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Covid-19: How safe is “Stay Home Stay Safe”?

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Good and bad are two dimensions of everything. The race between the two is as old as human history. At times, if not always, one dimension weighs and dominates more but if it is the negative one which dominates; it becomes a matter of headache and serious concern. Covid-19 declared as pandemic by World Health Orginisation (WHO) also has two dimensions. It has taken and is continuously taking certain things from us and in turn has given us many things as well. But the former overtakes the latter and our gains from it are far less than the achievements. Apart from taking a heavy toll of human lives, it has paralyzed all the vital sectors of life, like trade and commerce, education, communication and transport. On the socio-cultural grounds it has created a serious trauma and has led to psychosomatic disturbances. The social web or fabric has seen a great set back and challenges due to the ongoing pandemic. The notions of physical distance, isolation, stay home and social distancing, are not like gospel and free from demerits. Marriage, one of the chief social institutions has faced a serious challenge in its work and function. So has the other socio-cultural and religious rituals and festivals suffered.  Many ceremonies have been delayed, postponed and even cancelled. This all has led to social stagimization as delaying or cancelling of anything auspicious in our society is taken as ill omen and this yet again has increased mental crisis, anxiety and depression.  

 Socio-psychological spheres of human life have seen great strides during the ongoing lockdown. There are very few things to be cherished from this lockdown like decrease in crimes like rape and murder, theft, environmental pollution, biodiversity loss, illegal animal pouching, unlawful encroachments and deforestation but the things to be regretted are far worse as there has been tremendous increase in domestic violence, domestic fights, psychological traumas, depression, anxiety, short temperedness and irritability. There has been a great surge in number of conflicts and brawls at local level. The social environment is in total chaos and crisis. The worst hit of these crises are none other than women. Though men too suffer to a certain extent from this lockdown but compared to women their suffering is least. The division of labour operational in our society leaves men mostly exempted from more or less all indoor and household tasks. The women apart from arranging food and managing home and hearth have to look after children and in rural areas cattle as well. All men oriented works are more or less closed due to the lockdown, so they are left with nothing except making commentary on whatsoever happens in home. The children are also facing certain challenges in staying home and are causing more trouble to their already disturbed parents. Due to non-availability of baby food and other child oriented stuff parents find it very tough to deal with the situation. The helplessness ultimately leads to frustration, which in turn gives birth to certain problems like heated argumentation, scuffle and violence.   

After Covid-19 Lockdown there has been serious increase in Domestic Violence cases all across the globe. To make people stay home, Lockdown was the lone possible option and solution to curtail and contain the spread of coronovirus. But this solution has brought more trouble in the lives of people particularly women and has increased the risk of a surge in the cases of domestic violence. Stay home doesn’t mean stay safe for all and it can’t be so. People are advised to stay at home due to Coronavirus but what if the home is also a dangerous place.  Social distancing and home isolation seem to be good and right step to save the lives of the people but on the other hand, it has made the situation worse for the women who are being abused by their partners. As the restrictions were enforced by the Government, the cases of domestic violence increased at an alarming rate in many countries. Women who are facing this act of violence have no idea how to break out and escape from this situation during the days of quarantine. France is getting notorious for the increasing rate of domestic violence cases and recently the interior minister of France, Christophe Castaner showed concern over this social evil. A helpline number was introduced to help the victims of this violence.   Similarly in China and Spain domestic violence cases have increased at an alarming rate. Spain amid strict lockdown restrictions has allowed victims of domestic abuse to leave home and report to the nearby police.

Likewise in India, the government has recently launched a toll-free helpline number for people suffering from any mental health issue due to the ongoing countrywide lockdown. On the first day, the control room received around 1,000 calls and on the second day 3,000.  Not only is the threat of a new virus scary, many people are also facing stressful life challenges. As we know a huge number of people have lost their jobs or have seen recession in their incomes. Such people are facing issues of stress, anxiety, insomnia and this all is taking a heavy toll on their mental health. The fret over future is also adding to the miseries of the people.  The bad news in the media and rumour too is adding feelings of stress and despair among people.

