Connect with us

Newsdesk

Feminist Advertising Agency is tackling Gender Stereotypes in France

Newsroom

Published

on

Ms Christelle Delarue, founder and CEO of Mad&Women advertising company

On 25 October, Ms Christelle Delarue, founder and CEO of Mad&Women advertising company, gave a talk on “Fighting Gender Stereotypes through Innovative Solutions with ‘Feminist Advertising’” for Gender Views at UNESCO Headquarters in Paris.

Through the perspective of the private sector, and in particular the advertising industry, Ms Delarue described what it means to work for feminist advertising, and how the advertising industry can become a strong ally to advocate for gender equality through the media.

Ms Delarue explained that although women represent the biggest emerging market in the world – women influence 85% of the global economy – 91% of them still feel that advertisers do not understand them. One of the reasons for this phenomenon is that only 3% of creative directors in the world are women. Mad&Women fights against gender stereotypes to make sure women feel represented, respected and empowered through the media.

In today’s media, women have 48% more chance of being represented in their kitchen, while 82% of experts roles in advertising are filled by men, including in some ads that seem to promote gender equality and women’s empowerment. To fight against these reductive and belittling stereotypes, Ms Delarue emphasized the need to end misrepresentation of women and to say no to “Femwashing”, defined as marketing tools stereotyping women to increase sales.

Ms Delarue noted that her approach can be defined as “Femvertising”, which is when advertisements employ pro-female talent, messages and imagery to empower women and girls thus delivering a positive social impact. The “Femvertising” concept has become a business interest for brands that have the courage to commit to real gender equality through their brand communication and within their companies.

Ms Delarue’s presentation was followed by a very interactive Q&A session with the audience. The questions touched upon whether Mad&Women can work with masculine industries, how to improve the visibility of this work outside the feminist circles and how education can change gender stereotypes.

For UNESCO’s Director for Priority Gender Equality, Ms Saniye Gülser Corat, the advertising industry being at the heart of the private sector, “it is crucial to identify and challenge gender stereotypes in advertising to promote women’s empowerment and gender equality”.

UNESCO

Continue Reading
Comments

Newsdesk

Harmonizing and Improving Statistics in West Africa

Newsroom

Published

on

The Board of the World Bank Group has allocated today a total of $379 million in International Development Association (IDA)* credits and grants to help harmonize and strengthen statistical systems in seven West African countries, namely Burkina Faso, Cabo Verde, Cote d’Ivoire, Ghana, Liberia, Sierra Leone and Togo, and to support the African Union (AU) and the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) in their efforts to deepen regional integration in Africa.

The new project, Harmonizing and Improving Statistics in West Africa (HISWA), aims to strengthen the statistical systems of participating countries and regional and sub-regional bodies, in order to help them harmonize, produce, disseminate and enhance the use of core economic and social statistics.

Good data are essential to address the socio-economic development challenges facing the West Africa region in general, and the seven beneficiary countries in particular. Regular population censuses, household surveys, data of critical social concerns and key economic statistics such as agricultural and enterprise censuses and surveys are key to inform the decision-making process, enable efficient allocation of resources, and assess the effects of development policies and interventions. Despite progress over the past 20 years, institutional weaknesses and inconsistent financing limit the quality of statistics in West Africa, leading to poor knowledge management and difficulties in addressing emerging challenges in various development sectors.

HISWA is a regional project that will stimulate demand for data and increase the capacity of the National Statistics Offices in the beneficiary countries. Key activities include, inter alia: the harmonization of methodologies by the ECOWAS Commission; strengthened production of core economic and social statistics, including demographic and poverty statistics, national accounts and price statistics; the improvement of targeted administrative statistics; capacity-building, data dissemination; and institutional reforms. The project will also help to improve and modernize physical and statistical infrastructure to help achieve its stated objectives.

High-quality and harmonized statistics are essential to support economic activity and regional integration as a way to address some of the key challenges facing countries in West Africa”, says Ms. Deborah Wetzel, World Bank Director of Regional Integration for Africa. “Through its regional approach, the HISWA will allow for more cost-effective data and harmonization of data across countries, which is instrumental in key areas such as promotion of free trade, convergence of economic policies, and many others”, she added.

Beyond the National Statistics Offices and the regional bodies, HISWA will provide reliable microdata, data platforms and statistics bulletins to a larger audience, including universities, researchers, students and the general public.

The project is also relevant to the Strategy for Harmonization of Statistics in Africa (SHaSA2), the continent-wide initiative aimed at addressing the constraints facing African statistical systems and promoting its regional integration agenda. It also supports the implementation of ECOWAS’s regional strategy 2019-2023 that aims to raise the living standards of its member country populations. By generating data critical to national and regional planning and monitoring, the project remains well aligned with the World Bank Group’s Regional Integration and Cooperation Assistance Strategy for Sub-Saharan Africa and will help strengthen the connection between regional policy commitments and national planning.  

