Connect with us

Finance

Highlighting the impact of brands in an increasingly digitalization-driven world economy

Published

on

The United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), and the European Brand Institute (EBI), held the 16th Brand Global Summit at the Vienna International Centre and online. The Summit brought together leading branding experts and government representatives, and showcased success stories of Branding for Sustainability – a theme that raises awareness of brands’ impact on business performance, upgrading and sustainable development.

The event was held in an online and offline hybrid format, gathering hundreds of participants from government, business, academia and international organizations. Discussions highlighted the ever-growing importance of branding and intellectual property, particularly in times of COVID-19 and increased digitalization.

“The pandemic has brought inevitable challenges, but also opportunities. As we have seen during this pandemic, digitalization has accelerated dramatically. It has opened a window of opportunity for new approaches, including in branding,” noted LI Yong, Director General of UNIDO.

Gerhard Hrebicek, President of the EBI, underlined the fact that “brands are the most valuable intangible assets that, unfortunately, remain the least understood”.

UNIDO has pioneered branding as a tool for sustainable and inclusive industrial development. Since launching the service module, “Branding for competitiveness and sustainable growth (B4C)”, the approach has generated a number of success stories across the globe and industries. Examples of corporate-, destination-, city- and region- branding initiatives showd the value of (umbrella) branding initiatives for improving product quality, leading to more competitiveness, sales and contributing to sustainable development.

Investment in brands show superior returns and short payback times, as UNIDO’s project beneficiaries showcased. UNIDO’s branding initiatives have had a large impact on Armenia’s textile sector, Cuba’s agribusiness development, Namibia’s sustainable bush harvesting, Morocco and Tunisia’s food-processing, and Tajikistan’s carpet industries, leading to an increase in tax income, exports and job creation.

Representatives from the private sector also emphasized the value of brands and highlighted the need for a uniform approach to brand evaluation. Only 10% of companies make use of brands, so “branding has to be democratized, proactively managed and measured, thereby resulting in increased competitiveness, innovation and sustainable development, contributing to the SDGs,” Hrebicek added.

Speakers identified financing for companies through brands and the potential and challenges of digitalization for brands as among the main challenges. It is easier than ever to become global, by going online, but that requires integrated planning and a strategic branding and digitalization initiative, suggested Austria’s Federal Minister of Digital and Economic Affairs, Margarete Schramböck, who underlined that “branding for digitalization is key, and comes first in all the initiatives.”

Hhighlighting the benefits, UNIDO’s Li noted: “As digitalization continues to accelerate dramatically during the pandemic, UNIDO incorporates the perspective of developing countries that turn towards innovation-intensive production and intelligent marketing, including strategic branding as a tool to advance inclusive and sustainable industrial development”.

To address the challenges going forward, UNIDO and the EBI will further expand their branding activities globally. Raising awareness of the value of brands and realize their potential for sustainability will require the combined efforts of this partnership, the private sector’s awareness and public support. Bringing the discussion to the highest levels and decision-makers, branding can guide companies on innovative paths to increase their value added and achieve sustainability. Therefore, UNIDO and EBI are planning a Brand Global Summit roadshow, with worldwide coverage, to address the bottlenecks of branding and increase strategic brand management’s efficacy for sustainable development.

Continue Reading
Comments

Finance

5 Resume Website Mistakes to Avoid

Published

on

First impressions are crucial, and a poorly designed personal website can put employers off. Sadly, too many candidates fall prey to pitfalls like information overload or poor grammar. These mistakes have far-reaching implications for your career. Discover the biggest errors to avoid in 2022.

1.      Overwhelming Layout

The common wisdom is that a resume should fit on one A4 page. When you build a resume website, this approach could result in a cluttered look. The format gives more freedom and room to play with. Even a one-page web template is more spacious than a sheet of paper!

Highlight your experience and education on different pages or choose a timeline layout. Separate sections and elements with the right amount of whitespace. Make sure the website does not look overwhelming.

2.      Typos and Grammar Mistakes

Any errors, intentional or unintentional, make you look bad in the eyes of potential employers. Visitors may conclude that you could not be bothered to proofread your own text. To find mistakes, use an online checker, read each page out loud or try reading the content backward. If grammar is not your strength, ask someone else to proofread the content before marketing it.

