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International Law

Melting Ice on the Roof of the World: Opportunities and Dilemmas in the Arctic Ocean

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For centuries humanity has relied upon the ocean for its evolution and sustenance: be it the medium of exploring new lands as done so by the likes of Christopher Columbus and Vasco Da Gama to the eternal graves of countless warriors as a result of numerous battles fought on its surface and the extraction of riches which lay beneath those ocean floor graves. Perhaps most importantly it is the convenience of its nature which made it most favorable for commerce, being able to handle sails on top of wooden masts to contemporary container ships weighing in the thousands of tons. However one piece of oceanic real estate had not received an equal share of human meddling as compared to its counterparts: The Arctic Ocean.

The Arctic for centuries had enveloped itself in what seemed to be an everlasting blanket of its massive ice pack protecting its waters from human interference. Though not directly interfered with but indirectly human activities over and beyond the past century which have resulted in global warming resulting in environmental changes opening up this un-touched frontier. The National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration NOAA has illustrated constant decrease in the extent of Arctic ice over the past century. NASA reports that the Arctic has lost 54,000 square kilometers of ice for each year since the late 1970s.It has majorly been the harsh geography of this Northern polar circle that proved to be an obstacle towards it exploitation. At the rate the icepack is melting into its untapped waters, the Arctic Ocean is no longer bound to be an un-disturbed entity enjoying self-isolation, instead on the road to becoming a more globalized space. 

According to predictions, by 2040 the summer season in the Arctic Circle will be ice free and by 2050 ice free conditions will prevail all year round. Ice free waters mean signify the potential for resource exploitation, a 2008 Geological Survey conducted by US government in the Arctic Circle presented as assessed 13 percent of global undiscovered oil resources (90billion barrels) and 30 percent of global undiscovered natural gas reserves (1.669 trillion cubic feet), with 84 percent being offshore. Not only are Arctic natural resources limited too oil and natural gas, Admiral (retired) James Stavridis USN values resources such as nickel, platinum, cobalt, manganese, gold, zinc, palladium, lead, diamonds, and rare earth metals in the Arctic at about a trillion dollars.

Ice free waters in Arctic also open up new avenues for commercial maritime traffic in terms of passageways. The two most significant transit routes are the North West Passage and Northern Sea Route. The North West Passage navigates through the Canadian archipelago in the northern territories of Canada, providing an alternate route to the Panama Canal for Pacific-Atlantic voyage. When the first cargo shipped voyaged without any icebreaker assistance through the North West Passage for a journey from Canada to China, it was reportedly 40 percent shorter in terms of distance than opting for the Panama Canal. As for the a journey on the Northern Sea Route requires circumnavigation of the entire Russian coastline & Scandinavian territories for Europe- East Asia journey cutting travel time by 10-15 days as compared to navigating via the Suez Canal.

Exciting opportunities breed dilemmas, and in the affairs of the Arctic they are countless. Ranging from territorial claims, globalizing, to freedom of navigation, at risk indigenous populations and environment. To begin with, confusion still prevails who controls how much and what part of the Arctic. There are 6 Arctic states: Norway, United States, Canada, Iceland, Russia, and Denmark (via its territory of Greenland). Apart from minor overlapping claim of exclusive economic zones of Canada and US, the major dispute is centered on Russia, Canada and Denmark all of whom claim territory up till and beyond the North Pole from their borders (and EEZs). With the ocean slowly peaking from beneath the ice pack and an ever increasing pace. Such disputes if not resolved will eventually effect the stability and peaceful co-existence in the Arctic as a whole. Apart from the existing ruckus, the inclusion of China as an Arctic council observer followed by its recent Arctic Policy tilts the Arctic towards a great power wrestling ring. China’s Arctic policy clearly denotes China as a “near Arctic state” and its goals as to “understand, protect, develop and participate in the governance of the Arctic”. With the opportunities which lie in the region, every state who possesses the ability would cherish having a stake. The affairs of the Arctic for the future will be more globalized, way beyond the chilly confines of its current physical stakeholders.

