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Building the Next Phase of Growth in Southeast Asia Around Renewable Energy

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It is one of the fastest growing and dynamic regions in the world. A global trade hub and a strong example of the benefits of regional cooperation, Southeast Asia promises to emerge as one the most successful economic development stories of the 21st century. To fulfill its full potential however, the region should turn decisively to renewables to meet rising energy demand.

IRENA Director-General Francesco La Camera will reinforce the importance of a low-carbon energy path in Southeast Asia at the Singapore International Energy Week 2019 (SIEW) this week. With energy consumption expected to double by 2040 meeting rising demands with secure, affordable and clean supply may be one of the most important priorities the countries of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), face today.

In a keynote address at SIEW IRENA Director-General Francesco La Camera will outline a pathway to prosperity bolstered by low-carbon technologies. With the event taking place under the theme of “Accelerating Energy Transformation” the Director General’s opening keynote highlighted that renewables are the only way to meet rising demand whilst reducing emissions, noting that the transformation can be done cost-effectively and with significant benefits to ASEAN.

The Director-General will point to recent auctions in the region that have seen bids below the cost of generating power from gas and that would, until just a few days ago, have made global records. Noting global trends that have seen renewables move from what was once a luxury just a decade ago, to now being seen as the lowest-cost source of new power generation in a growing number of contexts. IRENA believes renewables will compete with any fossil fuel in Southeast Asia by 2025.

In an op-ed published ahead of SIEW Mr. La Camera addressed the notion of cheap coal. He said that powering growth with fossil fuels – particularly coal – is unlikely to be the least cost option if externalities such as health and the consequences of climate change are factored in to economic projections. This is against a backdrop of the Asian Development Bank’s forecast that Southeast Asia’s GDP could shrink by 11 per cent by the end of the century due to climate change. In this context, the Director-General points out, coal is almost certainly not the least expensive power generation option.

Beyond the Director-General’s keynote speeches a new IRENA report on the decarbonisation of shipping will be presented at the Global Maritime Forum. The report, entitled: “Navigating the way to a renewable future: Solutions to decarbonise shipping, explores the impact of maritime shipping on CO2 emissions, characterises the shipping sector and identifies various clean energy solutions with the potential to reduce the sector’s carbon footprint. International shipping represents around 9 per cent of the global emissions associated with the transport sector, thus making the reduction of maritime emissions key to achieving climate goals.

To the ministers, business leaders and leading industry officials of Southeast Asia, the Agency’s message is that it’s possible to accelerate the speed of transformation and to meet climate and sustainable development goals, with renewables. Long-term policy decisions and a significant increase in investment flows should align with the region’s stated goal to scale up the share of renewables in primary energy to 23 per cent of by 2025. In its going commitment to ASEAN energy transformation, IRENA stands ready to support.

IRENA

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Austria’s efforts to accelerate its clean energy transition

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Austria is committed to reaching carbon neutrality by 2040 at the latest – 10 years earlier than the goal set by the European Union. To meet this ambitious deadline, the Austrian government will need to significantly step up decarbonisation efforts across all parts of its energy sector, the International Energy Agency said today in its in-depth review of the country’s energy policies.

Austria’s main challenge in its transition to a cleaner energy future – a challenge shared by many IEA countries – is the decarbonisation of the heating and transport sectors. In fact, Austria’s CO2 emissions have grown since 2014, largely driven by an increase in final energy consumption in buildings and transport. Until recently, Austria risked missing its 2020 mandatory emissions reduction target that covers sectors such as buildings and transport that fall outside the European Union Emission Trading System  – and was also not on track to reach the 2030 target. 

 “At such a critical time for clean energy transitions around the world, I commend the Austrian government’s determination to accelerate the transformation of its energy system,” said Dr Fatih Birol, the IEA’s Executive Director. “The IEA looks forwards to supporting this important policy.”

The IEA welcomes the government’s plans to phase out oil- and coal-fired heating systems by 2035, while ensuring energy security. The IEA also applauds the government’s commitment to a comprehensive tax reform to achieve true-cost pricing for carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in sectors not covered by the EU’s emissions trading system, especially transport.

