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Tips on saving money when buying a pre-registered car

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With the hefty price tags and high depreciation rates, it is no surprise that drivers are leaning towards secondhand cars more instead of brand new ones. According to experts, certain models can drop in value for up to 35% in the first year. Though the statistics reveal a pretty disheartening number, there are still ways in which you can fulfill your dream of getting a brand new pre-registered car of your own, while saving some coins during the process. And while we are on the topic of getting a new car, make sure to not forget to get your car protected by insurance at https://www.youi.com.au/car-insurance.

What are pre-registered cars?

In order to understand what pre-registered cars are, we first have to go back to the basics. A car dealer measures his success based on the number of sales that he or she makes, and like other salesmen, they also have targets to meet. In order to achieve their quotas, dealerships will sometimes opt for buying the cars themselves and register them as sold with the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA). These will then be known as pre-registered cars. Since the first owner of the car is technically registered with the dealer, these cars are classified as secondhand cars, despite its low mileage and it being just a few weeks old.

Pre-registering new cars, and then selling them at a lower price to customers does not necessarily mean that dealers are losing money. The manufacturer’s bonuses are usually able to cover the costs and at times outweigh the difference in costs.

When should I get a pre-registered car?

A rule of thumb is to wait till March or September, because those are the periods when new number plates are registered, with the largest supply of cars available. Those months also come with higher quotas for dealerships, making it easier to get a better deal. If you want to take advantage of cheap deals, be sure to visit the dealerships at the end of the month, as they usually have monthly and quarterly targets to hit as well. However, if you have some extra cash lying around, you can just proceed with getting a car whenever you need it. With a higher budget, you will also have the luxury of picking something that attracts you, as well as focusing on the functionality of the car.

When you are at the dealership, a tip is to look out for cars with the sign that says “new” and is heavily discounted but is already attached to a number plate. These are the cars that are most likely pre-registered, and you’ll pay significantly lower prices for them.

What can I expect with a pre-registered car?

When getting a pre-registered car instead of a brand new car, you can expect discounts from 5% to 15%, though the prices may vary depending on each model, and how desperate the dealership is to get the car off the forecourt. However, one thing to take note of is that if you think about finances, the retail price that pre-registered cars are discounted at may not mean lower monthly installment payments. You should also lookout for the miles on the clock. Most pre-registered cars should have less than 200 ‘delivery’ miles unless it has been used as a demonstrator car, which can hit slightly above 200. It should also typically be under six months old and check with the dealership if it is a lot older than that.

What should I look out for when purchasing a pre-registered car?

Before you immediately say “I do” to your car, it is best to do some research on the model in question. If you realize that it has to be replaced or facelifted soon, this gives you a great opportunity to further haggle over the price. Furthermore, you should ensure that you receive the new keeper supplement section of its V5C logbook and the sales receipt when the dealer sends it to the DVLA.

Moreover, you should take out GAP (Guaranteed Asset Protection) insurance if you are getting a pre-registered vehicle. This is because your insurer will likely pay out the car’s market value before any accident since you are the second registered keeper of the car. This ensures that the GAP policy will compensate for any potential shortfall in price between this amount and the amount that you owe the finance company.

What are the cons of getting a pre-registered car?

One of the biggest drawbacks of getting a pre-registered car is the value that it can be sold for when you decide to change your car. Even though it is practically new and you are the first legitimate owner of the car, you are still technically the second owner, thus making its value decrease when you decide to sell it. This will not fetch you the price at which your car is truly valued, causing you to make a potential loss. However, if you do not plan to sell it before the car has to go to the scrapyard, getting a pre-registered car will definitely be worth your buck.

Additionally, you have to take note of the manufacturer’s warranty. The warranty period starts the minute the car is parked in the forecourt. Hence, the longer the duration of the car idling in the forecourt, the shorter the warranty available for your car. This is different from that of a brand new car, whereby the warranty starts the moment you get the keys. This puts you at a slight disadvantage, risking the chances of a faulty part after the warranty has ended.

For drivers who prefer to customize and optimize a car to their liking, pre-registered cars are not the most suitable due to them being already fitted with optional extras. Furthermore, drivers are unable to choose and customize the spec as well.

Final Words

When it comes to purchasing a pre-registered car, it is all about slashing the prices further but getting the same standard and ideal condition that brand new cars have to offer. Though you are the first owner to drive on the roads, you are technically the second owner on paper. Hence, it will prove to be a problem when you choose to sell it, as your car will have a lower resale value than what it is actually worth. Despite that, getting a pre-registered car can help you reduce costs by up to 15%, while not compromising on the performance of the car.

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Global value chains in the aftermath of the pandemic: What role for the G20?

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Can embedding inclusive and sustainable transformation at the core of multilateral efforts help ensure that countries benefit from integration in global value chains (GVCs)? This was the question addressed by a stellar line-up of speakers brought together for a webinar organized by the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), together with the International Affairs Institute (IAI) and in cooperation with the Kiel Institute for the World Economy and the German Institute for Global Area Studies.

