Connect with us

Tech News

Security of 5G networks: EU Member States complete national risk assessments

Published

on

Following the Commission Recommendation for a common European approach to the security of 5G networks, 24 EU Member States have now completed the first step and submitted national risk assessments. These assessments will feed into the next phase, a EU-wide risk assessment which will be completed by 1 October. Commissioner for the Security Union, Julian King, and Commissioner for the Digital Economy and Society, Mariya Gabriel, welcomed this important step forward and said:

“We are pleased to see that most Member States have now submitted their risk assessments. Following the support expressed by the European Council on 22 March for a concerted approach, Member States responded promptly to our call for concrete measures to help ensure the cybersecurity of 5G networks across the EU. The national risk assessments are essential to make sure that Member States are adequately prepared for the deployment of the next generation of wireless connectivity that will soon form the backbone of our societies and economies.

We urge Member States to remain committed to the concerted approach and to use this important step to gain momentum for a swift and secure rollout of 5G networks. Close EU-wide cooperation is essential both for achieving strong cybersecurity and for reaping the full benefits, which 5G will have to offer for people and businesses.

The completion of the risk assessments underlines the commitment of Member States not only to set high standards for security but also to make full use of this groundbreaking technology. We hope that the outcomes will be taken into account in the process of 5G spectrum auctions and network deployment, which is taking place across the EU now and in the coming months. Several Member States have already taken steps to reinforce applicable security requirements while others are considering introducing new measures in the near future.

We need all key players, big and small, to accelerate their efforts and join us in building a common framework aimed at ensuring consistently high levels of security. We look forward to continuing our close cooperation with Member States as we begin the work on an EU-wide risk assessment, due to be complete by 1 October, that will help to develop a European approach to protecting the integrity of 5G.”

National risk assessments include an overview of:

·    the main threats and actors affecting 5G networks;

·    the degree of sensitivity of 5G network components and functions as well as other assets; and

·    various types of vulnerabilities, including both technical ones and other types of vulnerabilities, such as those potentially arising from the 5G supply chain.

In addition, the work on national risk assessments involved a range of responsible actors in the Member States, including cybersecurity and telecommunication authorities and security and intelligence services, strengthening their cooperation and coordination.

Next Steps

Based on the information received, Member States, together with the Commission and the EU Agency for Cybersecurity (ENISA), will prepare a coordinated EU-wide risk assessment by 1 October 2019. In parallel, ENISA is analysing the 5G threat landscape as an additional input. 

By 31 December 2019, the NIS Cooperation Group that leads the cooperation efforts together with the Commission will develop and agree on a toolbox of mitigating measures to address the risks identified in the risk assessments at Member State and EU level.

Following the recent entry into force of the Cybersecurity Act at the end of June, the Commission and the EU Agency for Cybersecurity will set up an EU-wide certification framework. Member States are encouraged to cooperate with the Commission and the EU Agency for Cybersecurity to prioritise a certification scheme covering 5G networks and equipment.

By 1 October 2020, Member States should assess in cooperation with the Commission, the effects of measures taken to determine whether there is a need for further action. This assessment should take into account the coordinated European risk assessment.

Background

Fifth generation (5G) networks will form essential digital infrastructure in the future, connecting billions of objects and systems, including in critical sectors such as energy, transport, banking, and health, as well as industrial control systems carrying sensitive information and supporting safety systems.

The European Commission recommended on 26 March 2019 a set of concrete actions to assess cybersecurity risks of 5G networks and to strengthen preventive measures, following the support from Heads of State or Government for a concerted approach to the security of 5G networks.

The Commission called on Member States to complete national risk assessments and review national measures as well as to work together at EU level on a coordinated risk assessment and a common toolbox of mitigating measures.

Continue Reading
Comments

Tech News

Deloitte Thailand Unveils Latest Results Digital Transformation Survey 2022

Published

on

Global businesses have been impacted by digital disruption especially over the past few years with the digital adoption rate expedited due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Understanding of digital implementation perspectives and trends is important for companies in Thailand to gain insights on company positioning in comparison to the market.

