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EU gas market: New rules agreed will also cover gas pipelines entering the EU

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New rules setting out a clear regulatory framework to operate gas pipelines inside the EU and from non-EU countries were provisionally agreed between MEPs and member states.

An overhaul of EU gas market rules was informally agreed on Tuesday evening. The amended rules will cover both internal EU gas pipelines as well as all gas pipelines from non-EU countries into the EU, creating legal clarity for existing and new gas infrastructure.

he rule stating that ownership of gas transmission infrastructure must be separate from that of the gas already applies to EU pipelines. With the new legislation, this would be applicable to all gas pipelines in the EU as a general rule, even if they originate outside of the European Union, with the possibility for derogations for existing gas pipelines and exemptions for new ones.

New gas pipelines from non-EU countries

The new rules give exclusive competence to the EU when it comes to agreements on new EU gas lines with non-EU countries. The member state in which the pipeline’s first entry point is located shall consult the non-EU country concerned before deciding on an exemption based on EU rules. The Commission will take the binding decision on whether to grant the exemption. If the member state’s assessment differs from that of the Commission, it is the Commission’s assessment which prevails.

The Commission may also authorise a member state to open negotiations with a non-EU country, unless it considers this to be in conflict with EU law or detrimental to competition or security of supply. Before signing such an agreement, the member state shall notify the text of the agreement to the Commission and receive its authorisation to sign.

The European Parliament also included in the text that under no circumstances should an agreement between a member state and a non-EU country lead to the implementation of this directive being delayed. Member states will have nine months to bring their national legislation in line with this directive.

Existing gas pipelines from non-EU countries

For derogations for existing pipelines (connected to EU pipelines before the entry into force of this directive), the member state in which the first entry point of the pipeline is located may derogate from the new rules, provided this derogation is not detrimental to competition in the EU. Member states can decide on a derogation within one year after the entry into force of the directive. If the pipeline is located in the territory of more than one member state, it shall consult the other member states before granting such a derogation.

After the deal was reached, rapporteur Jerzy Buzek (EPP, PL) said: “Many wanted to see these negotiations fail as, without this agreement, EU rules would not be applicable to gas pipelines from non-EU countries. With today’s deal, all future gas pipelines from non-EU countries, including Nord Stream 2, will have to abide by EU rules. This has always been the main goal of the European Parliament and I am delighted that this is today confirmed in the agreement with the Council.”

Next steps

The deal will now be put to the Industry, Research and Energy Committee and plenary for approval as well as to the Council. The Directive will enter into force 20 days after publication in the Official Journal.

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UNIDO advocates for sustainable energy at EUSEW

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photo: UNIDO

For the second consecutive year, the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) took an active part in the European Union’s Sustainable Energy Week (EUSEW) in Brussels, which focused on ‘Shaping Europe’s Energy Future’. “Ongoing research and collaborative actions between the European Union and Africa are crucial to renew the partnership”, said UNIDO Climate Change Expert Cassandra Pillay. “The aim of this event is to facilitate policy debates and strengthen partnerships between the two continents across private and public sectors”.

Pillay participated in the session “EU-AFRICA Long term Partnership on Sustainable Energy: The Role of Research & Innovation”, with UNIDO also contributing to the “Transport, Energy and Digitalisation – City and Industry Views” session, which was jointly organized by ERTICO-ITS Europe, EUROCITIES, ORGALIM and UNIDO. The session addressed the synergies between the transport, energy and digital sectors to achieve sustainable energy policy goals and aimed at enhancing the value of actions and cross-sectoral work programmes.

The EUSEW is a flagship event organized by the European Commission to bring awareness about renewable and efficient energy use across Europe, which brings together public authorities, private companies, NGOs and consumers to promote initiatives to save energy and move towards renewables for clean, secure and efficient power. More than 4,000 registered participants attended.

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IEA Technology Collaboration Programme holds its third universal meeting

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Innovators and strategic thinkers from around the world discussed key trends in energy technology and research at the meeting. (Photograph: IEA)

Leading energy experts from the public and private sector gathered in Paris on 18 and 19 June for the third universal meeting under the International Energy Agency’s Technology Collaboration Programme (TCP).

