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Urban Development

Unprecedented Global Alliance for Smart City Technology Launched to Counter Growing Tensions

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Fifteen of the world’s leading city networks and technology governance organizations announced today a new partnership to advance the responsible and ethical use of smart city technologies. The G20 Global Smart Cities Alliance on Technology Governance will create global norms and policy standards for the use of connected devices in public spaces. It is the largest and most ambitious undertaking to advance the responsible and ethical use of smart city technologies on a global level.

Smart city technologies can help decrease traffic congestion, combat crime, improve resilience during natural disasters and reduce greenhouse emissions. Without proper governance, these technologies pose significant risk, notably to privacy and security. To ensure data collected in public places is used safely and ethically, the Global Smart Cities Alliance will develop, pilot and collectively implement new global policy standards.

“Our cities stand at a crossroads. Rapid urbanization – if not effectively managed – threatens to paralyse local economies and undermine recent advances in the quality of life,” said Jeff Merritt, Head of IoT, Robotics and Smart Cities at the World Economic Forum. “Smart city technologies offer huge promise, but they can be a Pandora’s box. Today’s announcement is a critical first step to accelerate global best practices, mitigate risks, and foster greater openness and public trust regarding the collection of data in public spaces.”

Established in June 2019 in conjunction with the G20 Summit in Osaka, Japan, the Alliance comprises fifteen of the world’s leading city networks and technology governance organizations. The partners represent more than 200,000 cities and local governments, leading companies, start-ups, research institutions, and civil society organizations. The World Economic Forum serves as the secretariat.

“The advancement of smart cities and communities is critical to realizing Japan’s vision for Society 5.0. It is also essential to addressing the world’s most pressing challenges, including climate change and inclusive economic growth,” said Koichi Akaishi, Vice Minister for Science, Technology, and Innovation for the Cabinet Office of the Government of Japan. “The Government of Japan is proud to have championed this initiative as part of our G20 presidency. We hope that cities will pledge support for the Alliance and participate in its activities to cooperate and form shared global principles in the future.”

Working together with municipal, regional and national governments, private-sector partners and city residents, the Global Smart Cities Alliance has committed to co-design and roll out a first-of-its-kind global policy framework on smart city technologies in advance of the 2020 G20 Summit in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. It is currently accepting nominations from cities and private entities, interested in piloting and contributing to global policy standards. The first policy design workshops with city leaders will be held in November 2019 in conjunction with the Smart City Expo World Congress in Barcelona, Spain. For more information, please visit: http://www.GlobalSmartCitiesAlliance.org.

The Global Smart Cities Alliance’s founding set of institutional partners include: the presidents and host nations of the Group of 20 (G20) in 2019 and 2020; Japan and the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; the Smart City Mission of India; Cities for All; Cities Today Institute; Commonwealth Local Government Forum; Commonwealth Sustainable Cities Network; Connected Places Catapult; Digital Future Society; ICLEI – Local Governments for Sustainability; International Telecommunication Union; Open and Agile Smart Cities; Smart City Expo World Congress; United Cities and Local Governments; What Works Cities; World Economic Forum; and World Enabled.

What leaders are saying about the Global Smart Cities Alliance

“Inequality is no longer an option and needs to be addressed by all spheres of government to be at the centre of every tool we have,” said Emília Saiz, Secretary General of United Cities and Local Governments (UCLG). “We want to bring the voices of all local governments, big and small, to this alliance. When quality of life and humanity are at stake, local governments are the first respondents. Count on UCLG to be critical and committed.”

“The rapid growth and expansion of cities brings both enormous opportunities and significant challenges,” said Kunal Kumar, Joint Secretary and Director of India’s Smart Cities Mission. “India is at the forefront of this urban transformation and is committed to ensuring that our cities develop in a way that is smart and sustainable. The Smart Cities Mission looks forward to working together with city leaders around the world to share best practices and forge new policy standards for the responsible and ethical use of smart technologies in our cities.”

“As urban populations grow, smart city technologies become more and more essential not only to improve the quality of life of citizens but also to simply keep our cities livable,” said Chizuru Suga, Head of the World Economic Forum Centre for the Fourth Industrial Revolution Japan. “However, it would be difficult for cities to face the challenges of these technologies to balance economic development and innovation with the protection of the public, alone. We will commit to supporting these cities, through international cooperation and technology governance.”