Deloitte Thailand has been conducted a Digital Transformation survey during the past 3 years (2020-2022) with the objective to examine the attitudes towards digital transformation among companies. In 2020 and 2021, quantitative methodology was adopted with the survey questionnaires while we perceived 2022 as a critical stage of the digital transformation hence additional in-depth interviews with c-suite level respondents were applied on top of a questionnaire. The surveys emphasize on the following topics in order to draw developments of digital transformation implementation before and during the COVID-19 pandemic:

1.     Exploring digital transformation implementations

2.     Unlocking success in digital transformations

3.     Understanding industry snapshots

After the analysis for 2022, we found that 41% of the companies perceived that digital transformation has a moderate impact for businesses. The digital transformation adopted during the COVID-19 pandemic was rather a survival mechanic in response to the situation and as a tool for future differentiation.

The rapid adoption during the early COVID-19 period with 20% companies entering ‘Becoming Digital’ phase was a reactive adoption while in 2022, 43% of companies shifted back to the ‘Doing Digital’ phase as they realized that not all technologies are applicable to the situation and are more selective  in the implementation process across digital for customers, internal assets, and backend processes.

Cyber security and customer centricity are the two aspects most companies found important and prioritized as 30% of the companies have a mature digital plan, investments and innovation in place and integrate customer centricity in company DNA while 43% of the companies have a mature digital plan, investments and innovation in place and intergrade cyber security in company DNA.

In terms of technology, basic technology which are Cloud, traditional web technology and mobile application are the most popular across all sizes of companies since before the COVID-19 while data analytics, categorized as advanced technology, has gained popularity of late. The correlation between the bigger companies and the wider range of technologies invested can be found.

“Digital transformation is the key to protect your enterprise and there is no such thing as a one-size-fits-all journey to future readiness. Executives should carefully choose the one that fits their company best” , said Mr. Viney Hora, Executive Director of Deloitte Consulting

Moreover, since 2020 human resource and digital mindset have faced challenges as in lack of internal and external expertise, immature digital culture and organization silo found in 41%, 31% and 29% of the companies respectively. It is further found that most people still perceive that digital disruption concerns the IT improvements and IT personnel only more than the overall corporate responsibility.

Dr. Narain Chutijirawong, Executive Director, Clients & Industries, Deloitte Thailand, added “Many organisations mistook digital transformation by simply doing digital things and launching new digital projects. But the pandemic shows that this is only an illusion of being digital. Critical changes are needed to the digital mindset.”

The higher digital transformation rate coupled with an immense and unforeseeable impact from the COVID-19 pandemic across all business are evident. Businesses should therefore be more vigilant about the digital transformation movement and the digital environment in the market especially during this unprecedented global event and transitional period.

Continue Reading

Tech News

WEF Announces 100 New Start-ups Joining its Technology Pioneers Community

Published

on

The World Economic Forum today welcomes 100 innovative tech firms to its Technology Pioneers community. Full of young and growing tech companies, the 2022 cohort is forging new paths in healthcare, food production and more with cutting-edge technologies.

This year’s intake includes Emerge, which is improving virtual interactions through the development of a device with tactile effects for users at virtual gatherings. Ampd Energy is reshaping the construction industry by pioneering battery energy storage systems, and Alife is supporting healthcare advances by using artificial intelligence to improve the success rate of IVF.

“The 2022 cohort of Technology Pioneers is already bringing great changes to industries around the world,” said Saemoon Yoon, Technology Pioneers Community Lead, World Economic Forum. “By joining this community these emerging tech leaders can continue to show not only the impressive tech advancements within their firms but also how their companies are helping to build a better future for us all.”

For the first time, over one-third of the selected firms are led by women, well above the industry average. With 2022 Tech Pioneers based in 30 countries – with Viet Nam, Rwanda and the Czech Republic represented for the first time – this year’s cohort is shaping industries around the world.

