Connect with us

Finance

Prevent bankruptcy with a PI agency

Published

on

Filing for bankruptcy should be a transparent process. The person filing for bankruptcy should give an honest declaration of their incomes, expenses, and assets in exchange for having their debts discharged.

Unfortunately, this doesn’t always happen.

A notable fraudulent activity committed by many debtors during the filling of their bankruptcy is the concealing of assets.

Concealing of assets refers to a situation where a debtor tries to hide some of their assets during a bankruptcy process. This is done so that these assets don’t end up being used to pay the debtor’s creditors. Once the bankruptcy period is over, the debtor gets their assets back. Thus, the person gets rid of their debt but still retains their assets.

Ways in which a debtor may try to conceal their assets during a bankruptcy filing process include:

·         Transferring the assets to friends or family members

·         Tying up assets in businesses or hidden companies

·         Channeling assets to offshore accounts

·         Some debtors pay more money to their creditors

·         Buying of property or other expensive luxury items

·         Creating fake mortgages, so the property looks like it has no value

·         Buy assets such as bonds, insurance policies, annuities, or stocks

If you’re a creditor and you suspect that your debtor may be trying to conceal their assets, you can seek the help of a Melbourne private investigators agency to help prevent bankruptcy.

What Can a Private Investigators Agency Do to Prevent Bankruptcy?

The court expects a debtor filing for bankruptcy to be honest about their debts and the value of their assets. During the case, the court will employ an asset discovery process through which it will gather information on the debtor’s assets.

In addition to the information provided in court, creditors can also hire the services of a private investigator (PI) to locate hidden assets.

A private investigator will:

·         Conduct a thorough investigation to locate hidden assets

·         Prepare a report that they’ll present in court as evidence

·         Give a testimony in court regarding the hidden assets

Why Should You Hire the Services of a PI Agency?

If you’re a creditor and you suspect foul play by your debtor during the filing of their bankruptcy case, you should consider seeking the services of a PI agency.

Such an agency will have access to databases and public records that can help them trace hidden assets. They also have the experience and the tools to conduct such an investigation, something you or your lawyer may not have.

A qualified PI will sift through the debtor’s tax reports, online records, payroll slips, bank records, reports from family and friends, debts, property filings, addresses, references, and other data to locate processes and locations that may be proof of hidden assets.  The right private investigator will also know bankruptcy laws and what it takes to satisfy a court that the debtor has hidden assets.

The agency may also have PIs with military and law enforcement background making them the right people for the job.

What Happens If the Debtor is found To Have Concealed Property

If after the private investigator’s report and testimony the court is convinced that the debtor tried to conceal assets, lie about their income, or defraud the court, they may face the below consequences:

·         The court will deny them a bankruptcy discharge which means they will still be obligated to pay you and other creditors

·         The court will revoke an already granted discharge

·         The debtor cannot discharge the debts in that case in any other subsequent bankruptcies

·         The debtor may face criminal charges where the penalty may be a $250,000 fine or imprisonment of up to twenty years

If you suspect that a debtor who owes you money may be trying to defraud the bankruptcy process by concealing assets, you need to hire a Melbourne private investigators agency. A PI from the agency will review the case and reveal the truth.  If they gather enough evidence to convince the court of the fraud, you might get your debt paid by the debtor.

Continue Reading
Comments

Finance

Sarah Frier wins the Financial Times and McKinsey & Company Business Book of the Year Award 2020

Published

on

Stephen Boyle wins the Bracken Bower Prize 2020

The Financial Times and McKinsey & Company today announce that Sarah Frier is the winner of the 2020 Business Book of the Year Award for No Filter: The Inside Story of How Instagram Transformed Business, Celebrity and Our Culture, published by UK Random House Business in the UK, and Simon & Schuster in the US.

The Award recognises a work which provides the ‘most compelling and enjoyable insight into modern business issues’. It was awarded today to Sarah Frier at a virtual event, co-hosted by Roula Khalaf, Editor of the Financial Times and chair of the panel of judges, and Kevin Sneader, Global Managing Partner, McKinsey & Company. The keynote speaker at the event was Laxman Narasimhan, Chief Executive of Reckitt Benckiser.

No Filter saw off strong competition from a shortlist of titles with a focus on subjects ranging from the future of work, corporate culture, technology and the US economy, to win the £30,000 prize. Each of the five runners-up will receive £10,000.