“Cities are the solution makers and testbeds of the future,” said Jan Vapaavuori, Mayor of Helsinki, Finland. “Our ability to forward technological advancements and smart city solutions is directly related to the responsible and ethical use of data and technology. Only by creating a joint trust-based framework can we realize the full potential of smart city technologies for the benefit of all mankind in the future.”

“Our message has always been that one city is not a market. If we want a scalable, global market for Smart Cities, this can only happen when people come together to agree common ways of working, to build scalable, interoperable solutions centred around human needs”, said Nicola Yates, CEO of Connected Place Catapult. “That’s why the UK invested in leading the establishment of the first set of smart city standards in 2014 and we are pleased to be joining the Global Smart Cities Alliance partnering with the G20 and World Economic Forum to further this mission and the opportunities this can provide to stimulate growth and improve the lives of citizens around the world.”

“We’ve seen how data and technology can radically transform how cities design and deliver services to residents,” said Simone Brody, Executive Director of What Works Cities. “They enable us to identify the most pressing needs that residents have and provide tailored solutions to address them. They are among the best tools we have to advance economic mobility, and we are excited to partner with the World Economic Forum to advance this effort.”

“The G20 Global Smart Cities Alliance will be critical to minimize the risks and maximize the benefits of rapid urbanization,” said Victor Pineda, President of World Enabled and Co-Founder of Cities for All. “Cities for All and our partners will help ensure that the Alliance can develop new global norms related to access and inclusion. Networks like this can help ensure that we align and can reach the promise of the SDGs and the 2030 Agenda.”

“Smart City Expo World Congress is thrilled to join forces with the World Economic Forum and the G20 Global Smart Cities Alliance in this major challenge of advancing together towards a more sustainable and inclusive urban future,” said Ugo Valenti, Director of Smart City Expo World Congress. “As the world’s leading event for cities, we are committed to help accelerate and implement smart solutions that empower people and make cities a better place to live in.”

“The rapid development of technology is transforming physical and social infrastructure,” said Gino Van Begin, Secretary General of ICLEI – Local Governments for Sustainability. “Smart cities look at the big picture, supporting resource efficiency and technological progress while considering rising challenges like cybersecurity, job loss and privacy. We’re excited to support the G20 Global Smart Cities Alliance in joint pursuit of people-focused smart solutions in cities that lead to a safe, inclusive and sustainable future.”

“I would like to extend my sincere congratulations on the establishment of the Global Smart Cities Alliance,” said Kizo Hisamoto, Mayor of Kobe, Japan. “The City of Kobe has been actively promoting smart city initiatives, including personal health records and autonomous vehicles, but in order to accelerate these efforts even further, last month we launched a new public-private collaboration project, called “Be Smart KOBE”. We believe that establishing standards for data utilization will stimulate the growth of smart cities, and we are looking forward to working together on solving global issues.”

“The Cities Today Institute is excited to join the World Economic Forum’s effort to help cities move quickly from understanding the benefits of digitalization to implementing solutions that will define the citizen experience in a 21st Century Community,” said Bob Bennett, Chair of the Cities Today Institute.

“Open and Agile Smart Cities is proud to be a founding partner of the G20 Global Smart Cities Alliance,” said Martin Brynskov, Chair of Open and Agile Smart Cities, an international smart cities network. “A global framework based on common, open, and minimal mechanisms is needed to de-risk investment and scale up smart city solutions that help tackle the challenges cities are facing in the 21st century – on the individual city’s terms and conditions.”

“Digital Future Society is delighted to join this global alliance led by the World Economic Forum to ensure that cities drive our digital future toward a good common framework,” said Esteban Redolfi, Director of Digital Future Society. “For years, cities have acted as testing grounds for massive technology deployments; now is the moment for cities to lead by sharing learnings and creating guidelines that reinforce a more conscious use of technology. We are committed to analysing, sharing and building on those cases where cities have developed a sustainable and effective path toward a more inclusive and equitable digital future.”

“When we consider smart cities in Asia, fundamental urban challenges such as water and waste disposal, energy efficiency, and low-carbon transport systems are of exceeding importance,” said Fumiko Hayashi, Mayor of Yokohama City, Japan. “In addition to this kind of infrastructure, we also need an integrated discussion on the impact that new technologies such as AI will have on our cities. Here in Yokohama, we are engaged in a pilot public-private collaborative project to support the development of communities centered on the city’s residents. We are working to foster innovative ideas, create networking opportunities, and reduce carbon dioxide emissions.

