Connect with us

Finance

Top Paying Careers In Criminal Justice

Published

on

Crime is at large, now more than ever. We get to hear of unimaginably heinous misdeeds every day that can be nerve-wracking for the people who suffer from it. The motivations behind these actions could base on religion, race, ethnicity, nationality, gender, castes, and everything else that creates a bias in our society. The harsh reality is that it exists on every level and every scale, and people from all age groups and genders are equally prone to it.

Fortunately for us, we have adequate and competent law enforcement agencies to protect our interests and ensure the safety of our lives against these perpetrators. It might be risky, but is a highly noble profession that guarantees a respectable career. And with the development of proper governing bodies, this field has also adapted an efficient system to function with several branches.

Individuals who feel strongly about the security of others, or harbor a strong sense of morality readily line up to join this line of service. Besides securing the people from crimes, they also obtain a steady source of income for themselves. One with sufficient room for professional growth, although that is dependent upon the branch of law enforcement which they serve.

Choosing to pursue a career in this field can be a bold decision, but its many rewards make it worthwhile. If you can also see a future in this area, then here are the top-paying options that you should consider before picking any categories. These should help make your career even more exciting than it already could be.

1. DEA AGENTS

A DEA (Drug Enforcement Administration) agent works as part of a team that tackles drug trafficking and apprehends people involved in it. Because they deal with a range of tasks while performing their duties, a dea agent salary can be rather appealing for most people. Serving in this profession requires them to be proficient in several languages, have an apt understanding of body language, be remarkably flexible, and an expert in paying attention to details and decision making. You can expect an average yearly income between $60,000 and $90,000.

2. LAWYERS & ATTORNEYS

Criminal justice lawyers and attorneys can enjoy a comfortable living, thanks to the magnitude and abundance of cases for them in this area. They function by advising their clients in civil and criminal trials and informing them of the possible course of actions within their legal rights. Besides that, advocating before the court of law is a primary part of their job. They need to spend a total of seven years in undergrad and law school to consider bar exams and licensing for practicing. Upon completion, you can enjoy a yearly income of above $70,000.

3. DETECTIVE & PRIVATE INVESTIGATORS

This section of the criminal justice body specializes in active law enforcement practices and maintain order in a city. Detectives rank higher than police officers and work on solving specific cases by examining records, collecting evidence, and apprehending criminals. Most of them are advance from the position of a police officer by clearing specializing exams that test their physical and mental competence. Once they promote this level, they can get a salary of up to $90,000 in a year.

Private investigators offer similar services, but since they are not part of a system, they are more flexible with their work. They may be unlicensed and undertake all nature of cases. Thus, making them more suitable for private investigations.

4. POLICE OFFICERS

Police officers play a more significant role in the day to day activities of our lives. They maintain order, file reports, make arrests, apprehend offenders of the law, and respond to calls for individual assistance. Qualifying for this job requires them to clear training and pass several medical, physical, and written exams. After completing them, they can serve state or federal agencies following the defined code of law. You should expect to earn $40,000 to $60,000 a year. To get into a higher pay scale, try to apply getting done with your undergrad.

5. FEDERAL MARSHALS

Federal marshals perform a more narrow scope of duties. They are prominent members of the US government’s executive branch. Their job description involves providing adequate security to court officers and officials and ensuring the smooth functioning of the judicial system. Part of their job also requires them to convey and fulfill court orders, like arrest warrants or prisoner transfers. Individuals can join this field after completing a degree in criminal justice and three years of practice in this area. They are likely to start from a pay scale of above $38,000 a year.

6. FORENSICS ANALYSTS

Forensics analysts are the Sherlock Holmes of the world of criminal justice. They collect and analyze evidence related to criminal cases and make reasonable deductions or draw appropriate conclusions from their findings. They work closely with medical examiners, officers, and lab technicians to perform their duties. Exhibiting a sound understanding of ballistics, fingerprinting, biochemistry, and other implicit details of cases is essential for their jobs. People wanting to work in this branch need to complete a bachelor’s in criminal justice and get a forensic science specialization through enforcement agencies. They can start working with annual pay of $37,000 and expect gradual growth with time and experience.