Roula Khalaf, Editor, Financial Times said, “No Filter is a topical and well-reported account of the rise of Instagram and its takeover by Facebook. But it also tackles two vital issues of our age: how Big Tech treats smaller rivals and how social media companies are shaping the lives of a new generation.” 

Kevin Sneader, Global Managing Partner, McKinsey & Company, said: “Sarah Frier has written a compelling saga about how this start-up phenomenon deeply embedded itself into the global cultural Zeitgeist of this digital era, in just one decade after its creation.”

The distinguished judging panel for the 2020 Financial Times and McKinsey Business Book of the Year Award, chaired by Roula Khalaf, comprised:

  • Mitchell Baker, Chief Executive Officer, Mozilla Corporation; Chairwoman, Mozilla Foundation
     
  • Mohamed El-Erian, President of Queens’ College, Cambridge, and Chief Economic Advisor, Allianz (BBYA Winner, 2008, When Markets Collide)
     
  • Herminia Ibarra,  Charles Handy Professor of Organisational Behaviour, London Business School
     
  • Randall Kroszner, Professor of Economics and Deputy Dean for Executive Programs, University of Chicago Booth School of Business
     
  • Dambisa Moyo, Global Economist and Author, Non-Executive Director, 3M Company,  Chevron & Conde Nast
     
  • Raju Narisetti, Global Publishing Director, McKinsey & Company
     
  • Shriti Vadera, Chair-elect of Prudential


The Financial Times and McKinsey & Company also announced Stephen Boyle as the winner of the 2020 Bracken Bower Prize. The Prize is designed to encourage young authors to tackle emerging business themes in a proposal for a book that is not yet published. Its aim is to unearth new talent and encourage writers to research ideas that could fill future business books of the year.

Stephen Boyle was awarded £15,000 for his book proposal, New Money, about how central bank digital currencies could transform the economy – and why you might not want them to.
 

The distinguished judging panel for the Bracken Bower Prize comprised:

  • Lorella Belli, Founder and Director, Lorella Belli Literary Agency Limited
     
  • Isabel Fernandez-Mateo, Adecco Professor of Strategy and Entrepreneurship, London Business School
     
  • Jorma Ollila, former Chairman, Royal Dutch Shell and Nokia
     
  • Saadia Zahidi, Managing Director and Head of the Centre for the New Economy and Society, World Economic Forum. (BBP Winner, 2014, Fifty Million Rising)

Continue Reading

Finance

Sri Lanka Can Build Back Better from COVID-19 and Realize Inclusive Growth

Published

on

The World Bank’s new Country Director for Maldives, Nepal and Sri Lanka, Faris Hadad-Zervos, completed his first visit to Sri Lanka today. The purpose of this visit was to meet key policymakers and understand the country’s development priorities. Based in Kathmandu, Nepal, this was the Country Director’s first visit to Sri Lanka in his new role. Hadad-Zervos was joined by Chiyo Kanda, the new Country Manager for Maldives and Sri Lanka, based in Colombo.

“We appreciate the frank and productive conversations we had with government officials, members of the private sector and civil society and all those whom we met during our visits in Colombo and the Provinces. These gave us a growing understanding of the Sri Lankan sustainable development storyline and aspirations,” said Faris Hadad-Zervos, World Bank Country Director for Maldives, Nepal and Sri Lanka. “The World Bank is a long-term partner for the people of Sri Lanka and is committed to help the country reach its full potential for the benefit of all its people.”

The new World Bank management team paid courtesy calls to His Excellency the President Gotabaya Rajapaksa, Hon. Prime Minister Mahinda Rajapaksa, Cabinet and State Ministers, Governor of the Central Bank of Sri Lanka, and Secretaries and senior officials associated with the current World Bank program in Sri Lanka.

They also met with members of civil society from across the spectrum, private sector representatives, development partners as well as thought leaders to better understand Sri Lanka’s vast potential for sustainable growth.

The visits included the port and other facilities in the Hambantota district to observe infrastructure development in the south. At the government hospital-Halthota in Kalutara district, they learned about the government effort to improve primary health care, integrating screening and management of non-communicable diseases, and strengthen promotive and outreach services.    

