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Entrepreneurial Platform Economies

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Mobilization of futurism creates wider global-age skills-gaps; today, openly visible are varying levels of tactical smartness about understanding global-age battlefields amongst political leaderships and their economic performances. There are three types of common elections promises creating three types of daily realties; firstly, revival of stack-chimneys and hard labor work may sound nostalgic on a podium but in realties nothing but economic death traps while lack of new global-age smart skills being ignored, secondly, declaring trade-war to cover-up internal limitations of skills on exports in realties do not bring back jobs rather slows economies and thirdly, creating fake bubbles and crises politics or shepherding invisible unicorns as miracles of innovation are all in realities hurting local grassroots prosperity. What’s clearly on rise is the restless citizenry and populism. Why is all this happening, why lack of serious debates; why such chaos?

Some pragmatic solutions: The unstoppable force of Platform Economies; when smart digital platforms operate like complex AI centric automatic transactions processing plants replacing lingering bureaucracies where old manually structured organizations are morphed instantly into digitized assembling and disassembling achieving desired architectural shapes processing unlimited tasks at miniscule costs, unlimited bounce and with full scalability, all in real time.

Yes, you have watched this in Sci-Fi movies.
Yes, this is 2020 reality.
Yes, this is just a start.

Study the robotization of society and elimination of bureaucracies; transforming sluggishly established business models into new butterflies to finally alter local economies. Same platforms can bring amazing results in public sectors buried under paper. To play is this arena deeper strengths of self-discovery and self-optimization are critical.

Business-Reality Blending into Entrepreneurial-Virtuality Diffusing into Technology 

This is a new split-second-transactional-world of business, entrepreneurial platforms save the day, growth comes with solid understanding of 100% accuracy and quality, productivity lands with delivery of promise with 100% fluidity and profitability rains with national-global-alliances and this is how grassroots prosperity blossoms, this is how restless citizenry saved form populism. How do you educate public – private sectors on such pragmatic solutions?  How do create new thinking?

Why is this now a crucial necessity; if declarations of external trade-wars only prove presence of unskilled-citizenry unable to stand up to global exportability, it’s now time for declarations of internal skill-wars to train highly skilled-citizenry to outperform on global trading via collaborative synthesizim. This is how, national mobilization of entrepreneurialism and deployment of platform economies come into play.

Economic Forecasts:  2020 -2040 -2050

Briefly glance at 1990, 2000, 2010, study the behavioral shifts in consumerism and services, global shifts demanding instant gratifications and competitive forces of superior quality and human performance. The forecasts of future are very easy; just multiply such factors with 100% to 1000% …expect ferocious demands for tactical-creative-skills. Global out-cry for honest control on data-management real hunger for collaborative alliances.  Future is about skills and sleepy nations ignoring such challenges will awaken to harsh realities. As an example, where we are today, compared to the skills needed to fall off cliffs with planks bounded on our arms during the Wright Bros era to our modern day landing of Airbus 380-A at busiest airports. We need massive transformation to cope future.

Justify corporate existence with lifelong learning and not just profits

National Mobilization of Entrepreneurialism uplifts thousands of mid-size businesses to enable creation of digital platforms to generate exportability and profitability to create local grassroots prosperity; this is how new models of economic uplifts are made. Without debate, discussions, just silence becomes a proof of incompetency. Now new thought leadership needed to create highly skilled-citizenry.
Nation’s biggest assets will not be how many machines but how skilled their citizenry.

The transformation to platform economy made possible by three key factors:
Witnessing the recent huge virtual empires without visible structures,
Recognizing block-chain advances creating layers of efficiencies with deliverable reach,
Understanding free-technologies drowning once mighty organizations and institutions,
Transformation is the only way for lifelong learning as a global-age economic survival methodology

Beyond 2020, any large major trade group or organization unless preparing for powerful digital platforms may not be able to survive with just old websites, shopping carts and basic portals.

Some 25 years ago; majority occupants of corner offices of tallest skyscrapers of the world had almost no ideas what email, URL or websites were and thus a massive transformation took place. We are at that very point, all over again.

Management must demonstrate understanding to compress large complex organizational structures with diverse and distributed activity and shrink them into virtual power-balls on a platform to bounce creating extreme performance with national or global scalability in real time. Nations and regions that missed the varying levels industrial revolutions could simply advance now to the Platform Economy. Once you decide that your business model is already qualified for creating a sophisticated digital platform around it, suddenly, the organization faced with three challenges.  