As melting ice opens up new routes for maritime trade, the status of Arctic shipping routes is also being cast in doubts. The United States has disputed Canadian claims and sovereignty over the North West Passage terming it as an international strait, whereas Canada terms its internal waters. More recently the Arctic Council summit of 2019, United States Secretary of State Mike Pompeo apart from reiterating US position on North West Passage also implied the Northern Sea Route comprising of international waters upon which Russia is making illegitimate claims. The doubts being propagated over shipping routes are bound only to incite politico-diplomatic tensions. Melting ice as a result of climate change has put centuries old life style of indigenous people at risk. In the Arctic Report Card 2019 published by National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration one particular section highlight the plight faced by the indigenous populations: separation of ice packs from population settlements also attracts the wildlife which lives on them and warming waters diminishes fish population for which they rely upon as food sources. Ice based travelling routes have been restricted in time durations due to ice melting and delayed freeze up, un-predictable wind patterns and sea erosion as a result of melting ice. As maritime traffic increases (commercial, leisure, research, military) in the Arctic Ocean, impacts on marine environment derived from shipping such as noise pollution, accidental spills, operational spills and emission of pollutants in atmosphere.

Developments in the Arctic have not been completely in disregard of its local ecosystem, mechanism such as the Polar Code: protocols for ships sailing in polar waters to minimize environmental damage and adequate safety, inclusion of representation from Indigenous population in the Arctic Council which is a prime multi-lateral body for Arctic cooperation. There has been no shortage of corporation in regards to sustainable developments in the Arctic, but the real question comes down to enforcement and compromise; how will ships be monitored in vast Arctic waters where from discharging any pollutants? How can we be certain that interest of indigenous people will not be overlooked to serve the interests of powerful state actors? How can we bring every country on agreeing to mutually agreed EEZs and territorial waters? As long as Arctic stakeholders are willing to compromise for greater good and enforce existing mechanism whole heartedly only then we can see a sustainably developing Arctic ocean and region overall.

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International Law

Carl Schmitt for the XXI Century

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For decades, the scholars of international relations have confused the term “New World order” in the social, political, or economic spheres. Even today, few scholars confuse the term with the information age, internet, universalism, globalization, and  American imperialism. Unlike the complex categorization of the New World Order, the concept of the Old World Order was purely a juridical phenomenon. However, from standpoint of modernity, the term New World order is a purely ideological and political phenomenon, which embodies various displays such as liberal democracy, financial capitalism, and technological imperialism.

In his Magnus Opus “The concept of the Political”, Carl Schmitt lauded a harsh criticism on liberal ideology and favored competitive decisionism over it. This is why according to Schmitt’s critics; the whole text in “The concept of the political” is filled with authoritarian overtones. Nonetheless, the fact cannot be denied that it was the radical political philosophy of Carl Schmitt that paved the way for the conservative revolution in Europe. Even today, his writings are being regarded as one of the major contributions to the field of political philosophy from the 20th century.

Throughout his major works such as “Nomos of the earth”, “the Crisis of Parliamentary democracy”, “The concept of the Political” and “Dictatorship”, Carl Schmitt frequently employs unadorned terms such as ‘actual’, ‘concrete’, ‘real’, and ‘specific’ to apprize his political ideas. However, he advances most of the core political ideas by using the metaphysical framework. For instance, in the broader political domain, Carl Schmitt anticipated the existential dimension of the ‘actual politics’ in the world today.

On the contrary, in his famous work “The Concept of the Political” readers most encounter the interplay between the abstract and ideal and, the concrete and real aspects of politics. Perhaps, understanding of Schmitt’s discursive distinctions is necessary when it comes to the deconstruction of the liberal promoted intellectual discourse. However, the point should be kept in mind that for Schmitt the concept of the political does not necessarily refer to any concrete subject matter such as “state” or “sovereignty”. In this respect, his concept of the political simply refers to the friend-enemy dialectics or distinction. To be more precise, the categorization of the term “Political” defines the degree of intensity of an association and dissociation.