In the framework of the T20 Spring Roundtables, the virtual event brought together more than 200 participants worldwide. The discussion focused on inclusiveness and sustainability in global value chains in the aftermath of the coronavirus disruptions, and served as a platform to develop ideas and recommendations for the G20.

UNIDO’s Director General, LI Yong, said that to build back better, “we can stimulate inclusiveness by focusing our policy efforts on building state-of-the-art capabilities in small and medium-sized enterprises (…) and sustainability through smart regulation, including a new generation of trade and investment agreements.” Moreover, he stressed the need “to increase our joint efforts towards strengthening multilateral approaches to policymaking.

Pier Carlo Padoan, the Vice President of the IAI and T20 Italy Lead Co-Chair of Task Force 3: Trade, Investment and Growth, echoed the sentiment and brought the focus onto how we can strengthen the backbone of global value chains, and reaffirmed that “the G20 must retain its leadership in building up a new paradigm of sustainable growth,” despite the deep flaws and scars created by the coronavirus crisis in the current system.

“Making global supply chains fair and sustainable is a task in which policymakers and private enterprises have to engage,” said Norbert Barthle, Parliamentary State Secretary in Germany’s Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development. He said Germany’s Due Diligence Act is looking to address these challenges holistically by ensuring higher social standards in global value chains, leveling the playing field, and enhancing transparency in supply chains.

When looking at the playing field, buyers and suppliers find themselves in uneven positions, depending on the governance landscape. In this context, Beata Javorcik, Chief Economist of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), underlined that “we need clear messaging about commitments to sustainability, we need to reduce information asymmetries,” as this will enhance the inclusiveness of global value chains, allowing for firms of all sizes to engage with and participate in global trade.

Diving deeper into global trade, Pamela Coke-Hamilton, the Executive Director of the International Trade Centre, highlighted the importance of ensuring transparency and predictability for greater participation of small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) in global value chains. Coke-Hamilton said this can be achieved by mainstreaming and facilitating compliance with international standards, supporting innovation and digital technologies, and promoting sustainability.

Marco Felisati, Business 20 Sherpa and Confindustria’s Deputy Director of Internationalization and Trade Policy, echoed the panel’s view that “there is no trade-off between competitiveness and sustainability.” He highlighted that “on the contrary, complying with high sustainability factors is a competitiveness factor, and being competitive is a prerequisite for GVCs to be sustainable and inclusive.”

Mario Cimoli, Deputy to the Executive Secretary of the Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC), reaffirmed that “manufacturing continues to be crucial.” He said in Latin America the pandemic has highlighted that manufacturing remains a key issue, as it is the only way “to expand industry, create diversification, and to sustain wages.”

 As many countries are opening up again after a year of restrictions, speakers agreed that the time is now to look beyond the pandemic and focus on ensuring that global value chains become more inclusive and sustainable. The panel agreed that international coordination through multilateral bodies such as the G20 will be vital in moving forward.   

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World Bank Supports Croatia’s Firms Hit by COVID-19 Pandemic

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photo: World Bank

Tamara Perko, President of the Management Board of the Croatian Bank for Reconstruction and Development (HBOR) and Elisabetta Capannelli, World Bank Country Manager for Croatia, signed a Loan Agreement for the HEAL Croatia Project (Helping Enterprises Access Liquidity) in the amount of EUR 200 million (US$242 million equivalent). The Croatian Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance, Zdravko Marić also signed a Guarantee Agreement with the Bank for the Loan. The HEAL Croatia Project will provide liquidity and financial restructuring to firms that have been hit by the COVID-19 pandemic and by the two devastating earthquakes of 2020 and will support an inclusive and resilient recovery.  

The COVID-19 crisis has caused a sharp decline in the economic activity of Croatian businesses and has had a profound effect on jobs and livelihoods. The pandemic disrupted firms’ production and reduced the demand for their goods and services, while the financial sector tightened lending to companies, due to rising credit risk. The crisis also exacerbated Croatia’s regional disparities and reduced credit access for young firms and for firms owned and managed by women.

To mitigate such negative effects, the HEAL Project will increase access to finance to firms focused on export, both small and medium enterprises (firms employing fewer than 250 people) and mid-caps firms (employing from 250 to 3000 people), as well as for firms from less developed regions of Croatia, and firms owned or managed by women. It will also increase access for young enterprises (operating less than five years). The Project will support HBOR’s continued development through improved business processes, strengthened sustainability and climate change resilience, and use of EU funds.

“The loan being signed today represents a continuation of the significant support provided by the World Bank to the Republic of Croatia since the beginning of the crisis in 2020, which is reflected in operations worth a total of EUR 760 million (including HEAL). With this project, we are contributing to the further recovery of Croatia’s private sector, following the existing measures of the Government of the Republic of Croatia adopted in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, post-earthquake reconstruction and creating foundations for future sustainability and resilience,” said Zdravko Marić, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance of the Republic of Croatia.

“Terms and conditions granted by the World Bank will provide us an additional source of finance for granting further favorable loans to our entrepreneurs. We are pleased that the World Bank has recognized the significance of financing entrepreneur groups whose importance has also been recognized in HBOR’s five-year strategy. Exporters and entrepreneurs in underdeveloped areas are among them. In addition to granting favorable financing terms, the World Bank will support us in improving our Environmental and Social Management System. This will be important as HBOR’s activities in the coming period will be particularly committed to building more capacity for supporting sustainable projects and inclusive growth,” stated Tamara Perko, President of the Management Board of HBOR.