 “The World Bank is mindful of the challenges the country is facing in this COVID19 era but will also keep our eye on the opportunities for sustainable recovery. We will leverage our knowledge, technical and financial resources to support Sri Lanka to build back better in the post-COVID era for inclusive and resilient growth,” said Chiyo Kanda, World Bank Country Manager for Maldives and Sri Lanka “We are in the process of updating our Systematic Country Diagnostic to deepen our understanding and inform our next Country Partnership Framework that will define the World Bank Group’s engagements with Sri Lanka for the next 4-5 years.”  

The Systematic Country Diagnostic is a thorough analysis, informed by consultations with a broad range of stakeholders, of the key challenges and opportunities in reducing poverty and boosting shared prosperity in a sustainable manner.

In response to the COVID pandemic, the World Bank leveraged the existing portfolio and repurposed a significant portion to support the Government’s effort to reduce the impact of the pandemic. Providing urgently needed personal protective equipment (PPE), supporting vulnerable groups with temporary cash support, improving COVID-19 protection measures on public transport, facilitating tele-education for school children, and providing digital solutions to improve delivery of public services are among the emergency response activities already completed or ongoing. Discussions are under way to further adjust the program to adapt to government’s priorities and emerging development needs.

The current World Bank portfolio in Sri Lanka consists of 19 ongoing projects, with a total commitment value of US$3.65 billion in a variety of sectors including transport, urban, agriculture, water, education and health.

Continue Reading

Finance

ADB $300 Million Loan to Promote Macroeconomic Stability in Pakistan

Published

on

The Asian Development Bank (ADB) has approved a $300 million policy-based loan to help promote macroeconomic stability in Pakistan by facilitating improved trade competitiveness and export diversification.

“While COVID-19 hit Pakistan at a critical point in its macroeconomic recovery, the government’s ongoing efforts to ensure stability have started showing encouraging results this fiscal year,” said ADB Principal Public Management Specialist Hiranya Mukhopadhyay. “ADB’s program will support these efforts and help Pakistan to improve its export competitiveness—now more important than ever given the impacts of the pandemic.”

ADB’s program will help Pakistan recover its current account deficit in a sustained manner and continue to facilitate export diversification. It will introduce important tariff- and tax-related policy reforms to help improve Pakistan’s international competitiveness and further strengthen key institutions, including accreditation bodies, the Export–Import Bank of Pakistan, and the Pakistan Single Window.

The new financing falls under Subprogram 2 of the Trade and Competitiveness Program. Under the first phase, ADB helped the government usher in key reforms, including reducing or abolishing tariffs and ad hoc duties on a large number of raw materials and intermediate goods. Several steps were also taken to introduce e-commerce, strengthen key institutions involved in facilitating trade, and enhance the export certification process.

Since fiscal year 2004, Pakistan has registered a rise-and-fall pattern of export growth reflecting underperformance in its export industry and long-term decline in export competitiveness. This is compounded by lost export growth momentum from COVID-19, which has reduced high-income countries’ demand for manufacturing goods and disrupted the supply of raw materials.   

ADB is coordinating its efforts with other development partners and donors while the program complements International Monetary Fund-led reform initiatives by helping to improve competitiveness, which will help build robust foreign exchange reserves.

Continue Reading

Publications

Latest

Central Asia28 seconds ago

COVID-19 Prompts Urgency of Bridging Digital Divide in Central Asia

Almost half of the population in Central Asia is not digitally connected, missing out on employment opportunities, falling behind in learning and not receiving adequate...

Development2 hours ago

Building science, technology and innovation capacity in developing countries

The United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) is contributing to a series of online training courses and workshops to build...

East Asia4 hours ago

Europe 1914- East Asia 2020: Similarities and Differences

Many scholars argue that what is happening between the major powers in East Asia at the present time is what...

East Asia6 hours ago

Beijing pushes Hong Kong towards a drastic fait accompli

Hong Kong’s liberal democracy faces an existential threat, more visible than any time in the past 23 years, as exemplified...

Tech News8 hours ago

Fintechs See Increased Growth as Firms Adapt to COVID-19

The World Economic Forum has today released results of a study on how the fintech industry has been impacted by...

Europe10 hours ago

Digital COVID-19 vaccine passports have arrived- why they are a bad idea

With the arrival of the first batches ofCOVID-19 vaccines at various countries, there have been a number of statements by...

International Law12 hours ago

The Third Way for De-Binarization of Foreign Policy Conduct

As the present world order weakens, the mega confrontations have appeared more likely: On its post-Soviet revival quest, Russia becomes...

Trending