20 million lives saved by shots

The influential Lancet medical journal, estimates that 20 million lives have been saved because of vaccines, said Tedros.

Last year, it was the hoarding of vaccines by rich and manufacturing countries which proved to be the major barrier to access, but this year, it’s what he described as the wavering “political commitment to getting vaccines out to people – and challenges of disinformation”, which are thwarting the pace of inoculations at the national level.

He called for all at-risk groups, to be vaccinated and boosted, as soon as possible.

“For the general population, it also makes sense to keep strengthening that wall of immunity, which helps lessen the severity of the disease and lowers the risk of long- or post-COVID condition.”

He said continuing ‘mild’ cases are disruptive and damaging, keeping children out of school and adults from their jobs, “which causes further economic and supply chain disruption.” 

He said the goal of 70 per cent coverage was still desirable, based on the principle that if we don’t share vaccines equitably, “then we undercut the philosophy that all lives have equal worth.”

Second generation vaccines

Tedros said that it was critical for funding to be secured for “second generation vaccines”, as well as testing and treatments.

“The ideal solution would be the development of a pan-coronavirus vaccine that covers all the variants so far and potentially future ones”, the WHO chief declared.  

“This is feasible, WHO continues to convene scientists and researchers and there has been a lot of research into this virus and understanding immunology overall.”

New global trials

He said through the agency’s Solidarity Trials, global trials of new vaccines could take place to rapidly establish their safety and efficacy.

“Now is the time”, he concluded, for government health departments to integrate tests and anti-virals into clinical care, so that people that are sick can be treated quickly. 

“With new variants of concern likely – genomic sequencing remains critical. I also call for accelerated efforts and incentives to be developed around the moonshot of developing a pan-coronavirus vaccine.”

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