“We look forward to a smooth and quick implementation of the HEAL Croatia project which will help preserve jobs and support household livelihoods through direct support to approximately 150 firms employing around 25,000 people. The Project will contribute to a resilient, inclusive and sustainable recovery of Croatia, which has been hard hit by the global pandemic, the economic recession, and the devastating earthquakes of March and December 2020,” said Elisabetta Capannelli, the World Bank Country Manager for Croatia.

The HEAL Croatia project complements two other World Bank crisis operations approved last year, the Croatia Crisis Response and Recovery Program and Earthquake Recovery and Public Health Preparedness Project – worth together US$ 500 million, to help mitigate the effects of the economic shock, advance recovery, facilitate earthquake reconstruction and strengthen national systems for public health preparedness for pandemic outbreaks. The Justice for Business Project focused on improving the business regulatory procedures and justice service standards for businesses and citizens was also approved in March 2020, bringing the World Bank support to the country to EUR 760 million under the ongoing Country Partnership Framework.

The World Bank has been a partner to Croatia for over 27 years. During this period, the Bank has supported more than 50 projects, worth almost US$5 billion, produced numerous studies, and provided technical assistance to help strengthen institutions and support the design of policies and strategies. The Bank’s current program focuses on mitigating the economic and social impact of COVID-19, post-earthquake reconstruction, transport, justice, innovation, business environment, land administration, science and technology, and economic development of the Pannonian region.

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Decentralized Finance heats up: new approaches needed for industry transformation

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Decentralized finance (DeFi) aims to transform traditional forms of finance by reconstructing and reimagining services. The World Economic Forum today released the Decentralized Finance (DeFi) Policy-Maker Toolkit, providing policy-makers and regulators with guidance for technologies that are global and transforming rapidly.

The toolkit is a collaboration with the Blockchain and Digital Asset Project at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. It draws on contributions from an international expert group of academics, legal practitioners, DeFi entrepreneurs, technologists, global policy-makers and regulators, and is the second report in the series, after DeFi Beyond the Hype.

DeFi has been evolving since the launch of the Ethereum blockchain in 2015 and is a category of financial services based on blockchain’s distributed ledger technology. It does not rely on central institutions, and interest has risen sharply from both private and public sectors.

The report notes that, in the past year, the value of digital assets locked in DeFi smart contracts grew by a factor of 18, from $670 million to $13 billion. The number of associated user wallets grew by a factor of 11, from 100,000 to 1.2 million, and the number of DeFi-related applications grew from eight to more than 200.

The first-of-its-kind toolkit provides a foundation for understanding the major factors that should drive policy-making decisions. It provides an overview of DeFi, explores and illustrates benefits and risks with case studies, and maps out legal and regulatory responses.

Representatives from governments around the world contributed to the creation of the toolkit, including those developing Europe’s Markets in Crypto-assets (MiCA) framework and major U.S. financial regulators. The government of Colombia is among those planning to use the toolkit in their policy-making and regulations.

“We are in a critical time for DeFi. Following its rapid growth, and the price activity in crypto more generally, governments are closely watching cryptocurrencies and decentralized applications,” said Sheila Warren, Deputy Head of the Centre for the Fourth Industrial Revolution Network; Executive Committee, World Economic Forum. “This toolkit is a critical first step in helping policy-makers and regulators navigate this quickly evolving space. By outlining the potential risks, while highlighting the opportunities for innovation, we hope it will be a valuable resource in informing balanced approaches to policies and regulations.”

“DeFi has transformative potential for financial services worldwide but also creates an array of serious concerns,” said Kevin Werbach, Director of the Blockchain and Digital Asset Project at Wharton. “Policy-makers and regulators need frameworks to address these issues responsibly. The toolkit provides that roadmap.”

“DeFi presents a generational expansion of financial opportunity (and always accompanying risk). The most important first step before any regulatory or policy undertaking is to level-set on the evolving landscape,” said Michael Mosier, Acting Director of the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) in the United States. “This report helpfully provides us with a thoughtful, clear and comprehensive cartography of DeFi so that we can make the most of truly innovative opportunities for financial expansion and novel risk mitigation.”

“We have been following the evolution of Crypto and DeFi and decided to take an active role in developing our policies in this field due to the opportunities it could unleash for our people,” said Jehudi Castro Sierra, Digital Transformation Advisor, Presidency of Colombia. “We were pleased to contribute to the toolkit and we are looking forward to using it to inform approaches to this space that are balanced, risk-aware, and forward looking. As the first country in the region to use the Policy-Maker Toolkit, we aim to be the leader in Latin America for DeFi policies and regulation.”

Authors call for technologically neutral approaches that can balance objectives of regulatory regimes and innovation and market development with policies that are fair, efficient and enforceable. Effective regulations should involve a combination of existing, retrofitted, new and bespoke regulations.

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