Innovation is an essential underpinning of energy sector transitions worldwide. Given the growing complexity and interconnection of energy systems, cooperation and networking can increase effectiveness and maximise the impact of innovation efforts.

“2019 is a key year for innovation at the IEA,” said Dr Fatih Birol, the IEA’s Executive Director. “A more integrated and holistic approach to energy technology innovation is required to reach a sustainable energy future, which means even more partnerships among those in this room.”   

For more than 40 years, the vast amount of research and technology analysis carried out under the TCP network has provided a vital contribution to advancing clean energy technologies worldwide. The TCP currently has some 6,000 participants representing 300 government and industry entities from 54 countries, demonstrating the reach of the TCP’s global innovation network. This body of knowledge supports high-level debates and real-world actions.

The first day of this week’s event was jointly hosted by the IEA Committee on Energy Research and Technology and the IEA Standing Group on Long-Term Co-operation. It brought together policy and decision makers to share experiences on disruptive innovation, technology trends, and partnerships between governments, the private sector and other energy stakeholders.

The meeting provided an opportunity for innovators and strategic thinkers to discuss key trends, which will help to inform future IEA activities related to energy technology, research and innovation. That includes the preparations for the 2019 IEA Ministerial and the 2020 edition of Energy Technology Perspectives, one of the IEA’s major publications.

At the meeting, the IEA unveiled new tools and online resources available under its energy innovation web portal, including a study mapping international partnerships relevant to energy technology innovation in order to identify synergies and foster strategic engagement across initiatives. The IEA Secretariat also outlined plans for a major effort to modernise the TCP legal mechanism, further explore how the IEA can make better use of TCP work and improve communication across the TCP network.

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UNDP and IRENA Join Forces to Advance Low-Carbon Energy Transition

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photo: IRENA

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) announced a global partnership today to accelerate low-carbon energy transition and offer concrete steps to achieve sustainable development.  Under the cooperation, the organizations will explore joint initiatives aimed at accelerating the implementation of the Agenda 2030 and stimulating renewable energy investments in developing countries.

“The latest evidence shows that renewable energy sources will increasingly form the backbone of our global energy system, making it imperative to better support countries in making the transition to renewable energy sources and in realizing the multiple benefits they offer,” said UNDP Administrator Achim Steiner at the signing of the Memorandum of Understanding with IRENA Director-General Francesco La Camera in New York. “This partnership does just that by uniting IRENA’s technical expertise on renewable energy with UNDP’s global portfolio on climate change.”

The falling cost of renewable energy means renewables are now frequently the cheapest source of new power generation, according to a new IRENA report. Furthermore, jobs in the sector continued to show growth in 2018. IRENA’s most recent jobs data shows due to more and more countries manufacturing and installing renewables, renewable energy employment reached eleven million people worldwide in 2018, up from 10.3 million in 2017. This, despite slower growth in key renewable energy markets last year including China.

These reports come on the heels of a report released in the United States in April which stated that, for the first time ever, the renewable energy sector in the United States was projected to generate more electricity than coal-fired plants. 

“Partnerships such as this strengthen the world’s response to the profound challenges of climate change and sustainable development,” said Francesco La Camera, Director-General of IRENA. “This cooperation brings together IRENA’s technical knowledge and renewable energy data repository, with the UNDP’s vast global development and project implementation network. Such complementarity will allow us to explore and co-develop effective pathways to advance energy access, accelerate the low-carbon energy transition and promote sustainable growth.

UNDP is the primary supporter of climate action in the United Nations. Building on its portfolio of USD 3.2 billion in grant financing in collaboration with the vertical funds, bilateral and multilateral partners, UNDP provides financial and technical support to countries to design and implement Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) under the Paris Agreement.

Throughout this work, UNDP promotes NDC approaches and implementation processes to align climate and Sustainable Development Goal targets, including on energy, into long-term national and sectoral development plans and budgets, establishing joint coordination mechanisms among actors across sectors and Ministries, prioritizing finance channeled to bold actions and integrating monitoring and reporting systems.

The partnership with IRENA will help to scale-up support to countries and accelerate the delivery of the Paris Agreement and the Sustainable Development Goals.

IRENA

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