3.      Poor Image Quality

Any photos or screenshots of your work must be big enough so users understand what each image is about. However, file size also matters — if the items are too big for the web, they will slow down your website. Generally, JPEG is preferable for photos, while PNG is best for screenshots that require transparency (for example, logos or images with special effects).

Include a professional headshot. If you cannot afford it, ask someone to take your picture against a neutral background, or use a selfie timer and a tripod. You could also create a unique personal photo that strengthens your brand — for example, by using specific colors.

4.      Too Much or Too Little Information

Do not omit vital information (e.g., successful projects) for the sake of brevity. A virtual resume lets you showcase all major accomplishments. If you do lack experience but have participated in volunteer projects or internships, these are worth including. Links to published works add credibility.

The need for detail does not justify information about color preferences, favorite coffee, or pets. Personal details must highlight qualities that will help you get ahead in your career. Focus on showcasing the best work and let it speak for itself. Employers are not interested in the evolution of your skills, they want the best results now.

5.      Unresponsive Theme

Finally, remember that potential employers will probably open your website from mobile devices. Make sure they will be able to view all content and navigate the pages smoothly. Nobody wants to spend time zooming in and scrolling in all possible directions to find the necessary information.

Continue Reading

Finance

GCC returns to growth amid high oil prices and strong responses to COVID-19

Published

on

Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) economies are expected to return to an aggregate growth rate of 2.6% in 2021, according to the latest issue of the World Bank Gulf Economic Update (GEU), “Seizing the Opportunity for a Sustainable Recovery.” The six-member GCC is composed of the United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Oman, Kuwait, and Bahrain.

Their robust recovery, which is due to stronger oil prices and the growth of non-oil sectors, will accelerate into 2022 as OPEC+-mandated oil production cuts are phased out and higher oil prices improve business sentiment and attract additional investment. These favorable oil market conditions have shrunk fiscal and external imbalances as export earnings recover. However, the outlook in the medium-term is subject to risks from slower global recovery, renewed coronavirus outbreaks, and oil sector volatility.

The World Bank’s latest GEU report focuses on addressing the wage bill in the GCC—the amount of government spending devoted to the salaries and benefits of state employees. Well-paid, public sector jobs are part of the region’s social contract, as well the free health care, education, social security benefits, and subsidized housing and utilities which citizens are often also offered.

“With high population growth and limited options in the private sector, the wage bill has become unsustainable in some GCC countries, as it is a large part of government spending and of the economy overall,” said Issam Abousleiman, World Bank Regional Director for the GCC. “Given their improved fiscal situation, this is an opportune time for GCC governments to accelerate their reforms agenda and reach the goals they set for themselves.”

According to the report, the average GCC wage bill over the past two decades has exceeded the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) average, except in Qatar and the UAE. Many GCC countries have public sectors that are well within OECD norms size-wise, in terms of the numbers of employees. However, public servants are paid a wage premium of between 50–100%, which results in a high wage bill relative to the countries’ total spending and GDP.

Despite the oil price crash, spending on the wage bill and the numbers of people employed in the public sector have both risen inexorably upwards. Kuwait’s 2022 budget allocated KWD 12.6bn (about US$42bn) for salaries and benefits, or 55% of its total expenditure. Other countries in the GCC are in a similar position: Oman’s wage bill has doubled in the past decade despite efforts to cap its growth. Saudi Arabia’s allowances for civil servants rose from SAR 44bn in 2016 to SAR 148bn in 2019 and now form more than a third of the government’s total wage bill.

These high wage bills are adding excessive pressure to GCC budgets, especially in countries with fewer resources and limited fiscal buffers. In consequence, most are either introducing or expanding their tax bases, trimming back benefits, and exploring early retirement options for some staff. Rather than providing a prescriptive solution in their report, World Bank economists highlight some of the options adopted by other countries and suggest GCC countries reach consensus among stakeholders before moving forward.

Continue Reading

Finance

What can I do with an Economics degree?

Published

on

A degree in economics will increase your employability in any industry. High-skilled graduates are in high demand worldwide. The wide range of problem-solving and analytical skills that students with economics degrees have made them a versatile and valuable asset to the economy industry makes it a very interesting field. This filed is really difficult in getting in degree and quite who has ever learned economics have thought “I need help to do my economics assignment” but it is worth spending 4+ years if you are really into it.

Here’s a list of top economics jobs, including details about what you can expect and skills required.