Most transformations are not new funding dependent but mostly mobilization starved.

To study your own current organization you will be required to dismantle ambiguity by creating high rational for each and every single move, every angle at every junction. Not that easy, but such planning sometimes is already there and perfected over a course of time or in need of fine tuning to fit on brand new schematics. In either case specialized high value guided tours can help with such pains.

Solid business models land solidly on digital platforms and immediately start working wonders.

There are two simple options, firstly, create a dedicated person on Platform Economy and have this person trained enough to be able to articulate the exiting business model to over lay over digital platforms with recommendations and secondly attend some world-class global events and special workshop and round-table discussions on these topics.

Caution; avoid tackling this as IT issue, as it is not. This is an entrepreneurial issue, solid business modeling, wrapped in collaborative synthesizim, landing on right technologies, like how to create bounce with relevant alliances to boost your business, plus Micro-Power-Nation, like many dozens of small nations and their massive markets that would open up new venues, plus understanding futurism. Once all this sorted out in national mobilization and deployment of the platform modeling, IT teams will come in to do their relevant parts. Window installers, brick-layers and elevator engineers build skyscrapers but they do not design skyscrapers, architects do.

Mastery of your vertical market, supremacy of your image and innovative performance are the real issues, as rest becomes deployment of virtual bricks and mobilization of mortar.

Champions of Platform Economy wanted for global projects…

Study in depth on Google, find and evaluate your hidden talents and rare untapped special skills, entrepreneurialism is a savior, degrees have become irrelevant, if any such bold ideas fit, become a champion. Study even harder… this November 4th to 7th at  WEB Summit Lisbon, Platformara from Ireland, a Division of Expothon is building and growing global teams. New energies and global ideas unleashed for game changers.

Chambers of Commerce and Trade Associations of the world are primed to enjoy the ride and dramatically boost their local economies. With 10,000 Chambers and some 100,000 trade Associations
a massive transformation is at play as special skills and industry specific-dialogues are the critically missing links. Expect some powerful platforms in these sectors soon.

Quadrability Thinking: is a four-dimensional executions and simultaneous working style that fits smart environments laced with Artificial Intelligence, block-chains intertwined with global complexities of commerce and new global-age-style performance. Platform Economy demands such warriors.

Observe the speed, how fast 2020 will unfold and set pathways towards 2030.

Naseem Javed is a corporate philosopher, Chairman of Expothon Worldwide; a Canadian Think tank focused on National Mobilization of Entrepreneurialism Protocols on Platform Economy and exportability solutions now gaining global attention. His latest book; Alpha Dreamers; the five billions connected who will change the world.

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Economy

COVID-19: New Dynamics to the World’s Politico-Economic Structure

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How ironic it is that a virus invisible from a naked human eye can manage to topple down the world and its dynamics. Breaking out of CoronaVirus, its spread across the globe and the diversity of consequences faced by the individual states all make it evident how the dynamics of the world could be reversed in months. Starting from the blame games regarding coronavirus to its geostrategic implications and the entire enigma between COVID-19 and politics, COVID-19 and economies have shaken the world. Whether it is the acclaimed super power, struggling powers or third world states or even individuals, the pandemic has unveiled the capability and credibility of all, especially in political and economic domains. Wearing masks in public, avoiding hand shake and maintaining distance from one another have emerged as ‘new normal’ in the social world of interaction.

Since the pandemic has locked its eyes upon the globe, world politics has taken an unfortunate drift. From the opportunities for leaders to abuse power during state of emergency (which is imposed in different states to limit the spread of novel Coronavirus) to the likelihood of rise of far-right nationalists to the emergence of ‘travel bubbles’ between states (such as New Zealand and Australia) and the increased chances of regionalism in post-pandemic world to the new terrorist strategies to gain support and many others, all are result of the pandemic’s impact on the political world, one way or the other. Since the end of WWII, the United States has taken the role of global leadership and after the Cold War, it became more prominent as it was the sole superpower of the world. Talking ideally, pandemics are perceived to bring up global cooperation but in the COVID-19 scenario it has started a whole new set of debates, sparkled nativism versus globalization and the sharp divide in global politics has drifted the focus from overcoming the global pandemic through global response to inward looking policies of leaders.

