The odyssey of the American Civil War

The importance of a strong central government

Peace, community, nation-building beginning at a grassroots level (freeing the enslaved) are all necessary for a strong government. Problems in any nation must be dealt with collectively when it comes to agenda, majority rule and policy. At the end of the day to achieve a strong central government for the people, by the people, of the people agenda, majority rule and policy must achieve unity and influence not only amongst the cabinet of the day but also the leaders of the model governing body to be a strong government with effective and consistent leadership at the helm. A powerful central government deals with issues regarding its legal network and ramifications thereof, the environment, the military, the defense, foreign and national policy, public health and administration, labor, social welfare and education.

A central government was necessary for the development of the nation It must strengthen issues and ties of national importance amongst its nation’s inhabitants. What happened in a postwar-America was to deal with problems of nation-building, the confidence of her inhabitants, strife in nation-building, conflict and secession. There were men who saw the potential for change. Men and women who saw that a nation had to be built.

A strong central body was needed because of the estimates and implications of the economic costs of the burnout of the war. There was a rampant demise in health and disease, and the effects and fallout of the war had affected not just slaves but also American families, soldiers and their wives.

Economic influence, the personal status of every individual inhabitant, the self-assurance of America’s leaders was conditioned postwar. The end of the war promised an end to the disharmony, the disorder, the unrest, the morale of a nation confounded by the turbulence of war and it also marked a return to a tempered social unity, an empirical solidarity amongst the people after the tragic set of circumstance of the war.

The reasons and outcomes of the American Civil War

Of course, the main reason for the war was the issue of slavery, the abolitionists, the land question, Abraham Lincoln being elected as president and the stance that he took on slaves and the ownership of slaves. Amongst the downtrodden souls of the people of the postwar American nation this war warranted tragedy. It initiated a fleeting compromise amongst North and South where at first none could be seen, an examination between the North and the South’s struggles for the “concentration of wealth” (the acquisition of slaves) to survive somehow. In other words, to own slaves was tantamount to gold to the south, but for a fledgling and progressive republican democracy it had to come to an end.

In conclusion, it is easy to surmise that after the devastation and the backlash of war a season of hope and prosperity would follow for both North and South. The South felt usurped and many battled illness and health issues on both sides. In the face of tragedy and an uncertain future a central government emerged trumping the race question and the concentration of wealth in the hands of an elect few. This government offered an end to an undeniably intellectual battle within the class system (the place of class in an apartheid system).

After the war there was a capacity for dual economic and political change at great economic cost. Thousands of men had lost their lives for this social reform, freedom and the prohibition of slavery. We can sense that one of the outcomes of this egregious nation-building of this brave new world was paved in blood, dissolution, an unsystematic reasoning of slave ownership and “semantic” choice.

Abigail George
Abigail George
Abigail George is a researcher and historian. Follow her on Facebook, Linkedin and Instagram @abigailgeorgepoet.