Economist careers

A professional economist will research and analyze economic data, issues, and trends. You will need to complete a postgraduate degree in economics to be qualified to work as an economist. A professional economist will also need to be able produce economic forecasts and reports that can be presented to clients (individuals or financial institutions) and provide business advice.

Local and national government, private and public banks, insurance companies, think tanks, large multinational corporations, financial consultancies and accountancy firms are all possible employers. This role requires a solid understanding of current affairs and economic contexts.

Bank jobs in Economics

Economists are attracted to banking careers. These jobs offer great earning potential and high demand. A background in economics is highly valued for roles in financial management, financial planning and risk analysis. Bank careers focus on advising and providing services to a wide range of customers and clients, with a strong emphasis on meeting the financial needs of their clients.

Accountancy careers in economics

Further professional qualifications are required to become a qualified accountant. However, economics graduates can find many roles in accountancy. You can work in multiple industries and be an accountant. Your job focuses on the financial position of an individual, company, or organization. Accounting careers often involve recording, classifying and interpreting financial data.

Strong analytical skills and computer literacy are required for these careers. Accounting jobs are best suited for graduates in Economics who can easily make sense out of complex data sets.

Careers in economics and financial consultancy

Economists and economists are vital to the financial consulting industry and the business world. There are many opportunities for economics graduates to find employment in large and medium-sized companies that need to conduct economic research. A role as an economic researcher requires a thorough understanding of economic theories, models, analytical and problem solving skills, and mathematical ability. Similar roles would be filled by financial consultants working in the field of economics. However, they might work for multiple clients and produce reports as well as advising on business strategy. This role requires a high level of industry knowledge and understanding of corporate finances.

The public sector offers many opportunities for economic careers

Economists are highly valued in all aspects of public and private spending. The public sector often includes jobs in economics, including transport, commercial, waste and energy services. The recent global recession and tightening of economic regulation worldwide have led to an increase in the demand for economics students.

Careers in economics that involve data analysis and actuarial work

An actuary can be described as a business professional who advises on and evaluates the impact of financial uncertainty and risk. Accurate knowledge of both economics and business is used by actuaries to provide reports and develop strategies for reducing these risks. The majority of the entry-level roles in this field involve insurance and pensions. However, later you may be able move into areas such as banking, investments, or healthcare. Actuaries need to be proficient in mathematics and statistical compiling, as well as able communicate complex data to non-experts.

Careers and jobs in alternative economics

A background in economics can make it seem that almost anything is possible. Other common roles and careers in economics include stockbroker and insurer, business manager (retail merchandizer), retail merchandizer and pricing analyst, statistician and financial consultant, and salesperson.

If none of these interests you, what are you able to do with an economics degree? These are just a few of the options you might want to explore: international development and human resource management, journalism law, management, marketing research, politics, public relation, taxation and taxation. Or you can even start your own business as an entrepreneur!

Continue Reading

Publications

Latest

modi bangladesh modi bangladesh
South Asia4 hours ago

Fifty Years OF India-Bangladesh Ties: Sky’s The Limit

Bangladesh and India are two neighboring countries of South Asia and these two countries have historically had very close relations....

South Asia8 hours ago

Pakistan slips on a slippery slope of religious militancy

Pakistani political and military leaders have vowed to eradicate ultra-conservative religious extremism that drove a mob to torture, brutally lynch...

Development10 hours ago

Report Underlines Reforms to Support Fiscal Federalism, Green Growth in Nepal

Nepal has made significant strides in implementing fiscal federalism while key reforms are needed to support fiscal sustainability and Nepal’s...

Africa12 hours ago

The UK’s travel ban: Why Nigerians must look towards their leaders

Once again Nigeria’s image problem rears its ugly head, only this time, it has to do with how little care...

Development14 hours ago

Philippines: Boosting Private Sector Growth Can Strengthen Recovery, Create More Jobs

Rebounding from a deep contraction in 2020, the Philippine economy is forecast to grow 5.3 percent this year before accelerating...

International Law16 hours ago

The crisis of international law

The idea of promoting the human rights agenda in the image and likeness of the Western countries’ principles – as...

Eastern Europe18 hours ago

Lithuania: pensioners get ready for death

Main attention of the Lithuanian media has been focused on migrant crises and security issues for several weeks. This problem...

Trending