Covid-19 has impacted every sphere of life, be it social, political, health or economic. The pandemic itself being the result of a globalized world has affected globalization badly. It is the best illustration of the interrelation of politics and economics and how the steps in one sector impact the other in this interdependent, globalized world. Political actions such as restricting travel had drastic economic impacts especially to the countries whose economy is largely dependent on tourism, foreign investment etc. Similarly, economic actions such as limiting foreign products’ access had political implications in the form of sudden unemployment and downturn in living standards of people.

For the first time in history, oil prices became negative when its demand suddenly dropped when industries were shut down almost everywhere. Russia and Saudi Arabia’s oil clash which led to increased oil production by Saudi Arabia further complicated the situation. This unprecedented drop in oil demand and consequently its price would only help in the economic recovery of countries. Covid-19 has impacted three sectors badly. First of all, it affected production as global manufacturing has declined due to decrease in demand. Secondly, it has created supply chain and market disruption. Finally, lockdowns affected local businesses everywhere. Bad impact aside, pandemic has led to the change in demand of products. Instead of investment and foreign trade, states having strong medical and textiles industries have got the opportunity of increasing exports. This is because there are requirements of face masks everywhere to avoid contagion. Need for medical instruments have also increased such as ventilators in developing countries specially. 

The only positive impact of Coronavirus is that it fostered environmental cleanliness. It is said that it can avert a climate emergency but the fact is that, as soon as the lockdown will be eased and businesses will begin returning into functioning, economic growth and prosperity will be prioritized over sustainability and we might even witness, more than ever, carbon emissions into the atmosphere.

Novel coronavirus has brought new dynamics to the world’s politico-economic structure. While the world has the opportunity to come close for cooperation and consensus to fight it, we might witness increased regionalism in the post-pandemic world as a cautious measure and alternative where crisis management would be more cooperative and quick. There is a likelihood of the emergence of an international treaty or regime to ban bio-weapons. While the prevalence of political optimism is not assured in the post-pandemic world, we are likely to see the interdependent economic world, as before, to overcome the economic slump and revive the global economy. 

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The free trade vision and its fallacies: The case of the African Continental Free Trade Area

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The notion of free trade consists of the idea of a trade policy where no restrictions will be implemented on imports or exports in the respected countries that have signed such an agreement. Some economists argue that free trade is understood through the idea of the free market being forced through international trade. The African Continental Free Trade Area (AfCFTA) is a trade area that was founded in 2018, and it is the most ambiguous project in the history of the continent. This project has plenty of potential successes, as well as fallacies. Particular African nations are either in favor or against this project, and it is a matter of time before the world understands if this project will reflect the true notion behind the idea of a free trade policy.

The African Continental Free Trade Area: The European Union Vision in Africa?

The African Continental Free Trade Area was founded in 2018 in Kigali, Rwanda. It is believed to be the most prestigious project ever created on the continent. It was created by the African Continental Free Trade Agreement and it was signed by 44 countries. Some of the general objectives of this agreement include: The creation of a single economic market, the establishment of a liberalized market, the allowance of free movement of capital and people, diversification of the industrial development in the continent, e.t.c. In some ways, this project can be compared with the European Union and the vision that it represents for a single market and free movement of goods and people. However, due to the size and the geopolitical tensions of the African continent, there are a few obstacles to the achievement of this project. The European Union itself was a project that took more than half a century to be established in its current form, and still, we can see some problems that remain. With that being said, among the 27 member states, there seems to be more or less a coherent economic and political stability. In the case of the African Union, there are far more obstacles, ranging from huge economic differences, political and religious turmoils, and in general a neglected infrastructure; that might not be able to support a mammoth project like this. Any sort of optimism should be also approached with a realistic perspective when it comes to its implementation, which might not be happening anytime soon, certainly not before 2030.

The Relevance of the Free Trade Notion in Africa

It is important to remember that this project deals with the concept of free trade, and free trade itself is something that economists still argue about. Generally speaking, most economists seem to be in favor of free trade. There is an argument that supports the idea of free trade and any kind of reduction in government-induced restrictions on free trade which will be beneficial to economic growth and stability. On the other hand, some economists suggest that the policy of protectionism could be a more lucrative alternative for an economic policy. There is a suggestion that the liberalization of trade will result in an unequal distribution of losses and profit gains while economically dislocating a large number of workers in import-competing sectors.