In addition, the famous friend-enemy dialectics is also the central theme of his famous book “The Concept of the Political”. Likewise, the famous friend-enemy distinction in Schmitt’s famous work has both concrete and existential meaning. Here, the word “enemy” refers to the fight against ‘human totality”, which depends upon the circumstances. In this respect, throughout his work, one of the major focuses of Carl Schmitt was on the subject of  “real Politics”. According to Schmitt, friend, enemy, and battle have real meaning. This is why, throughout his several works; Carl Schmitt remained much concerned with the theory of state and sovereignty. As Schmitt writes;

I do not say the general theory of the state; for the category, the general theory of the state…is a typical concern of the liberal nineteenth century. This category arises from the normative effort to dissolve the concrete state and the concrete Volk in generalities (general education, general theory of the law, and finally general theory of the knowledge; and in this way to destroy their political order”.[1]

As a matter of the fact, for Schmitt, the real politics ends up in battle, as he says, “The normal proves nothing, but the exception proves everything”. Here, Schmitt uses the concept of “exceptionality” to overcome the pragmatism of Liberalism. Although, in his later writings, Carl Schmitt attempted to dissociate the concept of “Political” from the controlling and the limiting spheres but he deliberately failed. One of the major reasons behind Schmitt’s isolation of the concept of the political is that he wanted to limit the categorization of friend-enemy distinction. Another major purpose of Schmitt was to purify the concept of the “Political” was by dissociating it from the subject-object duality. According to Schmitt, the concept of the political was not a subject matter and has no limit at all. Perhaps, this is why Schmitt advocated looking beyond the ordinary conception and definition of politics in textbooks.

For Schmitt, it was Liberalism, which introduced the absolutist conception of politics by destroying its actual meaning. In this respect, he developed his very idea of the “Political” against the backdrop of the “human totality” (Gesamtheit Von Menschen). Today’s Europe should remember the bloody revolutionary year of 1848 because the so-called economic prosperity, technological progress, and the self-assured positivism of the last century have come together to produce long and deep amnesia. Nonetheless, the fact cannot be denied that the revolutionary events of1848 had brought deep anxiety and fear for the ordinary Europeans. For instance, the famous sentence from the year 1848 reads;

For this reason, fear grabs hold of the genius at a different time than it does normal people. the latter recognizes the danger at the time of danger; up to that, they are not secure, and if the danger has passed, then they are secure. The genius is the strongest precisely at the time of danger”.

Unfortunately, it was the intellectual predicament at the European stage in the year 1848 that caused revolutionary anxiety and distress among ordinary Europeans. Today, ordinary Europeans face similar situations in the social, political, and ideological spheres. The growing anxieties of the European public consciousness cannot be grasped without taking into account Carl Schmitt’s critique of liberal democracy. A century and a half ago, by embracing liberal democracy under the auspices of free-market capitalism, the Europeans played a pivotal role in the self-destruction of the European spirit.

The vicious technological drive under liberal capitalism led the European civilization towards crony centralism, industrialism, mechanization, and above all singularity. Today, neoliberal capitalism has transformed the world into a consumer-hyped mechanized factory in which humanity appears as the by-product of its own artificial creation. The unstructured mechanization of humanity in the last century has brought human civilization to technological crossroads. Hence, the technological drive under liberal democratic capitalism is presenting a huge threat to human civilizational identity.


[1] Wolin, Richard, Carl Schmitt, Political Existentialism, and the Total State, Theory and Society, volume no. 19, no. 4, 1990 (pp. 389-416). Schmitt deemed the friend-enemy dialectics as the cornerstone of his critique on liberalism and universalism.