Lockdown as a new development was supposed to have some issues from socio-psychological point of view. In India it was not enforced properly, thoughtfully and no serious preparations were made. All of a sudden people were locked and left at the mercy of God. The subaltern section of the society faced the wrath of government and disease most.       Behavioral changes are oblivious in a lockdown like situation. Lack of coordination and understanding between people and administration and then again between the government institutions within, is a major cause of certain social and psychological troubles. Consequently people have become vulnerable to issues like fear psychosis, petulance, quarrelsomeness and even some suffer from insomnia and suicide like tendencies. People are feeling tired and agitated, and the proverb “tang amad bejang amad” is appropriate to the situation. When a person is suppressed or unable to cope up with the situation and looses all possible weapons of resistance and patience, he resorts to the weapons of the weak like belligerence and abusing. The present lockdown is turning to be a “Path laar te bethe chamb” (between Scylla and Charybdis) like situation. One cannot run away but one cannot live with the situation as well. So with only two unpleasant options one has to choose the option with lesser evil and risk. But nothing except mutual understanding, patience and cooperation can come to our rescue in this crisis situation.

Certain things can be helpful in dealing with this stressful situation. There are plenty of activities you can engage with at home, including crafts, painting, reading books, watching television, cooking and baking. As mentioned before women are more prone to anxiety and stress, hence they should be encouraged and kept in good mood. Prophet Muhammad (Pbuh) has said, “The best of you are those who are best to their women”. So it is our moral as well as religious obligation and duty to be good enough to our women, children and other fellow social beings. The pandemic will go and disappear but only our attitude and character shown in the crisis will be remembered for all the times to come.

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New Social Compact

Tenzin Choezom – On turning her struggle into her power

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Tenzin Choezom is a Tibetan refugee woman born in exile. Her life has so far oscillated between the borders of India and Nepal. She is also a graduate from Ashoka University and has a Postgraduate Diploma in Advanced Studies and Research (Adv. Major in Sociology and Anthropology). She has had a fair share of experience suffering from tinnitus for almost ten years and Meniere’s disease for the last four years. It has always been an endeavor from her end to spread awareness about the disease and create a more empathetic world for everyone.

Tell us more about the problem you are facing.

The prospect of suffering from meniere’s disease is not just physically debilitating but it rots your mental composure as well over the time. It is an everyday inner battle as an individual. But it gets isolating when that battle is not understood within the larger social setting. Unlike the people suffering from cancer which is very obvious, meniere’s disease on the other hand is a chronic invisible illness. A person with meniere’s hardly has any external visible symptoms and everything might seem normal except for the moment when the attack happens which can come at any point in time and is always uncertain. Imagine giving a presentation and you suddenly have a meniere’s attack. You are fully conscious but you have no control over yourself. You are literally spinning, losing your balance, feeling vulnerable in front of others and helpless with constant vomiting(if the dizziness gets intense) and tinnitus (ringing in the ear) which is there 24/7. Oftentimes, as a victim, instead of expecting people to understand what you are going through, you have to first deal with explaining your condition. This is a repetitive reality and it can get daunting because of the massive gap in knowledge of the disease within the community and the larger South Asian context. It is truly disheartening when people hardly acknowledge the existence of the disease as a debilitating condition of the inner ear and straight up say that it is just a mental condition when I try to bridge the gap. 

When did your issue get diagnosed?

It was during the summer of 2018. I was all ready to kickstart the summer semester at Ashoka University. But the table turned when I started having consecutive dizziness for a few seconds in the morning every time before my 8:30 class. I was fully conscious when the dizziness happened but I had no control over my balance. My friends would often laugh at me respectfully and say that I was using this as an excuse to not attend the morning class.Whatever they said did not bother me because I was naughty in that way. I was a sleepy head in the first place and would do anything to even get an extra five minutes of sleep. In between the moments of labeling it as an excuse to not attending the morning classes to potentially thinking that I was weak to knowing that my blood pressure level was low, the school infirmary nurses gave me ORS (Oral Rehydration Salts) to drink. I drank it for the first few days but no change. Finally, I decided to visit the doctor at the school infirmary who turned out to be an ENT specialist. I owe a lot to Dr. Priyanka and everyone involved at university for always giving me immense support. When I told her about the incident and my past experiences with tinnitus only after she asked, she referred me to a bigger hospital. I went through different tests (P.T.A, MRI Brain, CBC ESR, S.VirB12, T3T4TSH) and that’s how I was diagnosed with Meniere’s disease.

What is the cure?