I hope those involved in smart city development in Asia, including the private sector, international organizations, academia, experts, and businesses in Yokohama, will all take advantage of this initiative.”

“Building an inclusive society is a vital mission, and Eisai Co. is excited to partner with the World Economic Forum to achieve it,” said Keisuke Naito, Chief Digital Officer of Eisai and Member of the Global Internet of Things Council. “We look forward to sharing knowledge and experience through the Global Smart City Alliance, which we believe will become an invaluable forum for enhancing the governance for the benefit of all, regardless of functional impairments or disabilities.”

“NEC is proud to celebrate today’s first step for the G20 Global Smart City Alliance. We are confident that this alliance will become an innovative platform for providing ever-increasing social value to all communities by means of cross-border, open collaboration of people and cities aiming for globally shared goals,” said Nobuhiro Endo, Board Chair of NEC Corporation. “NEC is committed to social value creation in support of safety, security, efficiency and equality, and will continue to contribute to the promotion of globally agreeable technology governance in partnership with the World Economic Forum.”

“Salesforce believes that business is the greatest platform for change and is excited to work toward this goal in partnership with the World Economic Forum and the Centre for the Fourth Industrial Revolution,” said Shinichi Koide, Chairman and CEO Salesforce.com. “Driving social change and sustainable growth is the core of smart city development and we are looking forward to seeing the G20 Global Smart Cities Alliance lead cities to a sustainable world by leveraging the advanced technologies of the Fourth Industrial Revolution.”

“We believe smart cities are crucial to building a future-proof and people-centric society, and Hitachi is proud to work with the World Economic Forum to achieve it,” said Norihiro Suzuki, Vice President and Executive Officer, Chief Technology Officer, and General Manager of the Research & Development Group, Hitachi. “We look forward to contributing our knowledge and experience to the G20 Global Smart Cities Alliance.”

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Urban Development

Guterres promotes ‘enormous’ benefits of greener cities

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For the UN Secretary-General, the benefits of making cities more environmentally friendly are “enormous”, and include reduced climate risk, more jobs, and better health and well-being. 

“City leadership in using green materials and constructing energy-efficient, resilient buildings powered by renewable energy, is essential to achieve net-zero emissions by 2050,” said António Guterres in his message for World Habitat Day, marked on Monday. 

The theme for this year’s celebration of cities and towns worldwide is Accelerating urban action for a carbon-free world. 

Cities are responsible for about 75 per cent of the world’s energy consumption and over 70 per cent of global greenhouse gas emissions.  

Two crises 

Urban areas across the globe are facing the dual crises of COVID-19 and climate change, said the UN chief. 

Around 4.5 billion people live in cities today, but that population is projected to grow by almost 50 per cent, by 2050. By mid-century, over 1.6 billion urban residents may have to survive through average summertime highs of 35 degrees Celsius. 

For Mr. Guterres, cities and towns are at the core of climate action to keep the 1.5 degrees goal within reach. 

“Three-quarters of the infrastructure that will exist in 2050 has yet to be built,” he said. “Economic recovery plans offer a generational opportunity to put climate action, renewable energy, and sustainable development at the heart of cities’ strategies and policies.” 

As populations grow in emerging economies, demand for transport, which accounts for nearly 20 per cent of global carbon emissions, is also multiplying.  

The UN Chief said cities are already working on this, trying to ensure that this demand is met by zero-emission vehicles and public transit. 

Mr. Guterres concluded asking for a global moratorium on internal combustion engines to underpin these efforts, saying it should happen by 2040 at the latest.  

Opportunity 

In a message for the day, Executive Director of UN-Habitat, Maimunah Mohd Sharif, said that, unless the world takes urgent action, “the greenhouse gases produced by ever expanding urban centres, will continue to push global air temperatures higher.” 

Ms. Sharif remembered that, this year, the day is celebrated only weeks before the UN climate change summit, COP26, happening in early November in Glasgow.  

For the UN-Habitat Chief, the recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic is an opportunity for the world’s cities to put climate action on top of their agenda. 

“This is a chance to change how we generate our power, construct our buildings, heat, cool and light up our offices and homes, and travel around from home to work,” she said. 

Ms. Sharif asked for “well planned and well managed compact cities”, that allow for non-motorized transport and that reduce energy consumption from cooling and heating. 

