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We Have the Climate Solutions – Now We Need the Partnerships

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The World Economic Forum’s third annual Sustainable Development Impact Summit opened in New York City with an affirmation that the world has the science, data, know-how and public awareness to solve the challenge of climate change – what is needed now is intensified collaboration and communication to implement and scale solutions.

“There has never been a better time to mobilize technology and human capabilities to solve global challenges,” Klaus Schwab, Founder and Executive Chairman of the World Economic Forum, told global leaders from government, the private sector and civil society. Speaking of the summit’s goals, Schwab declared: “We need not just urgency, but also direction, perseverance and a true partnership spirit.”

Mark Rutte, Prime Minister of the Netherlands, describing his country’s recently launched initiative to cut carbon emissions 49% by 2030 and 95% by 2050, stressed the importance of broad collaboration and clear communication. “We must bring all of society together,” he said. “If you are not communicating clearly, you are communicating uncertainty.”

Melati Wijsen, Co-Founder, Bye Bye Plastic Bags, explained how at age 12 she and her younger sister started a movement which now, six years later, has banned single-use plastic bags from her home island of Bali. “The power of Bye Bye Plastic bags is that we were youth-led,” Wijsen said. “We, the younger generation, are unstoppable.”

“We can fix this,” said Jesper Brodin, CEO and President, Ingka Group (which includes IKEA), referring to the power of governments, business and communities to solve climate change challenges. He noted that in a survey his company held recently, 90% were deeply concerned about climate change but only 3% knew how to contribute. “The solutions are already here,” he said. “They just require scaling existing technologies. This is why this collaboration is so important.”

Gavin Newsom, Governor of California, said his state is succeeding in cutting emissions while growing its economy at a rate well above the United States average. “California is going through one of the most radical decarbonization programmes in the world,” he said. “We have decided to move away from situational values to sustainable values. If you don’t invest in the future, you won’t do well in it.”

The Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship gave out awards to 40 leaders in social innovation from around the world. This year’s awards included three new award categories – Public Social Intrapreneur, Corporate Social Intrapreneur and Social Innovation Thought Leader – along with the established category of Social Entrepreneur of the Year.

Social entrepreneurs recognized by awards are leading initiatives for clean drinking water, affordable clean energy, digital financial inclusion, online education and sustainable agriculture, among many others.

“Social entrepreneurs are no longer working in isolation – the Schwab Foundation recognizes the champions of social innovation in the social sector but also in business, government and academia. We see social innovation as an ecosystem of pioneering actors with a common purpose,” said Hilde Schwab, Co-Founder and Chairperson of the Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship.

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Climate change: Scientists warn over impact on food security and oceans

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UN climate scientists presented MEPs with new evidence on how climate change is affecting food production and oceans.

The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change is the United Nations body for assessing the science related to climate change. In August, it presented a report on climate change and land and in September one on the oceans and cryosphere in a changing climate. The reports are the latest scientific input for the UN climate summit COP25 to be held in Madrid in December.

The scientists behind the reports presented their findings to Parliament’s environment, development and fisheries committees on Wednesday 6 November.

Food production and climate change a two-way street

Professor Jim Skea told MEPs climate change was exacerbating land degradation, such as erosion and pollution, which in turn affects infrastructure and people’s livelihoods. Better land management can help tackle climate change but it must be complemented by other action, he added.

Dr Jean-François Soussana noted that the food system accounts for between a fifth and a third of all greenhouse gas emissions caused by humans. At the same time, climate change affects food security through declining crops of wheat and maize. He warned that in future the stability of our food supply would decrease further as the magnitude and frequency of extreme weather events increases.

Melting ice, rising seas

According to scientists, the rise in sea level is accelerating, mainly due to the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets melting faster.

Professor Hans-Otto Pörtner warned that in a business as usual scenario the sea level is estimated to rise about five metres by 2300. In addition, in warming oceans marine life has access to less oxygen and nutrients, putting food security at risk for communities dependent on seafood.

Pörtner added: “To minimise the severity of the impact of climate change, every bit of warming matters, each year matters, each choice matters, and most importantly, political and societal will matters.”

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Trade and Development Bank, UNEP to collaborate on climate finance

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In a pledge to continue stepping-up its commitment to climate change mitigation and adaptation action, the Eastern and Southern African Trade and Development Bank (TDB) signed a Memorandum of Understanding today with the UN Environment Programme (UNEP).

The MOU effectively establishes a framework of cooperation through which the two institutions can collaborate in a number of areas critical to the global environmental agenda.

In the field of clean energy finance, TDB and UNEP will work to enhance investment opportunities for both public and private finance to support the dissemination of clean energy technologies. This will include supporting the early stage development and project finance of renewable energy projects, as well as the development of financing mechanisms to allow access to smaller-scale sustainable energy and energy-efficient appliances for household and productive use.

Additionally, the two institutions will cooperate on supporting eligible TDB Member States to access Green Climate Fund resources to enable them to adapt to the changing climate and develop along a low-emission pathway.

“As a member of the International Development Finance Club, a leading global group of development financiers advancing the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and climate finance, TDB works closely with its partners to implement the 2030 SDG Agenda as well as the Paris Climate Agreement. With global partners such as UNEP, we expect to more seriously realize the international commitment to support Africa to grow and develop sustainably,” said Admassu Tadesse, TDB President and Chief Executive.

Michael Awori, TDB Chief Operating Officer, added that “our commitment is evidenced by the fact that 70% of our power sector portfolio is in renewable energy. With this track record, we are the right partner with whom to co-finance and support more sustainable growth and development projects across various sectors.”

“While Eastern and Southern African economic growth continues to be strong, there is great potential to harness clean energy in the region. UNEP and TDB are partnering to support wide dissemination of clean energy technologies and unlock the financial resources needed to meet the challenges of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development,” said Joyce Msuya, Deputy Executive Director of UNEP.

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CLEANTECH: A Catalyst for Climate Action

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On the third day of the 18th Session of its General Conference, the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) organized an event on innovative Cleantech solutions supported by UNIDO and its partners, which showcased their high potential to address environmental challenges, especially as a catalyst for Climate Action and the Clean Energy Transition.

The importance of strong and synergistic network partnerships to fulfill a Cleantech solution’s full impact potential – from situational analysis and needs assessment to full-scale commercialization and deployment – was discussed, with an emphasis on closing the financing gap typically experienced by Cleantech enterprises and project developers.

The event further highlighted the broader elements of innovation and entrepreneurship in the Energy Transition, with entrepreneurs sharing their experiences in starting and scaling up impactful ideas and products. Financing models for Cleantech and innovative solutions were introduced, with a view of transforming the investment paradigms and approaches currently applied to Cleantech. Concurrently, the CTCN support was presented, as also applied to youth, men and women.

As such, the event concluded that Cleantech technologies are a crucial and catalytic factor in implementing the global vision of a low-carbon, climate-resilient and sustainable future for all, as outlined in the Paris Agreement. Furthermore, the event deemed very important that economic opportunities embedded in the low-carbon trajectory are leveraged to become profitable business models for climate and energy solutions.

Finally, the event shared insights and recommendations on how the international development community and the private sector could further support climate action and the clean energy transition by promoting the development and deployment of innovative Cleantech solutions.

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