In the case of the AfCFTA however, the opinion of Ha-Joon Chang, a South Korean economist, might be more relevant. He suggested that if there is going to be any kind of free trade liberalization in the African continent, some prior steps should be taken. For example, the improvement of the institutions in those developing African nations must be achieved to have sustainable economic growth and development. In addition, the idea of demanding from the developing nations to achieve institutional standards that we see in the developed nations such as the U.S or Great Britain, but have never before been achieved in those countries, will only hurt these nations since they might not need or even afford the implementation of these institutions that we see in the West. There is a valid point in the argument because the concept of the AfCFTA might indeed benefit some nations in Africa, but still, it will not develop to its full potential to benefit all 44 countries that have signed the agreement. This is because this project involves countries with different views and needs. Some of them see the AfCFTA as a blessing for the liberalization of the African economy, while other nations are more skeptical about it, thinking that this project will result in African states “biting off, more than they can chew”. This dichotomy is visually striking when we compare some African nations and examine the true reasons why they are in favor or against the AfCFTA.

The African Dichotomy

Rwanda is a small nation in East Africa, having at least 12.5 million people, with a total estimate of its GDP being close to $33.45 billion. A very impressive number, if someone considers the fact that in 1980 its GDP was barely $2.1 billion. It is also the nation that is strongly in favor of the ambitious free trade project in the continent. It is estimated that from 1994 until 2010, Rwanda’s economy grew an average of 6.6%. This is mostly based on the fact that the president of the country, Paul Kagame, led a strong campaign towards the liberalization of the country’s agricultural sector. His reforms allowed the producers to benefit from this liberalization boom while boosting productivity through capital investments. It is clear by now that any sort of project that aims to liberalize the economies of other African nations will be beneficial to Rwanda that aims, as President Paul Kagame mentioned before, to make Rwanda the “Singapore of Africa”.

However, some countries pose some key arguments that need to be addressed for the AfCFTA. There are concerns regarding the massive difference between populations in many African states, as well as the potential of the markets to sustain such a project. With that being said, there is still optimism from some experts that view this project as a win-win situation for Africa since it will allow a trade-led diversification away from Africa’s commodity dependence and focus towards industrial development. On the other hand, this optimism is being taken with a “pinch of salt” from certain African nations, like Nigeria. Nigeria is a nation of at least 205 million people with a total GDP of $1.087 trillion. Nigeria was one of the last nations to sign the agreement, but not before firmly opposing the deal. The strongest argument that Nigeria had against the deal, was the fact that Nigeria could do nothing to undermine the local Nigerian manufactures and entrepreneurs of the country. There was strong domestic opposition to regional trade liberalization and concerns about the government’s ability to implement it effectively. In the same line of thought, Togo’s Foreign Minister Robert Dussey did not hide his concerns. In an interview with Deutsche Welle, Mr. Dussey stressed the fact that many African countries will need to be firstly well-equipped with the right technical tools to meet the challenges of such an enormous project. He shared his views that some rich nations in the West are not so keen to see the potential industrialization of the African continent: “African development is foremost the responsibility of Africans. We have a problem with work for our youth. It is important that we have strong industries to have work for the young”, said Mr. Dussey for Deutsche Welle.

Can we safely say that the AfCFTA project complies with the economic policy of free trade? Theoretically, it does. The project has the potential to change the socio-economic status of all the countries involved. Even if some nations are more industrialized than others, and can take full advantage of the opportunities for manufactured goods, other nations that might not be so privileged can benefit by linking their economies into regional value chains. This can happen again theoretically if there is a reduction in trade costs and facilitating investments. However, one should not overlook the growing challenges of this project. It is not feasible to suggest a 90% tariff cut, a unified digital payments system, and an African trade observatory dashboard that the AU Commission promises in the next five years. For the simple reason that you cannot have this liberalized economic system when most of the African countries are suffering from socio-political instability. How can a system which in some ways is based on the European Union, work when there is such a striking inequality among African nations? There is a lack of industrial infrastructure to support such a project, and it will be more beneficial to address these regional problems before expanding in a global vision. One day Africa will reach its full potential, but not in the next five years and not in the next ten years. Such an agreement is a blessing, but it needs careful examination before being implemented; otherwise, we will talk about a disaster in the African continent that could potentially bring more inequality and regional tensions.

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Turning to sustainable global business: 5 things to know about the circular economy

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Due to the ever-increasing demands of the global economy, the resources of the planet are being used up at an alarming rate and waste and pollution are growing fast. The idea of a more sustainable “circular economy” is gaining traction, but what does this concept mean, and can it help save the planet?