“Cities are the incubators of innovation and new technology,” she said. “We must harness this strength for better climate change solutions.” 

For Ms. Sharif, “action will differ from city to city”, but “the green transition must benefit everyone, especially the most vulnerable, and create new jobs.”  

Activities  

Events this year will explore how governments and organizations can work together with communities, academic institutions and the private sector to create sustainable, carbon-neutral, inclusive cities and towns. 

World Habitat Day will also amplify the Race to Zero Campaign and encourage local governments to develop actionable zero-carbon plans in the run up to the COP26. 

This Monday, in a ceremony in Yaounde, Cameroon, UN-Habitat will also present the winners of the Scroll of Honour awards, one of the world’s most prestigious prizes for those working on sustainable urbanization. 

This year, there are five winners: New Urban Communities Authority, from Egypt; Shining Hope for Communities, from Kenya; Baoji City, from China; Let’s do it World, from Estonia; and Ciudad Emergente, from Chile. 

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Urban Development

City Climate Finance Gap Fund completes first year of operation

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The City Climate Finance Gap Fund (the Gap Fund) has approved technical assistance for 33 cities across the developing world since its operational launch in September 2020, filling a critical gap in technical assistance funding to help cities turn their climate ambitions into finance-ready projects.

Marking its one-year operational launch anniversary today, the Gap Fund has received over 140 expressions of interests and approved technical assistance for 33 cities in India, Mexico, Ethiopia, Morocco, Democratic Republic of Congo, Panama, Senegal, Vietnam, Kosovo, Montenegro, Ecuador, South Africa, Vanuatu, Colombia, Indonesia, Brazil, Guatemala, Uganda and Ukraine. An additional 30 cities are currently undergoing a detailed assessment for potential Gap Fund support, with a total target of at least 180 cities.

The Gap Fund is currently capitalized at €55 million, with a target of at least €100 million and the potential to unlock an estimated €4 billion in investments. The aim is to help cities understand their exposure to climate challenges, develop plans and strategies to reduce emissions and vulnerability to climate risks, and identify and prioritize climate-smart urban infrastructure investments.

The Gap Fund demonstrates a unique collaborative model: With funding from Germany and Luxembourg, the Fund is co-implemented by the World Bank and the European Investment Bank in partnership with the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit and works directly with city groups and networks including GCOM, ICLEI, C40 and CCFLA. This concerted effort has helped raise awareness about the importance of cities and urban systems in the climate agenda and could not come at a more critical time, as the latest Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report confirms that cities are the hotspots of global warming, with the global urban climate finance gap estimated in the trillions of dollars, especially in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa.

The Gap Fund also contributes cutting-edge knowledge, tools and recommendations. For example, by featuring in theState of Cities Climate Finance Report Part 2: Enabling Conditions for Mobilizing Urban Climate Finance, whichprovides critical systems-level conceptual frameworks and recommendations for city, country and climate decision-makers. The Gap Fund has also developed or packaged user-friendly practical tools and notes for operational practitioners and project developers on the ground.

The way cities develop in the coming years, especially in these regions, will influence the trajectory of future greenhouse gas emissions, and the susceptibility of cities to increased flood risks and urban heat island effects. The focus on cities is also reflected in the World Bank’s Climate Action Plan, which has identified cities and urban systems as a focus area on a par with energy, transport, food and industry.

Some of the Gap Fund’s most recent grant activities include:

