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New Social Compact

The Dilemma of Millenials Generation Political Empowerment

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There is a question for us together when looking at the millennial dilemma between empowerment and deprivation, where can millennial generation be found in the structure of social power relations? Although Foucalt once stated that power can be understood as suffusing all interpersonal interactions and discourses, millennial empowerment is analyzed in the context of power dynamics that enable and accelerate effective social action towards public good and justice. Understanding the power structures in which millennials operate is crucial to expressing their leadership potential and bringing transformational power to the global scene.

Empowerment construction is widely used in various fields, including organization and management, community psychology, and political behavior. Among its many manifestations, two in particular provide a conceptual framework that is useful for generation analysis. Referring to the Rappaport concept of empowerment with tiered application at three levels, namely individuals, organizations, and society. Empowerment here is considered as a deliberate action through people, organizations and communities in order to gain control over the problems they are worried about. Through a participatory and active empowerment process, millennial can maximize control over themselves and the environment, while simultaneously strengthening the efficacy of individuals and communities.

In this case, psychological empowerment at the individual level plays a central role and connects the processes through which individuals are empowered with the results of their empowerment experiences in the wider social arena. Empowerment shows that participation with others to achieve goals, efforts to gain access to resources, and some critical understanding of the socio-political environment is a basic component of the construct. Likewise, applying this general framework at the level of organizational analysis will show that empowerment includes organizational processes and structures that increase member participation and increase the achievement of organizational goals.

However, separation is naturally embedded in hierarchical power structures and various forms of organization of types of upper power, while democratic ideals promote the model of power coactively rather than coercive power. In modernity, democracy is often interpreted as a concern, with the voice rule to determine the will of the majority. As such, people’s power is the main authority. Therefore, the separation between political leaders and citizens has long been seen as a barrier in pursuing the ideals of democratic political leadership.

In the ideal version of democratic rhetoric, the system of representation must directly reflect the preferences of the masses. But the intersection between elite and representation in a democracy is actually very complicated by the limits of social consensus. The majority of citizens in Indonesian society only show superficial commitment to democratic norms and ideas, thus the political elite has long been seen as the main storehouse of democratic virtues. This view is firmly rooted in the early conceptualization of the republican order. The Greek concept of aristocracy refers to the best man rule. Plato justifies the influence of the ruling class which is not proportional to the assumption of superior guardian wisdom or virtue.

Political leadership too often is treated as an isolated factor depending on one individual, but practices in Indonesian government show it as part of a complex system and must be persuaded and manipulated to respond to the imperatives of political leaders. Separation as a prerequisite for leadership has become an area of ​​traditional authority-based relations between political leaders and followers. Many historical examples of separation present dependency relations, as in the case of the king in the Middle Ages and his people or commanders and soldiers, while the democratic model reverses this dependency relationship.

In the logic of political continuity, the authors suggest that voters as political power depend on satisfying the winning coalition of relevant voters. Leaders, as representatives of certain groups, depend on their votes and compete for the attention of voters. Symbolic or material distance, ritual characteristics and habits, are still associated with certain political positions, but the strategy that is seen as the most effective in mobilizing popular support is based on proximity. Political figures expose an unprecedented level of personal life in their willingness to show shared identity with citizens, shape their behavior and opinions to the tastes of ordinary people.

As a result of these changing conditions, the imaginary social millennial generation on the phenomenon of political leadership seems to be contested, while the leadership practices are considered valuable and necessary (for example community leadership, and engagement oriented towards social justice, human rights, development issues, etc.). Although some of us try to conceptualize the relationship between engagement and political violence, many aspects of this relationship are still unknown. A clear understanding of the difference between citizen engagement and willingness to consider politics as the best professional choice, eliminating some of the inconsistencies of the millennial generation profile.

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New Social Compact

Violence in schools leads to $11 trillion in lost lifetime earnings

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 A new report from the World Bank and the End Violence Partnership / Safe to Learn Global Initiative shows that violence in and around schools severely impacts educational outcomes, and society pays a heavy price as a result, with an estimated $11 trillion in lost lifetime earnings.

The study, Ending Violence in Schools: An Investment Case, which was released together with the new strategy of the Safe to Learn initiative, finds that violence in schools – including physical, emotional, and sexual violence – is widespread in most countries. It profoundly affects students’ experience in schools, leading to, among others, lower grades, more absence from schools, fewer friendships, and less trust in teachers. This contributes to children dropping out of school and learning less in school, leading, in turn, to losses in earnings in adulthood. Violence in schools also has a wide range of negative effects not only for mental health and psychological well-being, but also for multiple physical ailments. It is furthermore associated with risky behaviors, from using drugs and alcohol to having sex at a younger age.