7. PROBATION OFFICERS

Probation officers work on rehabilitating and reforming the lives of law offenders, convicts, and people still waiting for their sentencing. They supervise the activities of released criminals and run background checks on arrested individuals to help with the sentencing. A vital part of their job also involves providing recommendations on matters related to sentencing and reviewing court orders. They offer rehabilitation assistance and referrals to counseling, training, and community service programs for offenders. That makes their job rather important in intercepting and eliminating crime from our streets. These can start their careers from $35,000 and expect to go up to $60,000 a year with gradual growth.

8. COURT CLERKS

Court clerks provide clerical support with matters related to the municipality and court systems, as well as federal licensing agencies. They perform all the associated services and administrative duties for the judicial system. That involves issuing licenses, collecting fees, maintaining fiscal accounts, and verifying the propositions made in the court. They need to complete a 2-year associate degree and other technical programs from vocational schools. Depending on their performance, experience, and work, they can earn between $20,000 and $75,000 a year.

SUMMARY

These are top-paying career options in criminal justice that you need to consider for your future. Make sure to prepare for rigorous physical and mental exercise for all of them, as this field deals with everyone identically. Rest assured, you can envision a respectable and satisfying life ahead of you after joining this field.

Continue Reading
Comments

Finance

Albania Has Opportunity to Build a More Sustainable Growth Model

Published

on

Albania’s economy, like other countries in the region, is recovering faster than expected after the historic recession created by the COVID-19 pandemic. Following the contraction of the economy by 4 percent in 2020, GDP growth is projected to reach 7.2 percent in 2021, one of the highest among Western Balkans countries, says the latest edition of the Western Balkans Regular Economic Report, Greening the Recovery.

The strong recovery is supported by consumption, tourism, and construction. Going forward, growth is expected to moderate at 3.8 percent in 2022 and 3.7 percent in 2023.

Albania’s poverty rate is projected to fall below its pre-pandemic level by end-2021. Employment and labor force participation is also recovering, albeit with a lag, and real wages are increasing.

The recovery is contributing to fiscal revenue collection. Macroeconomic policies have supported the recovery, but higher spending has led to a further rise in the debt-to-GDP ratio. Economic uncertainty remains high, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues worldwide.

“The Albanian economy has shown encouraging signs of recovery in 2021,” said Emanuel Salinas, World Bank Country Manager for Albania. “As growth rebounds, Albania has the opportunity to strengthen the sustainability of its economic model and implement reforms that further support sustainable and shared growth, while preserving macroeconomic stability.”

The report shows that the Western Balkans region has improved significantly, with GDP growth now projected to reach 5.9 percent in 2021, after a 3.1 percent contraction in 2020. Growth in the region is projected at 4.1 percent in 2022 and 3.8 percent in 2023.

The poverty rate for the region is projected to resume its pre-pandemic downward trend and fall by around 1 percentage point to 20.3 percent, close to its 2019 level.

The regionwide recovery is due to strength in both domestic and external demand. A sharp rebound in domestic consumption and in travel across Europe helped boost remittances as well as tourism inflows during the 2021 peak summer season. A strong recovery in advanced economies also provided a boost to demand for the region’s exports.

However, the recovery remains fragile. Early warning signals from the labor market call for close policy attention. Job losses from the recession and its aftermath have disproportionately affected women and youth, which may set back efforts to raise the region’s perennially low rates of labor force participation. Youth unemployment in the region rose to 37.7 percent in 2021, up 5.4 percentage points from June 2020, further worsening youth employment prospects.

“As the Western Balkans countries look to a post-pandemic future, their policy approach will need to focus on addressing key impediments to job creation and economic transformation, including green transition,” said Linda Van Gelder, World Bank Country Director for the Western Balkans. “All six countries would benefit from reforms in the business environment, governance, and digitalization, which would contribute to growth and close the gap with EU countries.”

The report also looks at the macro-fiscal challenges and drivers of greening the region’s growth. The Western Balkans now find themselves at a key decision point regarding the impending green transition.

Global strides toward climate action are causing fundamental changes in society. Consumer and investor preferences are shifting, green technologies and new business models are disrupting more markets, and green policies are reshaping economic landscapes. As such, greening a country’s economy is becoming a decisive factor in international competitiveness and the ability to attract international finance and investments.