Continue Reading

Energy News

Battery Storage Paves Way for a Renewable-powered Future

Newsroom

Published

on

photo:IRENA

Battery storage systems are emerging as one of the key solutions to effectively integrate high shares of solar and wind renewables in power systems worldwide. A recent analysis from the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) illustrates how electricity storage technologies can be used for a variety of applications in the power sector, from e-mobility and behind-the-meter applications to utility-scale use cases.

Utility-scale batteries, for example, can enable a greater feed-in of renewables into the grid by storing excess generation and by firming renewable energy output. Furthermore, particularly when paired with renewable generators, batteries help provide reliable and cheaper electricity in isolated grids and to off-grid communities, which otherwise rely on expensive imported diesel fuel for electricity generation.

At present, utility-scale battery storage systems are mostly being deployed in Australia, Germany, Japan, United Kingdom, the United States and other European countries. One of the larger systems in terms of capacity is the Tesla 100 MW / 129 MWh Li-ion battery storage project at Hornsdale Wind Farm in Australia. In the US-State of New York, a high-level demonstration project using a 4 MW / 40 MWh battery storage system showed that the operator could reduce almost 400 hours of congestion in the power grid and save up to USD 2.03 million in fuel costs.

In addition, several island and off-grid communities have invested in large-scale battery storage to balance the grid and store excess renewable energy. In a mini-grid battery project in Martinique, the output of a solar PV farm is supported by a 2 MWh energy storage unit, ensuring that electricity is injected into the grid at a constant rate, avoiding the need for back-up generation. In Hawaii, almost 130 MWh of battery storage systems have been implemented to provide smoothening services for solar PV and wind energy.

Globally, energy storage deployment in emerging markets is expected to increase by over 40% each year until 2025.

Figure 1. Stationary battery storage’s energy capacity growth, 2017-2030

Currently, utility-scale stationary batteries dominate global energy storage. But by 2030, small-scale battery storage is expected to significantly increase, complementing utility-scale applications. 

The behind-the-meter (BTM) batteries are connected behind the utility meter of commercial, industrial or residential customers, primarily aiming at electricity bill savings. Installations of BTM batteries globally is on the rise. This increase has been driven by the falling costs of battery storage technology, due to the growing consumer market and the development of electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid EVs (PHEVs), along with the deployment of distributed renewable energy generation and the development of smart grids. In Germany, for example, 40% of recent rooftop solar PV applications have been installed with BTM batteries. Australia aims to reach one million BTM batteries installations by  2025, with 21 000 systems installed in the country in 2017. 

Figure 2. Services provided by BTM battery storage systems

Overall, total battery capacity in stationary applications could increase from a current estimate of 11 GWh to between 180 to 420 GWh, an increase of 17- to 38-fold.

Read IRENA’s full Innovation landscape briefs on Utility-scale batteries and Behind-the-Meter batteries

Find more information about enabling technologies in IRENA’s Innovation Landscape briefs: Enabling Technologies

Continue Reading

Newsdesk

Somalia to Receive Debt Relief under the Enhanced HIPC Initiative

Newsroom

Published

on

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank’s International Development Association have determined that Somalia has taken the necessary steps to begin receiving debt relief under the enhanced Heavily Indebted Poor Countries (HIPC) Initiative. Somalia is the 37th country to reach this milestone, known as the HIPC Decision Point.

Debt relief will help Somalia make lasting change for its people by allowing its debt to be irrevocably reduced from US$5.2 billion at end-2018 to US$557 million in net present value terms (NPV) once it reaches the HIPC Completion Point in about three years’ time. As Somalia continues on its path towards stability and development after 30 years outside the international financial system, the immediate normalization of its relations with the international community will re-open access to critical additional financial resources to strengthen the economy, help improve social conditions, raise millions out of poverty, and generate sustainable employment for Somalis.

“We welcome Somalia’s efforts to restore stability, engage with creditors, and adopt a poverty reduction strategy,” said World Bank Group President David Malpass. “Resumption of regular financing to Somalia is an important landmark, and we look forward to further economic and social progress.”

I would like to congratulate the Somali government and people for their intense efforts over the past years leading to this momentous event,” said Kristalina Georgieva, IMF Managing Director. “Successful reform efforts have laid the foundation for inclusive economic growth and for addressing the needs of the country’s most vulnerable people. Work must continue to sustain and expand the implementation of these reforms as Somalia starts a new chapter of its history. I am confident a more resilient and prosperous future lies ahead for the people of Somalia.”

The Government and People of Somalia are very pleased by the IMF’s and World Bank Group’s decision which allows Somalia to fully re-engage with International Financial Institutions. This decision is an important milestone which presents ample opportunities for Somalia as it relentlessly pursues its ongoing reform processes as well as its recovery and development agenda,” said Hassan Ali Khayre, Prime Minister, Federal Government of Somalia. “The journey leading to this decision required hard work, dedication and partnership. The FGS expresses its appreciation to the IMF, World Bank Group and partners for their unwavering support and to the Somali people for their patience and resilience in this journey.”