“All the investments we make in education become irrelevant if children aren’t safe at school,” stressedJaime Saavedra, Global Director for Education, World Bank.“Preventing violence is not an easy public policy. It requires the complex interweaving of actions at the school, community, and national levels. To underpin this undertaking, it is essential that countries have the political will to drive change. The evidence from the Investment Case and collective action from partners will be key in driving this change.”

Violence in schools is pervasive, but rigorous evaluations of a range of interventions show that it can be reduced through innovative programs. Many tested programs have high benefits-to-cost ratios. This is, for example, the case for anti-bullying programs such as Olweus and KiVa.

“Ending violence in schools is possible, a smart investment, and there are proven interventions to do it.  We need to create a movement to make change happen, and Safe to Learn is there to catalyze and support action at scale,” emphasized Howard Taylor, Executive Director of the Global Partnership to End Violence Against Children.

To address this urgent issue, the report recommends interventions along the life cycle – starting in early childhood and continuing in primary and secondary schools. Many of those interventions have multiple benefits. For example, programs to boost socio-emotional learning improve students’ prosocial behaviors and learning. Collaborative learning techniques also improve students’ learning, relationships, and positive perceptions of themselves. In addition to particular interventions, national policies and “whole school” approaches are needed – one example is the Good School Toolkit in Uganda, which involves the whole school to promote behavioral change.

According to the report, ending violence in school is not only the right thing to do, it is also a smart investment. The data shows this in terms of the costs associated with violence in and around schools, but also in terms of multiple benefits for girls’ and boys’ learning, their well-being, and their future adult lives.

According to Saavedra, “Understanding the scope of the issue must push us all to renew our commitment to ensuring that all students have access to safe learning environments. This is an imperative if we are to collectively respond to the learning crisis. It won’t be solved if we don’t address in parallel the children’s rights crisis that the global pandemic has unveiled all around the world. With the Investment Case and the Safe to Learn Strategy never before have we been better prepared to respond to this pressing challenge.”

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New Social Compact

Demand for Investigation of COVID-19 gained momentum

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Human history is full of natural disasters like Earthquakes, Floods, Fires, Vacanos, Drought, Famine, Pandemic, etc. Some of them were really huge and have been damaged a lot. The outbreak of diseases was also very common in the past, like Spanish Flu, Tuberculosis, Cholera, Ebola, SARS, Middle-East-Virus, etc. However, the most damaging in recent history is COVID-19.

According to Worldometer, the latest data reveal that Coronavirus Cases has reached :

193,422,021, and death toll touched: 4,151,655. However, these are the official data provided by each individual country to Worldometer. The actual data is much more, as some countries have limited resources and could not test their population on a bigger scale, whereas few countries hide the actual data to save face, like India. Prime Minister Modi has mishandled the Pandemic and politicized it. His extremist approach toward minorities and political opponents has worsened the situation. He is afraid, if the public comes to know the actual disasters, he may lose political popularity and have to leave the office. Unofficial sources on groud estimate the actual figures are almost ten times higher. He has taken strict measures to hide the actual data and control media on reporting facts.

Whatever the actual data, even the official data shows a big disaster. Almost all nations became the victim of it and suffered heavily. The loss of human lives and the economic loss have made the whole World think seriously.

It is time to investigate the origin of COVID-19. There are many theories, and some are part of the blame game and politics, without proper investigations and reliable evidence. The World is so much polarized that it is very difficult to believe any side of the views and blames. Under this scenario, it is the World Health Organization (WHO) responsibility to conduct a transparent investigation and reach the source of COVID-19. It is believed that the whole World may trust WHO.

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian demanded on Wednesday that the United States show transparency and conduct a thorough investigation into its Fort Detrick laboratory and other biological labs overseas over the origins of COVID-19 in response to appeals from people in China and around the World. By Wednesday afternoon, an open letter published on Saturday asking the World Health Organization to probe Fort Detrick had garnered nearly 5 million signatures from Chinese netizens.

“The soaring number reflects the Chinese people’s demands and anger at some people in the US who manipulate the origin-tracing issue for political reasons,” Zhao said at a regular news briefing in Beijing.

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a “cease and desist order” in July 2019 to halt research at Fort Detrick that involved dangerous organisms like the Ebola virus. The same month, a “respiratory outbreak” of unknown cause saw more than 60 residents in a Northern Virginia retirement community become ill. Later that year, Maryland, where Fort Detrick is based, witnessed a doubling of the number of residents who developed a respiratory illness related to vaping.

But the CDC never released information about the shutdown of the lab’s deadly germ research operations, citing “national security reasons”. “An investigation into Fort Detrick is long-overdue, but the US has not done it yet, so the mystery remains unsolved,” Zhao said, adding that was a question the US must answer regarding the tracing of the origins of COVID-19.