There is no cure or scientifically proven treatment till date but there are different measures that would help control/alleviate the symptoms. There are different medications, therapies that one can look at and it can vary for different people but as for me, maintaining a salt/caffeine diet really helps. 

How are you helping other people who have the same issue?

I have always feared being vulnerable in front of others and being judged because of my illness. It has taken me a while to come to terms with it and accept it as it is. It is a part of me that will remain with me forever. But I have turned this into a purpose to make sure that no one has to suffer silently because of the gap in the knowledge. I hope that my story helps each one of you who are suffering out there to be courageous and open up a conversation with your loved ones and as envisioned,  this is a start to bringing more awareness about the disease, empathizing with the individuals, finding the treatment for it scientifically and thriving together as a community for a better tomorrow.

What has helped you to cope with the struggles you are experiencing?

When you see everyone around you enjoying to the fullest, you do not even dare to ruin the moment by having a sudden attack. I had the hardest time accepting this and hence, avoided a lot of social gatherings. But trust me, people are more generous and kinder than you think. So, try a little every day to move past your fear and do what you have always wanted to do. The attack might or might not happen. There is a 50-50 chance. Do not let the uncertainty of attack define your life. Let it come when it wants to come and you will handle it gracefully. It is definitely nerve-racking and it might take a while for you to recover from the trauma of having an attack but you will see a brighter you at the end. It has been a work in progress for me everyday to get  better with it. Seek therapy if you have the option to do it, talk to your friends and family, get your frustrations out and cry if you want to, have a balanced salt diet but most importantly, be there for yourself every step of the way. Because you can only understand the magnitude of what you have gone through.  And do not ever lose your hope even when it feels difficult. I have made this far and I believe you can too. Besides that, reading really helped and has been so therapeutic for me. I would suggest you read ‘In Love with the World: A Monk’s Journey Through the Bardos of Living and Dying’ by Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche la. It has been a savior for me for the longest time and I still go back to it when I feel anxious.

Anything else you want to share?

To those who are suffering out there like me, I see you and can empathize with you fully. I know that it sucks to the core to always be positive when the disease drains your mental and physical energy but life goes on. Living with the fear of attack is the worst thing you are doing to yourself. I know this fact but it is still taking me a while to get over it. But  I hope we can outgrow the fear of attack one day and truly live everyday to the best of our ability. I am always here if you need someone to talk to and let’s together create a better world  to live for everyone. You can always write to me at tenzin.choezom[at]alumni.ashoka.edu.in Also, thank you to Vidhi for amplifying my story of struggle with Meniere’s and giving a hope to thrive for everyone.

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New Social Compact

COVID- a way forward with Sustainability & Biodiversity

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Since the onset of the COVID- 19 pandemic, a new unprecedented situation has arisen many new challenges including social, health, sustainability and world economic issues. COVID -19 is a severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus II, first identified in Wuhan city of China on December 19, 2021 and until now this virus has reached its sparks to 218 countries and killed 3.9 million people across the world.  It magnifies the everlasting impacts of inequality, batting the poor the hardest. Periods of fortified unemployment, global shortage critical medical and personal protective equipment including masks, protection sheets, gloves and medicines further afloat economies resilience by foster sustainable economic systems- low- carbon investment and green infrastructure planning.  The G7 and G 20 ensure to finance least developed and developing countries in flattening the pandemic curve along with the extreme focus on sustainable resource development, climate change mitigation measures and fair economies.

Up till now 25% of plant and animal species are on the verge of extinction, therefore, countries should consider biodiversity in their COVID19 response and economic recovery plans because land use changes and wildlife exploitation increase the risk of many diseases by bringing humans and domestic animals closer to pathogens and disrupting disease-sustaining ecological processes.

The economy and human well-being depend on food, clean water, flood protection, erosion control, the drive for innovation, and more. More than half of the world’s national production relies heavily on moderate biodiversity. Thus, decline in biodiversity poses a major threat to society. As part of the policy to respond to COVID19, investing in biodiversity can help mitigate these risks while creating jobs and economic incentives.

Although government and business leaders have recognized the importance of green recovery, and their focus is now on climate change. As part of the restoration and environmental protection system, they should talk to each other. Many countries have taken comprehensive measures to protect biodiversity in response to their COVID19 policies. Examples of biodiversity measures include changes to regulations on the wildlife trade to protect human health, and employment programs focused on ecosystem restoration, sustainable forest management, and control of invasive species.