In Mexico, for example, microTERRA builds on-site water treatment systems with microalgae that transforms wastewater into a sustainable protein source and clean water. Luxembourg’s Mission Space develops a satellite-based space weather intelligence system. In the United States, Bonumose is transforming global food systems with its technology to support the affordable production of healthy alternative sugars such as tagatose and allulose.

Following their selection as Technology Pioneers, this year’s companies will join an impressive group of alumni that include many household names, such as Airbnb, Google, Kickstarter, Mozilla, Spotify, TransferWise, Twitter and Wikimedia.

The 2022 cohort will also be invited to participate in World Economic Forum workshops and events and high-level discussions during their two years in the community.

The 2022 Technology Pioneers include:

Africa

  • Access Afya (Kenya) – High-quality healthcare for the global mass market
  • Ampersand (Rwanda) – Africa’s leading battery-swap energy network for light vehicles
  • Okra (Nigeria) – Digitalizing financial services for Africa
  • Pula Advisors (Kenya) – An insurance and technology company providing comprehensive insurance solutions
  • Sendy (Kenya) – Building fulfilment infrastructure for e-commerce and consumer brands

Asia Pacific

  • Akila (China) – Optimizing buildings, construction and environmental, social and governance
  • Allinfra (China) – Building technology to help institutions achieve their climate goals
  • Ampd Energy (China) – Electrifying construction to eliminate emissions
  • Authing (China) – Enterprise’s next-generation information technology identity infrastructure
  • BioMap (China) – Leveraging artificial intelligence to decipher the complex immune system
  • Booming Tech (China) A virtualization engine platform for a digital oasis
  • Boson Protocol (Singapore) – A universal settlement layer for commerce
  • Digitwin (China) – Providing enterprise metaverse solutions through spatial digital twins
  • Docosan (Viet Nam) – A new gateway for healthcare in Viet Nam
  • EMQ (Singapore) – Enabling real-time, secure and affordable financial services for everyone, everywhere
  • Freed Group (China) – Enhancing performance and commerce capability through FreeDimension technologies and solutions
  • Mint Innovation (New Zealand) – Delivering low-carbon metals critical to electrifying the global economy
  • Mudi (China) – Offering clinical research-based data through the use of artificial intelligence
  • N.THING (Republic of Korea) – Leading innovation in agricultural service and farm-to-table value chains
  • NextBillion.ai (Singapore) – A spatial data platform enabling location artificial intelligence for enterprises
  • Okra Solar (Australia) – Developing hardware and software for sustainable last-mile energy access
  • OnLoop (Singapore) – Transforming clunky performance management into elegant collaborative team development
  • Pandocorp (India) – Making supply chain execution intelligent with a fast logistics cloud
  • Proeon (India) – Creating next-generation plant proteins with superior taste, texture and nutrition
  • Qcraft (China) – Autonomous driving solutions for easy autonomous application with rapid iteration
  • Recykal (India) – Asia’s first circular economy marketplace
  • Reejig (Australia) – Ensuring zero wasted potential in people, business and society
  • RoboticPlus (China) – Providing intelligent robotic products for the construction sector
  • Seoul Robotics (Republic of Korea) – A 3D computer vision company powering the future of autonomy
  • Shinta VR (Indonesia) – Providing impactful immersive technology for education and human development
  • SmartCoin Financials (India) – A tech-driven financial inclusion platform empowering the underserved
  • Vahan (India) – Building a full-stack labour marketplace for blue-collar workers
  • WIZ.AI (Singapore) – Revolutionizing the in-and-outbound call process with conversational voice artificial intelligence
  • XCharge (China) – All-in-one smart electric vehicle charging solution pioneer
  • YesHealth (China) – Building the world’s largest and most efficient vertical farms