This in-depth review was finalised before the coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic. The report therefore does not take into account the potential effects of the Covid-19 crisis on Austria’s energy sector and related greenhouse gas emissions.

“As Austria prepares stimulus plans to respond to the Covid-19 and resulting economic crises, the Austrian government should consider how these plans can help to create jobs while supporting the country’s clean energy transition,” said Dr Fatih Birol, the IEA’s Executive Director. “The IEA stands ready to provide advice, based on proven examples of past success and international best practice.”

Austria already has the third highest share of renewable electricity among IEA member countries at 77% of generation in 2018. It aims to raise this to 100% of electricity supply by 2030. This will require a resilient and flexible electricity system capable of accommodating a growing share of variable renewables. Such a system would support the electrification of the economy and the use of demand-side management opportunities offered by digitalisation, although this will require an enabling legal and regulatory framework for more active consumer involvement.

Austria’s vast resources of pumped hydropower storage will play an increasingly important role in both the Austrian electricity market and in the continued integration of the European market. These resources provide storage and flexibility that is needed to accommodate the growing share of variable renewable generation in the Austrian and European electricity systems. Moreover, Austria’s innovative “Greening the Gas” initiative is promoting the conversion of power to renewable gas facilities and seasonal storage of renewable gases, including hydrogen, that would help with the integration of high shares of variable renewables in electricity generation and would also make use of the country’s extensive gas storage facilities.

Austria is set to become an innovation leader in energy through the shift of the government’s research strategy towards implementation-oriented projects that accelerate the commercialisation of emerging technologies. Several innovative demonstration projects applying the use of hydrogen in the industry and transport sectors are continuing in close cooperation with the private sector.  

“I congratulate Austria on having a strong track record in mobilising private sector funding for research, development and innovation,” Dr Birol said. “The IEA also considers Austria’s recent initiative to report on energy research spending in the private sector, broken down by technology fields, as a best practice example among IEA countries.”

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World Bank: META 2 to Modernize the Energy and Mining Sectors in Brazil

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The World Bank Board of Directors approved today a US$38 million loan for the Energy and Mineral Sectors Strengthening Project II (META 2). Under the program, various Brazilian public institutions and sectoral agencies will be offered technical assistance activities varying from studies, training, methodologies, databases and IT equipment.

Brazil’s energy and mining sectors are among the largest in the developing world and are key to the country’s growth. However, both still face challenges to realize their full development potential and promote environmental sustainability and social inclusion. The project will allow the production of more reliable power, at lower prices, and the economic benefits of growing more efficient, resilient and competitive energy and mining sectors.

“The energy and mining sectors are among the main drivers of the Brazilian economy as they form the basis for the sustainability of the industrial and commercial sectors, in addition to leading to the provision of services that are essential for the quality of life of citizens. This project is a continuation of long-term collaboration with the World Bank. This new phase will promote changes to support the sustainable extraction and processing of minerals and metals to meet the needs of the global supply chain for inputs and new technologies. In energy, working together will make it possible to increase the efficiency and resilience of markets in Brazil,” said Bento Costa Lima Leite, Brazil Minister of Mining and Energy.

In Brazil, the electricity, oil and gas and mining and mineral processing sectors represent approximately 3, 13 and 4 percent, respectively, of the country’s Gross Domestic Product (GDP). These sectors, though, stand at different stages of development. The power sector is one of the most sophisticated in Latin America, but it is facing a number of challenges with respect to supply security, affordability and increasing its resilience to climate change. In the natural gas sector, Brazil has started adopting various measures under a new program aimed at establishing an open, dynamic and competitive natural gas market.This has significant potential to enhance energy security and to reduce industrial energy costs, but still needs to solve regulatory and governance issues. The mining sector requires modernization to achieve sustainable practices and a new strategy underpinned by sustainability.

“META’s first phase provided technical assistance to strengthen the capacity of key public institutions to increase the sector’s contributions towards a lower carbon growth path that is environmentally and socially sustainable,” says Paloma Anós Casero, World Bank Director for Brazil. “This second stage aims at increasing efficiency, long term infrastructure adequacy and climate resilience in both sectors, allowing them to grow in a more efficient and competitive way.”