The Western Balkans are no exception. Still characterized by a development model tilted toward familiar brown industries, moving toward a green growth pathway is far from easy, especially in the short term. Yet, the green transition offers significant opportunities for the Western Balkans – including closer integration into Euro-centric global value chains and access to significant EU resources to help fund a green transition.

Effectively managing this green transition, including the many policy tradeoffs, will need to be a core focus of policy attention for the Western Balkans in the years ahead.

Continue Reading

Finance

Montenegro on Course for Stronger Economic Recovery in 2021

Published

on

The Western Balkans region is rebounding from the COVID-19-induced recession of 2020, thanks to a faster-than-expected recovery in 2021, says the latest edition of the Western Balkans Regular Economic Report, Greening the Recovery.

The outlook for the region has improved significantly, with GDP growth now projected to reach 5.9 percent in 2021, after a 3.1 percent contraction in 2020. Growth in the region is projected at 4.1 percent in 2022 and 3.8 percent in 2023.

Driven by a rapid recovery in tourism, Montenegro’s economy is projected to rebound strongly by an estimated 10.8 percent in 2021, the highest rate among the six Western Balkan countries. Strong peak summer season has supported a rebound in tourism revenues, which are likely to reach close to 75 percent of their 2019 levels, from 55 percent previously estimated.

The rebound of economic activity has boosted government revenues, which coupled with careful fiscal management have led to a reduction in fiscal deficit from 11 percent of GDP in 2020 to an estimated 4 percent in 2021. Maintaining fiscal prudence in the medium term will be critical, as uncertainties loom.

“The economic crisis brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic continues to be a source of uncertainty, but also presents an opportunity for Montenegro to ensure a resilient, inclusive, and green post-pandemic recovery,” says Christopher Sheldon, World Bank Country Manager for Bosnia and Herzegovina and Montenegro. “The World Bank is committed to helping Montenegro implement reforms that can help ensure macroeconomic stability, create economic opportunities, and spur strong private-sector led growth”.

The report finds that unemployment in Montenegro remains high as the recovery has not ignited the labor market yet, which limits the pace of resumed poverty reduction. Poverty is projected to decline slowly in 2021, but it remains higher than its 2019 level.

The poverty rate for the region is projected to resume its pre-pandemic downward trend and fall by around 1 percentage point to 20.3 percent, close to its 2019 level.

The regionwide recovery is due to strength in both domestic and external demand. A sharp rebound in domestic consumption and in travel across Europe helped boost remittances as well as tourism inflows during the 2021 peak summer season. A strong recovery in advanced economies also provided a boost to demand for the region’s exports.

However, the recovery remains fragile. Early warning signals from the labor market call for close policy attention. Job losses from the recession and its aftermath have disproportionately affected women and youth, which may set back efforts to raise the region’s perennially low rates of labor force participation. Youth unemployment rose to 37.7 percent in 2021, up 5.4 percentage points from June 2020, further worsening youth employment prospects.

“As the Western Balkans countries look to a post-pandemic future, their policy approach will need to focus on addressing key impediments to job creation and economic transformation, including green transition,” said Linda Van Gelder, World Bank Country Director for the Western Balkans. “All six countries would benefit from reforms in the business environment, governance, and digitalization, which would contribute to growth and close the gap with EU countries.”

The report also looks at the macro-fiscal challenges and drivers of greening the region’s growth. The Western Balkans now find themselves at a key decision point regarding the impending green transition.

Global strides toward climate action are causing fundamental changes in society. Consumer and investor preferences are shifting, green technologies and new business models are disrupting more markets, and green policies are reshaping economic landscapes. As such, greening a country’s economy is becoming a decisive factor in international competitiveness and the ability to attract international finance and investments.

The Western Balkans are no exception. Still characterized by a development model tilted toward familiar brown industries, moving toward a green growth pathway is far from easy, especially in the short term. Yet, the green transition offers significant opportunities for the Western Balkans – including closer integration into Euro-centric global value chains and access to significant EU resources to help fund a green transition.

Effectively managing this green transition, including the many policy tradeoffs, will need to be a core focus of policy attention for the Western Balkans in the years ahead.