Europe

  • Beenova AI (UK) – Scaling education through conversational learning powered by artificial intelligence
  • betteries (Germany) – Upcycling electric vehicle batteries into affordable mobile power systems
  • Circulor (UK) – A proven technology for real-time supply chain traceability
  • Citibeats (Spain) – Ethical artificial intelligence big data analysis
  • Collective Benefits (UK) – Insurance and benefits platform for independent work
  • Cyacomb (UK) – A first line of defence against harmful content online
  • Dendra Systems (UK) – Pioneering ecosystem restoration at scale
  • EJARA (France) – Enabling francophone Africans to build and protect their wealth
  • Embion Technologies (Switzerland) – Platform technology for sustainable nutrition and health solutions from biomass
  • Enerbrain (Italy) – Providing healthier and energy-efficient built environments for people
  • Fluency (UK) – Enabling central bank digital currencies and universal digital payments
  • Mission Space (Luxembourg) – A private satellite-based space weather intelligence system
  • MIWA (Czech Republic) – Preventing the creation of waste from single-use packaging
  • Nu Quantum (UK) – Enabling scalable quantum computing through photonic networks
  • Oxford Quantum Circuits (UK) – Building quantum computers to enable life-changing discoveries
  • Plan A (Germany) – A corporate carbon accounting and decarbonization software solutions provider
  • Proton (Switzerland) – Providing internet services that are private by default
  • Roboze (Italy) – Reshaping manufacturing with a new distributed production model
  • ROCSOLE (Finland) – Insights from harsh process conditions improving industry operational efficiency
  • Somnium Space (UK) – Open, social and persistent virtual reality platform powered by blockchain
  • TechWolf (Belgium) – Developing an enterprise overview of employee skills and gaps
  • Twin Science (UK) – Developing children’s skills through purpose-led STEM learning
  • Wolfprint 3D (Estonia) – Cross-app avatar platform for the metaverse

Latin America

  • Global66 (Chile) – Global financial platform for individuals and small and medium-sized enterprises
  • Houm (Chile) – A digital platform to rent, buy and sell properties online
  • Mamotest (Argentina) – A patient, data-driven, end-to-end solution to defeat breast cancer
  • microTERRA (Mexico) – Powering the plant-based future
  • Pomelo (Argentina) – Infrastructure to launch and scale fintech in Latin America

Middle East and North Africa

  • Eureka Security (Israel) – A data security posture management platform
  • HawKar (Tunisia) – An innovative start-up aimed at people with reduced mobility
  • OCON Healthcare (Israel) – 3D uterine drug delivery to fit women’s anatomy

North America

  • Agerpoint (USA) – Transforming how plants, crops and forests are measured and monitored
  • Alife (USA) – An IVF operating system to improve outcomes and fertility care
  • Aliro Quantum (USA) – Quantum networks for physics-based secure communication and scalable quantum computing
  • AllHere (USA) – AI-powered support for families in primary and secondary schools
  • BEIT (USA) – Providing intellectual property for quantum computer hardware and algorithms
  • Benepass (USA) – Reimagining company staff care with flexible and personalized benefits
  • Bonumose (USA) – Affordable, healthy sugars without sacrificing taste or functionality
  • Butlr Technologies (USA) – Making the built environment people-aware
  • Centrly (USA) – A market intelligence platform accelerating innovation by systematizing partnership search
  • Colossal Biosciences (USA) – The de-extinction company
  • Copia Automation (USA) – Git version control for programmable logic controller (PLC) programming
  • Credo AI (USA) – Operationalizing responsible artificial intelligence
  • CrowdAI (USA) – Enabling organizations of all sizes to deploy computer vision
  • Databento (USA) – Pay-as-you-go for financial market data
  • DNAstack (Canada) – Building technologies to enable responsible biomedical data sharing and discovery
  • DXM (USA) – Technology-driven, on-demand, sustainable manufacturing platform for all
  • Emerge (USA) – Bringing touch and emotion to virtual experiences
  • Everstream Analytics (USA) – Setting the world’s supply chain standard
  • Guidewheel (USA) – Empowering factories to reach sustainable peak performance
  • High Fidelity (USA) – Offering spatial audio technology for next-generation voice communication
  • Horizon Blockchain Games (Canada) – Driving Web3 adoption through easy, fun and powerful blockchain
  • Hubble Technology (USA) – Enabling business resilience through complete visibility into technology assets
  • Ignite (USA) – Accelerating the world’s transition to a decentralized future
  • Journey Foods (USA) – Automating sustainability, nutrition and cost innovation
  • Leap (USA) – Enabling real-time, automatic energy market participation for distributed energy resources
  • LeasePilot (USA) – Helping commercial real estate owners draft their leases faster
  • Manufacture 2030 (USA) – Empowering companies to hit supply chain carbon targets with confidence
  • Nithio (USA) – An artificial intelligence-driven platform for clean energy investment
  • Novoloop (USA) – Upcycling company creating chemicals and materials made from plastic
  • Oolu (USA) – Distributing solar energy solutions in West Africa
  • Plaine Products (USA) – Eliminating single-use plastic from the bathroom
  • Recuro Health (USA) – Pre-emptive digital medical care to lower costs and improve outcomes
  • Resilinc (USA) – A leading supply chain risk monitoring, mapping and resiliency solution
  • Slang (USA) – Artificial intelligence-powered learning platform empowering the workforce with professional English