Among the outcomes supported by the Project are:

  • Increase efficiency, long term infrastructure adequacy and climate resilience in the energy and mining sectors;
  • Institutional strengthening of energy and mining institutions to establish and implement strategies, policies and regulation; and
  • Implementation support, monitoring and evaluation, knowledge sharing and dissemination.

This fixed spread loan from the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD) to the Ministry of Energy is guaranteed by the Federative Republic of Brazil and has a final maturity of 20 years, with a 19.5 year grace period.

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Energy Transition at the Heart of Africa’s COVID-19 Response

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The African Union Commission (AUC) and the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) held a virtual high-level dialogue  to discuss Africa’s needs in responding to the COVID-19 crisis and the role of the energy transition in the post-pandemic recovery.

The dialogue brought together a number of ministers and high-level participants from Africa, Europe, the GCC and the European Union, as well as Vice Presidents of the World Bank and African Development Bank (AfDB), the UNDP Administrator, the Director-General of IRENA as well as representatives of the Africa Renewable Energy Initiative (AREI), and Sustainable Energy for All (SEforALL).

During the two-hour virtual event led by H.E. Dr. Amani Abou-Zeid, Commissioner for Infrastructure and Energy, African Union Commission, and IRENA Director-General, Francesco La Camera, participants highlighted that energy potential in Africa can turn the COVID-19 crisis into an opportunity for the continent and its population. They agreed that energy transition is critical to both the response to the crisis and to the post-pandemic recovery.

AU Commissioner Amani Abou-Zeid remarked that: “The energy sector cannot sit back and only react, it has to join in the fight as well while at the same time positioning itself to play a pivotal role in the recovery after the crisis. Through this forum, we hope to share the actions taken by various countries and organisations and the results they have had. This will provide lessons that will be instrumental in shaping the response and preparing for recovery.”

She highlighted the measures that the AU had taken including conducting wide consultations with regional and global stakeholders and developing an emergency, resilience and recovery action plan, which was adopted by the Bureau of African energy ministers on 12th May 2020. 

On his part, IRENA Director-General Francesco La Camera hailed the collaboration with the African Union noting that their commitment to work together in the wake of the pandemic was starting to yield results with the high-level dialogue as a milestone. He noted that: “Accelerating the energy transformation can help Africa respond to COVID-19, while allowing the continent to meet its medium and long-term objectives of a decarbonised, just and prosperous society. IRENA will continue to work closely with the African Union and partners to create pathways for accelerated renewable energy deployment in Africa, to bolster resilience in the face of the current pandemic while building a future of health, wealth and opportunity for millions of people across the continent.”

Emphasising the role of renewables, UNDP Administrator, Mr. Achim Steiner said: “The impact of COVID-19 on African economies is a major setback. Rapid policy responses across the continent have helped to mitigate the health crisis but socio-economic impacts could erode development gains of recent years. Expanding access to electricity through a bold expansion of ‘on-grid’ and ‘off-grid’ renewable energy is a major opportunity in the context of national stimulus and recovery programmes. They are economic, fast, shovel ready options to address energy poverty and accelerate Africa’s transition towards a clean energy economy of the 21st century.”

Participants observed that the adverse impacts of the pandemic are stretching the African energy sector’s capabilities thin. Unless urgent measures are taken to preserve the sector and prepare it for the post-pandemic recovery, the energy situation could impede the continent’s ability to cope with the crisis and economic downturn, ministers noted. Speakers agreed that it is imperative that the COVID-19 pandemic does not dampen efforts to increase energy access and clean cooking solutions which remain a major challenge in Africa. Today, around 548 million people still live without access to electricity and 894 million people lack clean cooking solutions.

The immediate priority for the African continent is to save lives, bring the health emergency under control and alleviate associated economic hardship. However, the recovery measures adopted should also address long-term development and create resilient economies. Utilising the locally available renewable energy resources that Africa is richly endowed with can alleviate immediate energy challenges, while creating jobs, advancing industrial development and promoting human welfare. It is estimated that renewable energy deployment could create an additional 2 million green jobs in Africa.

The meeting took place following an agreement between the two organisations to strengthen cooperation to combat the pandemic and pursue Africa’s development goals.

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