Continue Reading

Finance

North Macedonia’s Growth Projected Higher, but Economy Still Faces Risks

Published

on

macedonia

The Western Balkans region is rebounding from the COVID-19-induced recession of 2020, thanks to a faster-than-expected recovery in 2021, says the latest edition of the Western Balkans Regular Economic Report, Greening the Recovery.

The outlook for the region has improved significantly, with GDP growth now projected to reach 5.9 percent in 2021, after a 3.1 percent contraction in 2020. Growth in the region is projected at 4.1 percent in 2022 and 3.8 percent in 2023.

The poverty rate for the region is projected to resume its pre-pandemic downward trend and fall by around 1 percentage point to 20.3 percent, close to its 2019 level.

The regionwide recovery is due to strength in both domestic and external demand. A sharp rebound in domestic consumption and in travel across Europe helped boost remittances as well as tourism inflows during the 2021 peak summer season. A strong recovery in advanced economies also provided a boost to demand for the region’s exports.

For North Macedonia, this translates into a growth projection of 4.6 percent for 2021, much higher than the forecast in spring. “This positive outlook is still surrounded by downside risks, with the pace of immunization low and supply chains still disrupted, while financial conditions have started tightening,” said Massimiliano Paolucci, World Bank Country Manager for North Macedonia and Kosovo.

However, the recovery remains fragile. Early warning signals from the labor market call for close policy attention. Job losses from the recession and its aftermath have disproportionately affected women and youth, which may set back efforts to raise the region’s perennially low rates of labor force participation. Youth unemployment rose to 37.7 percent in 2021, up 5.4 percentage points from June 2020, further worsening youth employment prospects.

“As the Western Balkans countries look to a post-pandemic future, their policy approach will need to focus on addressing key impediments to job creation and economic transformation, including green transition,” said Linda Van Gelder, World Bank Regional Director for the Western Balkans. “All six countries would benefit from reforms in the business environment, governance, and digitalization, which would contribute to growth and close the gap with EU countries.”

The report also looks at the macro-fiscal challenges and drivers of greening the region’s growth. The Western Balkans now find themselves at a key decision point regarding the impending green transition.

Global strides toward climate action are causing fundamental changes in society. Consumer and investor preferences are shifting, green technologies and new business models are disrupting more markets, and green policies are reshaping economic landscapes. As such, greening a country’s economy is becoming a decisive factor in international competitiveness and the ability to attract international finance and investments.

The Western Balkans are no exception. Still characterized by a development model tilted toward familiar brown industries, moving toward a green growth pathway is far from easy, especially in the short term. Yet, the green transition offers significant opportunities for the Western Balkans – including closer integration into Euro-centric global value chains and access to significant EU resources to help fund a green transition.

Effectively managing this green transition, including the many policy tradeoffs, will need to be a core focus of policy attention for the Western Balkans in the years ahead.

Continue Reading

Publications

Latest

Defense5 mins ago

US Targets Militants in Turkish-Held Area in Syria

Central Command spokesman Army Major John Rigsbee announced on Friday, October 23, the killing of senior al-Qaeda leader Abdul Hamid...

Development2 hours ago

Multilateralism ‘struggling’ to solve world challenges

While multilateralism remains “committed to solving global challenges”, the deputy UN chief said on Sunday, United Nations Day, it is...

Tech News3 hours ago

Do You Really Need Name-Brand Cartridges?

Cartridges from printer manufacturers like Hewlett-Packard are notoriously expensive.  Considering the price of their basic equipment, ink may cost almost...

Americas4 hours ago

General Colin Powell: A Decent Man in Indecent Society

Theologian Reinhold Niebuhr’s (1892-1932) famous treatise Moral Man and Immoral Society (1932) needs significant revisitation through a personal case: former...

International Law6 hours ago

Support the UN’s leadership position and multilateralism

Despite its inability to fully satisfy people’s expectations on some issues, the United Nations and its agencies, as well as...

Terrorism8 hours ago

Taliban Takeover and Resurgence of Al-Qaeda in Afghanistan

As a Security and International Relations student and someone who lived in Afghanistan, I believe that the withdrawal of the...

Intelligence10 hours ago

Israel-Bhutan peace agreement and its affect on China’s influence

First: The relationship between (political normalization agreements between Israel and the Emirates and the State of Bhutan or the Kingdom...

Trending