  • San Miguelito, Panama: Identify climate-smart and energy-efficient urban interventions for new cable car infrastructure, with the potential to cut emissions and reduce vulnerability to floods.
  • Dakar, Senegal: Integrate low-carbon and climate-resilient considerations into the planning, development and construction of affordable and green housing in the greater Dakar region, including piloting  a green building certification incentive for building developers.
  • Mangalore and Kolar, India: Prepare a climate diagnostic report for solid waste management as well as an action plan for improving and financing low-carbon solid waste management services, including a pre-feasibility study.
  • Bogota, Colombia: Provide technical assistance for greenhouse gas and air quality analytics, city-wide coordination and recommendations to incorporate low-carbon and climate-resilient considerations in the Low-Carbon Vital Neighbourhoods in Bogota– the first pilot in Latin America to implement a “Proximity City Urban Development Model” (also known as the 15-minute city model).
  • Chefchaouen, Morocco: Prepare a study on low-carbon solid waste management activities including waste sorting, biogas recovery, leachate treatment and the use of solar energy.
  • Vinnytsia, Ukraine: Support climate change adaptation measures along the Southern Bug River, such as new green spaces along the embankments, development of beaches to improve river transport and the construction of a new bridge to improve walking routes north and south of the city.
  • Campinas, Sao Paolo State, Brazil: Promote climate change adaptation and reduce flood risks through nature-based solutions along the Capivari river.
  • Danané, Côte d’Ivoire: Support the deployment of a fleet of 600 low-carbon, low-cost solar tricycle taxis to meet the city’s most pressing mobility needs for people, including expectant mothers, and cargo.
  • Escuintla, San José and Iztapa, Guatemala: Assess the quality of existing waste generation and characterisation data of municipal solid waste and make any necessary additions, compare organic solid waste treatment alternatives and suggest improvements to the existing organisational structure and governance.
  • Santa Marta, Colombia: Improve and enhance the city’s urban forest and forest management, and identify funding opportunities at regional, national or international level as well as links to other potential natural infrastructure projects along Santa Marta’s ecological corridors.
  • Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: Improve hydrological modelling to assess urban flood risks and economic modelling to assess the viability of restoring wetlands as a natural barrier in flood-prone areas and carry out stakeholder consultations.
  • Makindye Ssabagabo, Uganda: Study existing waste generation, carry out a characterisation study of municipal solid waste using random and seasonal data, and compare organic solid waste treatment alternatives.
  • Palembang, Musi Rawas and Lubuklinggau cities, Indonesia: Prepare a cost-benefit analysis, strategy and action plan for green, resilient construction and energy-efficient affordable housing in these three cities. Project would help inform the national Government One Million Housing program which aims to provide incentives for developers to build 220,000 homes per annum and to upgrade 160,000 affordable homes. 

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Urban Development

WEF Launches Toolbox of Solutions to Accelerate Decarbonization in Cities

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With the percentage of people living in cities projected to rise to 68% by 2050, resulting in high energy consumption, greater infrastructure needs and, carbon emissions, cities have a critical role to play in the race to reach net zero. To help address this challenge, the World Economic Forum, is releasing today the first iteration of its Toolbox of Solutions, designed and built in collaboration with Accenture.

The toolbox is an interactive digital platform containing more than 200 practical solutions to help city leaders, national governments and businesses evaluate and identify optimal solutions for near-term implementation, kick-starting their decarbonization journey. The first-of-its-kind toolbox draws on input and case studies from more than 110 cities, businesses, academics, civil society leaders and other urban stakeholders around the world and across sectors to capture best practices and case studies for urban transformation and decarbonization.

The solutions include policy, business and finance models that result in reduced emissions and other valuable outcomes such as job creation and improved air quality. These solutions are also tailored to specific city attributes including the electricity grid’s health, local population density and income level.

“Decarbonization solutions already exist – we don’t need to wait for the next big innovation. This platform provides examples of policies and business models that have been used successfully around the world. We are starting with 200 solutions and expect to have many more over the course of the next year,” said Kristen Panerali, Head of Energy, Materials and Infrastructure Programme, Net-Zero Carbon Cities, World Economic Forum.

“Urban ecosystems are pivotal in our global journey to net zero, driven by clean and smart electrification. These sustainability initiatives can help accelerate efforts to address climate change with practical and integrated energy solutions for urban transformation for cities of any size around the world,” said Jean-Marc Ollagnier, Chief Executive Officer, Europe, Accenture.

Achieving net-zero emissions at city scale will require a transformation in how energy is produced, distributed, and consumed. A related report shows how the built environment and mobility can serve as a catalyst for urban transformation and decarbonization anywhere in the world.

The Toolbox of Solutions is part of the Forum’s Net-Zero Carbon Cities programme, which brings together businesses with city, regional and national government leaders to accelerate urban transitions to a net-zero future. The programme’s objective is to align and scale efforts across businesses, cities and national-level governments to deliver urban ecosystems that are sustainable, resilient and equitable. The programme aims to enable transformation towards clean electrification and circularity, using integrated energy solutions to address energy, buildings and mobility. The Net-Zero Carbon Cities programme is co-chaired by Jean-Pascal Tricoire, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Schneider Electric, and Francesco Starace, Chief Executive Officer, Enel.

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