There are 630,000 of its citizens lost to the Pandemic. The US should take concrete measures to investigate the origins of the virus at home thoroughly, discover the reason for its inadequate response to the Pandemic, and punish those who should be held accountable. Especially in the initial days, the mishandling of the Pandemic by then-President Trump was a significant cause of the rapidly spreading of the virus, which must be addressed adequately. Washington remains silent whenever Fort Detrick is mentioned. It seeks to stigmatize and demonize China under the pretext of origin-tracing.

It appealed that the WHO may come forward and conduct through research and investigation in a professional, scientific, and transparent manner to satisfy the whole World.

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New Social Compact

How to eliminate Learning Poverty

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Children learn more and are more likely to stay in school if they are first taught in a language that they speak and understand. Yet, an estimated 37 percent of students in low- and middle-income countries are required to learn in a different language, putting them at a significant disadvantage throughout their school life and limiting their learning potential. According to a new World Bank report Loud and Clear: Effective Language of Instruction Policies for Learning, effective language of instruction (LoI) policies are central to reducing Learning Poverty and improving other learning outcomes, equity, and inclusion.

Instruction unfolds through language – written and spoken – and children learning to read and write is foundational to learning all other academic subjects.  The Loud and Clear report puts it simply: too many children are taught in a language they don’t understand, which is one of the most important reasons why many countries have very low learning levels.

Children most impacted by such policies and choices are often disadvantaged in other ways – they are in the bottom 40 percent of the socioeconomic scale and live in more remote areas.  They also lack the family resources to address the effects of ineffective language policies on their learning. This contributes to higher dropout rates, repetition rates, higher Learning Poverty, and lower learning overall.

“The devastating impacts of COVID-19 on learning is placing an entire generation at risk,” says Mamta Murthi, World Bank Vice President for Human Development. “Even before the pandemic, many education systems put their students at a disadvantage by requiring children to learn in languages they do not know well – and, in far too many cases, in languages they do not know at all. Teaching children in a language they understand is essential to recover and accelerate learning, improve human capital outcomes, and build back more effective and equitable education systems.”

The new LoI report notes that when children are first taught in a language that they speak and understand, they learn more, are better placed to learn other languages, are able to learn other subjects such as math and science, are more likely to stay in school, and enjoy a school experience appropriate to their culture and local circumstances. Moreover, this lays the strongest foundation for learning in a second language later on in school. As effective LoI policies improve learning and school progression, they reduce country costs per student and, thus, enables more efficient use of public funds to enhance more access and quality of education for all children.

“The language diversity in Sub-Saharan Africa is one of its main features – while the region has 5 official languages, there are 940 minority languages spoken in Western and Central Africa and more than 1,500 in Sub-Saharan Africa, which makes education challenges even more pronounced,” says Ousmane Diagana, World Bank Regional Vice President for Western and Central Africa. “By adopting better language-of-instruction policies, countries will enable children to have a much better start in school and get on the right path to build the human capital they need to sustain long-term productivity and growth of their economies.” 

The report explains that while pre-COVID-19, the world had made tremendous progress in getting children to school, the near-universal enrollment in primary education did not lead to near-universal learning. In fact, before the outbreak of the pandemic, 53 percent of children in low- and middle-income countries were living in Learning Poverty, that is, were unable to read and understand an age-appropriate text by age 10. In Sub-Saharan Africa, the figure was closer to 90 percent. Today, the unprecedented twin shocks of extended school closures and deep economic recession associated with the pandemic are threatening to make the crisis even more dire, with early estimates suggesting that Learning Poverty could rise to a record 63 percent. These poor learning outcomes are, in many cases, a reflection of inadequate language of instruction policies.

“The message is loud and clear.  Children learn best when taught in a language they understand, and this offers the best foundation for learning in a second language,” stressed Jaime Saavedra, World Bank Global Director for Education. “This deep and unjust learning crisis requires action. Investments in education systems around the world will not yield significant learning improvements if students do not understand the language in which they are taught. Substantial improvements in Learning Poverty are possible by teaching children in the language they speak at home.”

The new World Bank policy approach to language of instruction is guided by 5 principles:

1. Teach children in their first language starting with Early Childhood Education and Care services through at least the first six years of primary schooling.

2. Use a student’s first language for instruction in academic subjects beyond reading and writing.

3.  If students are to learn a second language in primary school, introduce it as a foreign language with an initial focus on oral language skills.

4. Continue first language instruction even after a second language becomes the principal language of instruction.

5. Continuously plan, develop, adapt, and improve the implementation of language of instruction policies, in line with country contexts and educational goals.

Of course, these language of instruction policies need to be well integrated within a larger package of policies to ensure alignment with the political commitment and the instructional coherence of the system.

This approach will guide the World Bank’s financing and advisory support for countries to provide high-quality early childhood and basic education to all their students. The World Bank is the largest source of external financing for education in developing countries – in fiscal year 2021, it broke another record and committed $5.5 billion of IBRD and IDA resources in new operations and, in addition, committed $0.8 billion of new grants with GPE financing, across a total of 60 new education projects in 45 countries.

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