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International Law

Democratic Backsliding: A Framework for Understanding and Combatting it

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Democracy is suffering setbacks around the world. Over the past decade, the number of liberal democracies has shrunk from 41 to 32. Today, 34 percent of the global population lives in 25 countries moving in the direction of autocracy. By contrast, only 16 countries are undergoing a process of democratization, representing just 4 percent of the global population. Reflecting these troubling trends, USAID Administrator Samantha Power, during her confirmation hearing, highlighted democratic backsliding – along with climate change, conflict and state collapse, and COVID-19 – as among the “four interconnected and gargantuan challenges” that will guide the Biden Administration’s development priorities.

However, defining “democratic backsliding” is far from straightforward. Practitioners and policymakers too often refer to “democratic backsliding” broadly, but there is a high degree of variation in how backsliding manifests in different contexts. This imprecise approach is problematic because it can lead to an inaccurate analysis of events in a country and thereby inappropriate or ineffective solutions.

To prevent or mitigate democratic backsliding, policymakers need a definition of the concept that captures its multi-dimensional nature. It must include the actors responsible for the democratic erosion, the groups imperiled by it, as well as the allies who can help reverse the worst effects of backsliding. 

To address this gap, the International Republican Institute developed a conceptual framework to help practitioners and policymakers more precisely define and analyze how democratic backsliding (or “closing democratic space”) is transpiring and then devise foreign assistance programs to combat it.  Shifting away from broad generalizations that a country is moving forward or backward vis-à-vis democracy—which makes it difficult, if not impossible, to derive specific solutions—the framework breaks closing democratic space into six distinct, and sometimes interrelated, subsectors or “spaces.”

Political/Electoral: Encompasses the arena for political competition and the ability of citizens to hold their government accountable through elections. Examples of closing political or electoral space range from fraudulent election processes and the arrest or harassment of political leaders to burdensome administrative barriers to political party registration or campaigning.

Economic: Refers to the relationship between a country’s economic market structure, including access and regulation, and political competition. Examples of closing economic space include selective or politically motivated audits or distribution of government licenses, contracts, or tax benefits.

Civic/Associational: Describes the space where citizens meet to discuss and/or advocate for issues, needs, and priorities outside the purview of the government. Examples of closing civic or associational space include harassment or co-optation of civic actors or civil society organizations and administrative barriers designed to hamper civil society organizations’ goals including limiting or making it arduous to access resources.

Informational: Captures the venues that afford citizens the opportunity to learn about government performance or hold elected leaders to account, including the media environment and the digital realm. h. Examples of closing informational space consist of laws criminalizing online speech or activity, restrictions on accessing the internet or applications, censorship (including self-censorship), and editorial pressure or harassment of journalists.  

Individual: Encapsulates the space where individuals, including public intellectuals, academics, artists, and cultural leaders– including those traditionally marginalized based on religious, ethnicity, language, or sexual orientation–can exercise basic freedoms related to speech, property, movement, and equality under the law. Common tactics of closing individual space include formal and informal restrictions on basic rights to assemble, protest, or otherwise exercise free speech; censorship, surveillance, or harassment of cultural figures or those critical of government actions; and scapegoating or harassing identity groups.

Governing: Comprises the role of state institutions, at all levels, within political processes. Typical instances of closing the governing space include partisan control of government entities such as courts, election commissions, security services, regulatory bodies; informal control of such governing bodies through nepotism or patronage networks; and legal changes that weaken the balance of powers in favor of the executive branch.

Examining democratic backsliding through this framework forces practitioners and policymakers to more precisely identify how and where democratic space is closing and who is affected. This enhanced understanding enables officials to craft more targeted interventions.

For example, analysts were quick to note Myanmar’s swift about-face toward autocracy.  This might be true, but how does this high-level generalization help craft an effective policy and foreign aid response, beyond emphasizing a need to target funds on strengthening democracy to reverse the trend? In short, it does not.  If practitioners and policymakers had dissected Myanmar’s backsliding using the six-part framework, it would have highlighted specific opportunities for intervention.  This systematic analysis reveals the regime has closed civic space, via forbidding large gatherings, as well as the information space, by outlawing online exchanges and unsanctioned news, even suspending most television broadcasts.  One could easily populate the other four spaces with recent examples, as well. 