About the Technology Pioneers

The World Economic Forum believes innovation is critical to the future well-being of society and driving economic growth. Launched in 2000, the Technology Pioneer community comprises early- to growth-stage companies from around the world that are involved in the design, development and deployment of new technologies and innovations and are poised to make a significant impact on business and society.

The community is part of the Global Innovators Community, an invitation-only group of game-changing start-up companies. In addition, the community is also part of the Centres for the Fourth Industrial Revolution Network, where members contribute to shaping new policies and strategies in areas such as artificial intelligence, blockchain and digital assets, the internet of things and autonomous vehicles.

Continue Reading

Tech News

Central African Republic: Supporting Digital Governance and Competitiveness

Published

on

The government of the Central African Republic has made significant efforts in recent years to improve public financial management, including through digitalization of services. Reforms aimed at digitalizing the tax administration have also been introduced.

To support the additional work needed to scale up these reforms, the World Bank approved a $35 million grant for the Public Sector Digital Governance Project and $30 million for the Investment and Business Competitiveness for Employment Project.

“Improving public financial management, transparency, and efficiency is central to the World Bank’s partnership with the Central African government, as is creating job opportunities for youth through a better private sector development,” said Han Fraeters,World Bank Country Manager for the Central African Republic.Despite the difficult circumstances facing the country, it is important to remain engaged on an agenda that brings sustainable development impact to the people of the Central African Republic.”

Weak governance poses a challenge to sustainable economic growth and shared prosperity in the Central African Republic, which ranks 154th out of 180 countries in the 2021 Transparency International Corruption Index. The formal private sector remains small and is constrained by structural challenges, including limited access to finance, inadequate infrastructure, lack of skilled workers, deficiencies in the legal and regulatory frameworks, and a fragile security environment.

Financed by an International Development Association (IDA)* grant:

The Public Sector Digital Governance Project seeks to (i) improve efficiency and transparency of public financial management and (ii) lay the foundation for digital governance in order to provide public services that foster confidence and inclusion. For example, the project will facilitate the payment of salaries to employees working remotely from their duty stations.          

The Investment and Business Competitiveness for Employment Project is supporting climate investment reforms, improving access to credit, and supporting SMEs and young workers. The beneficiaries will include young people seeking to strengthen their skills for employment, SMEs, and large enterprises. The project will strengthen the capacity of businesses in the areas of management, marketing, finance, business planning, and digital skills. Roughly 1,900 graduates/interns will benefit from economic inclusion programs in at least 514 local enterprises that will provide training or employment in selected trades.

Continue Reading

Publications

Latest

Trending