Somalia has committed to maintaining macroeconomic stability; implementing a poverty reduction strategy; and putting in place a set of reforms focused on fiscal stability, improving governance and debt management, strengthening social conditions, and supporting inclusive growth in order to reach the HIPC Completion Point. The World Bank and IMF will continue working together to provide the technical assistance and policy guidance the authorities need to achieve these goals, including in the context of the new, three-year IMF financial arrangement.

In addition, the World Bank is considering a range of new IDA investments with a focus on immediate relief for communities impacted by flooding, the locust invasion as well as preparing for the fast-moving threat of COVID-19. The leadership of the World Bank Group and the International Monetary Fund expressed thanks to their member countries of all regions and income levels, in particular Italy, Norway, Qatar, and the United Kingdom, together with the EU, whose interventions catalyzed support and provided the necessary financial resources to help Somalia reach the Decision Point.

Details of the Debt Relief Operation

At the start of the HIPC process, Somalia’s public- and publicly-guaranteed external debt was estimated at US$5.2 billion in NPV terms. Application of traditional debt relief mechanisms reduces this debt to US$3.7 billion.

Additional debt relief under the enhanced HIPC Initiative is estimated at US$2.1 billion in NPV terms. Of this amount, US$843 and US$1,225 million is projected to be provided by official multilateral and bilateral creditors, respectively.

Paris Club creditors are expected to make a decision on debt relief by the end of March 2020. The largest Paris Club creditors are the United States, Russia, Italy, and France. The IMF Executive Board has approved interim debt relief on debt service falling due to the IMF in the period between the HIPC Decision and Completion Points. At the HIPC Completion Point, Somalia’s current debt due to the IMF will be paid with the proceeds of financial contributions that have been received from over 100 IMF members, including many low-income countries.

MDRI debt relief from IDA and the African Development Bank would cancel all remaining claims at the Completion Point.

Together, Somalia’s external debt burden is expected to fall from about US$5.2 billion (110.7 percent of GDP) in NPV terms as of end-2018 to US$557 million (9 percent of GDP) once the Completion Point is reached.

IMF and World Bank Arrears Clearance Operations

Arrears to IDA were cleared on March 5, 2020 through bridge financing provided by the government of Norway, reimbursed with the proceeds of a Development Policy Grant.

Arrears to the IMF were cleared on March 25 with the assistance of bridge financing from the government of Italy, which the authorities have reimbursed using the front-loaded access under the new IMF financial arrangement.

Arrears to the African Development Bank were cleared on March 5, 2020 through bridge financing provided by the government of the United Kingdom and a contribution from the EU. The bridge loan from the UK was reimbursed by the proceeds of a Policy Based Operation Grant.

The HIPC Initiative

In 1996, the World Bank and IMF launched the HIPC Initiative to create a framework in which all creditors, including multilateral creditors, can provide debt relief to the world’s poorest and most heavily indebted countries to ensure debt sustainability, and thereby reduce the constraints on economic growth and poverty reduction imposed by the unsustainable debt-service burdens in these countries. To date, 37 HIPC countries, including Somalia, have reached their decision points, of which 36 have reached the completion point.

The MDRI

Created in 2005, the aim of the Multilateral Debt Relief Initiative (MDRI) is to reduce further the debt of eligible low-income countries and provide additional resources to help them reach their development objectives. Under the MDRI, three multilateral institutions – the World Bank’s IDA, the IMF and the African Development Fund– provide 100 percent debt relief on eligible debts to qualifying countries, at the time they reach the HIPC Initiative Completion Point.

Continue Reading

Publications

Latest

Newsdesk1 hour ago

Harmonizing and Improving Statistics in West Africa

The Board of the World Bank Group has allocated today a total of $379 million in International Development Association (IDA)*...

Economy3 hours ago

The reforms and the current situation of the State budget and accounts

As we have all realized, since the COVID-19 epidemics broke out the number of regulations enacted – especially by the...

Green Planet5 hours ago

Covid-19 crisis and Earth Hour: An opportunity to reflect on the deteriorating health of the planet

Earth Hour 2020 on Saturday 28 March presents a unique opportunity this year: shining a light on biodiversity loss and climate change during the coronavirus outbreak. All of us will be...

Energy News7 hours ago

Battery Storage Paves Way for a Renewable-powered Future

Battery storage systems are emerging as one of the key solutions to effectively integrate high shares of solar and wind...

Middle East9 hours ago

The rapport between Iran and Turkey over Syria: Liaisons or tussle?

The two powers of Iran and Turkey constitute a crucial feature on the map of the Middle East. The influence...

East Asia12 hours ago

The Thucydides’ Trap: the Avoidable Destiny Between the US and China

The controversial “Thucydides trap” argument has sparked a heated debate since 2013, when President Xi Jinping of China told a...

Newsdesk14 hours ago

Somalia to Receive Debt Relief under the Enhanced HIPC Initiative

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the World Bank’s International Development Association have determined that Somalia has taken the necessary...

Trending