Analysts suggest that the amount of potentially harmful costs incurred as part of the economic recovery from the COVID-19 crisis far outweighs the benefits to biodiversity. Governments should take the necessary steps to integrate biodiversity policies into COVID-19 recovery projects, ensure that COVID-19 economic recovery measures support biodiversity without jeopardizing it, maintain regulation, and reduce land use. , wildlife, wildlife trade and pollution and attach the environmental condition to the bailout to improve stability, screen and monitor stimulus measures of their biodiversity effects due to plastic pollution and now due to mask pollution in seas or Covid- 19 poor disposal of protection equipment. In order to combat such drastic conditions, large investments should be made in the conservation, sustainable use and restoration of biodiversity.

There is no socio-economic development in the current global panorama. These problems and challenges directly affect human psychology, leading to the loss of psychological stability and the escalation of the financial crisis. Especially, because people are threatened by so many threats, there are more and more cases of mental crisis because people are locked at home and told to be As a result of people being told to confine themselves to their homes and maintain self-loneliness, someone is more likely to be severely affected psychologically, further affected by a lack of proper guidance or treatment.

When no resources are provided to manage the well-being of the people, the situation becomes profitable and affects mental health. Regarding the effects on sustainable psychology, the importance of better mental health should be discussed as it affects individual development and counters limit personal activities.

We have had many epidemics in the past. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS outbreak) has hit Asian countries, and West Africa has also been infected with the Ebola virus. They also affected the socio-economic balance, affected public health, and caused numerous similar deaths to what we are experiencing with COVID-19 but the new thing now is that Coronavirus affected us mentally, physically and well-being of the ecosystem with its drawbacks of limiting resources by humans while staying at homes due to partial or national lockdown where they put a burden on economy and ecosystem by overconsumption of natural resources instead at the same time human enclosure at homes give a chance to ecosystem for its resource restoration, replenishing disastrous effects caused by anthropogenic activities like decline in air pollution, soil erosion, mineral leaching, hunting, poaching and wildlife trade. 

Humans are deteriorating the habitat of wild animals and the normal cycle of pathogens and their hosts. In such situations, we are becoming more and more prone to new diseases. Human pathogens such as the coronavirus are not fully understood to date and several other strains or wildlife as host of this virus (and many other viruses and bacteria) in nature that could be a matter of global health in the future. The COVID-19 pandemic is calling into question our ongoing efforts to improve the Earth’s environment. Achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) is even more important now. Emphasis should be placed on the adoption of strict wildlife trade regulations and comprehensive measures to protect the natural environment. Most importantly, consider comprehensive ways to improve our relationship with the environment that will lead us to sustainability. Agricultural stability and reduction of dependence on animal products is one such example.

There is no doubt in saying that there are some important lessons to learn from COVID-19. It is about our survival, preparedness and responsibility against nature that will lead to the control of future epidemics. Shutdowns are proving to be viable not only in breaking the chain of infection but also in the healing of the ecosystem. Air and water pollution levels have dropped in many parts of the world and nature has begun to regenerate. The important thing is that what we as human beings learn from it. Will we reduce greenhouse gas emissions evenly, will unnecessary travel be curtailed, will we allow the reduction of pollutants in the ecosystem to let nature breathe, and will we promote and adopt sustainable agricultural practices? And stop disturbing wild habitats? Most importantly, will all stakeholders, including governments, organizations and individuals, unite to fight the epidemic that has been going on for decades and resulting in loss of life and biodiversity? There will be a decrease sooner or later, the deadly coronavirus, and one of the most explosive epidemics of the century will be tackled through vaccines or other means through united efforts across borders of countries and continents. But this is not the first novel pathogen that has targeted us, nor the last. There is a need for a fresh perspective to address some of the key issues we have learned from this pandemic.  Therefore, humanity must work together to stop the root causes of these pandemics. The way to deal with such pandemics in advance is to make every effort to achieve the goals of environmental sustainability.

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Anagha Rajesh – Founder of Yours Mindfully

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Undergrad researcher, storyteller, and community builder- that’s Anagha Rajesh, in a nutshell. 

She is the Founder and CEO of Yours Mindfully, a youth-led organization on a mission to make mental health resources accessible to 1 million young people by 2030. 