1) Business as usual, the path to catastrophe

Unless we make some major adjustments to the way the planet is run, many observers believe that business as usual puts us on a path to catastrophe.

Around 90 per cent of global biodiversity loss and water stress (when the demand for water is greater than the available amount), and a significant proportion of the harmful emissions that are driving climate change, is caused by the way we use and process natural resources.

Over the past three decades, the amount of raw materials extracted from the earth, worldwide, has more than doubled. At the current rate of extraction, we’re on course to double the amount again, by 2060.

According to the International Resource Panel, a group of independent expert scientists brought together by the UN to examine the issue, this puts us in line for a three to six degree temperature increase, which would be deadly for much life on Earth. 

2) A circular economy means a fundamental change of direction

Whilst there is no universally agreed definition of a circular economy, the 2019 United Nations Environment Assembly, the UN’s flagship environment conference, described it as a model in which products and materials are “designed in such a way that they can be reused, remanufactured, recycled or recovered and thus maintained in the economy for as long as possible”.

In this scenario, fewer resources would be needed, less waste would be produced and, perhaps most importantly, the greenhouse gas emissions which are driving the climate crisis, would be prevented or reduced.

This goes much further than simply recycling: for the circular economy to happen,  the dominant economic model of “planned obsolescence” (buying, discarding and replacing products on a frequent basis) would have to be upended, businesses and consumers would need to value raw materials, from glass to metal to plastics and fibres, as resources to be valued, and products as things to be maintained and repaired, before they are replaced.

3) Turn trash into cash

Increasingly, in both the developed and the developing world, consumers are embracing the ideas behind the circular economy, and companies are realising that they can make money from it. “Making our economies circular offers a lifeline to decarbonise our economies”, says Olga Algayerova, the head of the UN Economic Commission for Europe, (UNECE), “and could lead to the creation of 1.8 million net jobs by 2040”.

In the US, for example, a demand for affordable, high-quality furniture, in a country where some 15 million tonnes of discarded furniture ends up in landfill every year, was the spur for the creation of Kaiyo, an online marketplace that makes it easier for furniture to be repaired and reused. The company is growing fast, and is part of a trend in the country towards a more effective use of resources, such as the car-sharing app Zipcar, and Rent the Runway, a rental service for designer clothing.

In Africa, there are many projects, large and small, which incorporate the principles of the circular economy by using existing resources in the most efficient way possible. One standout initiative is Gjenge Makers in Kenya. The company sells bricks for the construction industry, made entirely from waste. The young founder, Nzambi Matee, who has been awarded a UN Champion of the Earth award, says that she is literally turning trash into cash. The biggest problem she faces is how to keep up with demand: every day Gjenge Makers recycles some 500 kilos of waste, and can produces up to 1,500 plastic bricks every day.

4) Governments are beginning to step up

But, for the transition to take hold, governments need to be involved. Recently, major commitments have been made in some of the countries and regions responsible for significant resources use and waste. 
The US Government’s American Jobs Plan, for example, includes measures to retrofit energy-efficient homes, electrify the federal fleet of vehicles, including postal vans, and ending carbon pollution from power generation by 2035.

In the European Union, the EU’s new circular economy action plan, adopted in 2020, is one of the building blocks of the ambitious European Green Deal, which aims at making Europe the first climate-neutral continent.

And, in Africa, Rwanda, Nigeria and South Africa founded the African Circular Economy Alliance, which calls for the widespread adoption of the circular economy on the continent. The Alliance supports African leaders who champion the idea, and creates coalitions to implement pilot projects.

5) Squaring the circle?

However, there is still a long way to and there is even evidence that the world is going backwards: the 2021 Circularity Gap Report, produced annually by the Circle Economy thinktank, estimates that the global circularity rate (the proportion of recovered materials, as a percentage of overall materials used) stands at only 8.6 per cent, down from 9.1 per cent in 2018

So how can the world be made “rounder”? There are no easy answers, and no silver bullet, but Ms. Algayerova points to strong regulation as a big piece of the puzzle.

“I am proud that for the automotive sector, a UN regulation adopted at UNECE in 2013 requires 85 per cent of new vehicles’ mass to be reusable or recyclable. This binding regulation influences the design of around one quarter of all vehicles sold globally, some 23 million in 2019.”

“It’s a step in the right direction, but these kind of approaches need to be massively scaled up across all sectors”, she adds. “Shifting to the circular economy is good for business, citizens and nature, and must be at the heart of a sustainable recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic.”

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