Immediately, we see how this exercise leads to more targeted interventions—support to keep news outlets operating, for example, via software the government cannot hack—that, collectively, can help slow backsliding.  Using the framework also compels practitioners and policymakers to consider where there might be spillover—closing in one space that might bleed into another space—and what should be done to mitigate further closing.

Finally, using this framework to examine the strength of Myanmar’s democratic institutions and norms prior to the February coup d’etat may have revealed shortcomings that, if addressed, could have slowed or lessened the impact of the sudden democratic decline. For example, the high-profile arrest of journalists Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo in December 2017 was a significant signal that Myanmar’s information space was closing. Laws or actions to increase protections for journalists and media outlets, could have strengthened the media environment prior to the coup, making it more difficult for the military to close the information space.

A more precise diagnosis of the problem of democratic backsliding is the first step in crafting more effective and efficient solutions. This framework provides practitioners and policymakers a practical way to more thoroughly examine closing space situations and design holistic policies and interventions that address both the immediate challenge and longer-term issue of maintaining and growing democratic gains globally.

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International Law

Authentic Justice Thus Everlasting Peace: Because We Are One

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The ceasefire in the Israeli-Palestine conflict is a good thing. We thank God for it. Be it between two individuals or institutions or nations or the internal colonial and colonized, war does not do anything except cause more immediate or future mass misery and human destruction. Our continued memories of our interpersonal and international and internal colonial and civil wars and the memorials we erect to remember them recall and record wounds and pains we never get over. 

So it becomes a bothersome puzzle as to why we human beings still just don’t get that war like oppression leads to nowhere except to more human devastation. And we should have learned by now but have not that peacemaking like ceasefires mean nothing without justice.

 It is the reason why I constantly find myself correcting those who stress Peace and Justice.No Justice No Peace is more than a cliche.It is real politic emotionally, economically, socially, and spiritually.

Our American inner cities like those in every continent where culturally different and similar people live cramped impoverished lives and nations and colonial enclaves with such unequal wealth remind us of their continued explosive potentialities when peace is once again declared but with no justice.Everyone deserves a decent quality of life which not only includes material necessities but more importantly emotional and spiritual freedoms and other liberations.Not just the victors who conquer and rule and not just the rich and otherwise privileged.

 And until such  justices are  assured to everyone peacemaking is merely a bandaid on cancerous societal or International conflictual soars which come to only benefit those who profit from wars which are bound to come around again when there is no justice and thus peace such as  family destroying divorce lawyers, blood hungry media to sell more subscriptions , arms dealers to sell more murderous technologies, politicians needing  votes so start and prolong wars, and military men and women seeking promotion while practicing their killing capacities.

So if those of us who devoutly practice our  faiths or our golden moral principles,  let us say always and pray and advocate justice and peace always  as a vital public good  and  do justice then lasting peace in our personal lives and insist that national leaders, our own and others do the same in their conduct of international affairs and affairs with those who are stateless in this global world. 

All such pleading is essential since we are all brothers and sisters in the eyes of God who created all of us  in God’s image as one humanity  out of  everlasting divine love for all of us so we should love each other as God loves all of us  leading to desiring justice and thus lasting peace for each and every one of us.

This is difficult for those in international affairs to understand who take more conventional secular approaches to historical and contemporary justice and peace challenges as if our universal spiritual connectivennes  ( not to be confused with the vast diversity of organized religions)as human beings which makes us all brothers and sisters has no relevance. But if we are going to find true enduring peace we have no alternative but to turn our backs on increasingly useless secular methods which go either way, stressing peace then justice or justice then peace and understand how much we must begin to explore and implement approaches which we look at each other as spiritually connected brothers and sisters in which it is the expectation that peace only comes and lasts when  through the equal enjoyment of justices for every human being, we restore our universal kindred rooted in the everlasting love of God and thus for each other, no matter the different ways in which we define God or positive moral principles which originate in understandings that we human beings in all our diversities are one and thus brothers and sisters.

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