She has worked as an advocate for the Girls in Science 4 SDGs platform that works closely with the United Nations to make STEM accessible. In addition, Anagha has served as a facilitator for the Digital Exchange program empowering middle and high school students to collaborate beyond borders to achieve the UN SDGs. 

As a researcher, she is working on a project to identify biomarkers for endometriosis, a painful uterine condition. 

Tell us more about your initiative, Yours Mindfully? 

Growing up, I saw my uncle suffer from schizophrenia and how the stigma around this condition prevented him from seeking medical support. When I was accepted into the 1000 Girls 1000 Futures mentorship program of the New York Academy of Science in 2019, I shared my uncle’s story with other young people in the program. We realized that mental health is a stigma in most parts of the world and decided to do something to smash that stigma. 

We then went on to create e-magazines to create awareness about mental health. That’s how Yours Mindfully was born. We were called MindChamps back then. The popularity of our e-magazines encouraged me to grow our team and focus on areas beyond the e-magazine. 

Yours Mindfully is now a team of 30+ young people worldwide, focusing on addressing awareness, inclusion, and accessibility in the mental health space. We create inclusive content, organize webinars, spearhead social media campaigns, and conduct contests to bring more stakeholders. 

We have partnered with a range of organizations, including UNICEF, 6 Seconds (UK), Spill the Beans (Australia), Spikeview (USA), Manzil Center (UAE), and Road to Nepenthe (India). In addition, we work closely with mental health professionals to create our resources and partner with educators to get this across to young people. 

Over the last three years, our initiatives have impacted 5000+ young people. We are currently piloting a program offering personalized mental health resources to youth organizations and schools. 

What is the Ashoka Changemakers program all about? 

Ashoka is the world’s largest network of Social Entrepreneurs and Changemakers. Error! Hyperlink reference not valid. is a carefully selected network of young people who have found their power to create change for the good of all and are ready to take on their next big role as co-leaders of the global Everyone a Changemaker movement. 

13 young changemakers were selected for the Indian cohort out of 18,000+ applicants globally. Selected changemakers get access to mentorship, digital resources and a volunteer marketplace to further the impact of their initiatives. In addition, young changemakers get involved in getting more young people to become changemakers through focused initiatives. 

How did you get selected for this? 

The selection process was a 6-8 month long process with the following stages

1. Submission of the nomination form – This involves a detailed description of my changemaking idea – I spoke about Yours Mindfully, the impact I have created so far through the organization and how I plan to co-lead the changemaker movement.

2. National Review – 4 to 5 hours of conversations with Ashoka India Team

3. International Review – 2 to 3 hours of conversations with Senior Leaders and existing Ashoka Young Changemakers from the global network

4. Selection Panel – an in-person pitch to an esteemed jury explaining what the future potential of my changemaking idea is and how invested I am in implementing it

What are you planning to do in the next 5 years? 

I plan to grow Yours Mindfully to impact more young people worldwide. I am currently exploring research in biochemistry, entrepreneurship and public policy. I hope to pursue a career at the intersection of these fields in the next 5 years. In addition, I want to explore writing and traveling in a way that helps me grow. 

What other programs and fellowships are on your list that you’d like to engage in? 

Dalai Lama Fellowship, Clinton Global Fellowship and Rhodes Scholarship (super ambitious!) are some programs that I am hoping to get into

Tell us more about your work at Force of Nature. 

Force of Nature is a non-profit working to mobilize young people’s potential to combat the climate crisis.

 I completed a three-week introductory program on becoming a force of nature, where I learned about eco-anxiety, the power of narratives in addressing the environmental crisis, and how I can utilize my unique skills to contribute to the climate movement.
Following this generic training, I joined the Canopy pathway to train as a youth consultant to help businesses create and implement solid sustainability strategies
– Under the guidance of experienced youth consultants Clover Hogan and Sacha Wright, I am working on understanding concepts like greenwashing, identifying greenwashing in the sustainability strategies of Fortune 500 companies, and figuring out ways to engage meaningfully with corporate leaders on these issues. I have been on-boarded as a consultant and am looking forward to my first project in the upcoming months. 

Anything else you’d like to share about yourself?

I am the first woman from my family and community to get into a top-tier university in India and to kick-start a non-profit. I am super passionate about helping girls and women access networks and mentorship to get ahead on their journeys. 

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