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UK and seven major companies join campaign for vehicle electrification

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The United Kingdom (UK) and seven major companies today joined the EV30@30 campaign, which aims to speed up the deployment of electric vehicles and target at least 30 percent new electric vehicle sales by 2030.

The expanded membership will strengthen the collective and coordinated approach to meeting the EV30@30 objectives. With the UK, the campaign now has the support of most of the largest EV markets worldwide. The existing members are Canada, China, Finland, France, India, Japan, Mexico, the Netherlands, Norway and Sweden.

The addition of companies active on the electric mobility front is also a milestone for the initiative, which was started last year by the Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM). It represents a major step forward in the campaign’s multi-stakeholder approach and reflects the reality of the electric mobility transition that is taking place on the ground. The companies are: ChargePoint, Enel X, E.On, Fortum, Iberdrola, the Renault-Nissan-Mitsubishi Alliance and Vattenfall.

The EV30@30 campaign is organized by the CEM-Electric Vehicles Initiative (EVI), coordinated by the International Energy Agency. The campaign was launched during the 8th Clean Energy Ministerial (CEM8), held in Beijing in June 2017.

Since then, the EV30@30 campaign has succeeded in bringing together over thirty leading cities from twelve countries on the topic of urban electrification via the Pilot City Programme. This initiative acknowledges that cities are running at the forefront of the electric mobility transition and intends to demonstrate how local- and national-level cooperation brings about more successful and sensible policies.

The campaign’s target of 30 percent new electric vehicle sales by 2030 applies collectively to the CEM-EVI membership, and not to individual countries. Governments who endorse the goal show leadership by establishing policies to reach the target and engage through EVI to report progress and share best practices.

The EVI recognizes the importance of reducing carbon emissions in the transportation sector, which accounts for almost a quarter of global greenhouse gas emissions and is one of the fastest-growing energy end use sectors. It also recognizes the importance of working towards energy efficiency and the mitigation of air pollution from transportation.

These environmental, economic and social goals can be addressed through accelerated electrification of the transportation sector. In 2017, the global electric car stock reached more than 3 million vehicles, after growing exponentially for the last ten years, according to the latest Global EV Outlook report. In the report’s EV30@30 scenario, where all countries together achieve the EV30@30 target on average, over 220 million electric vehicles (light-duty vehicles, buses and trucks) are deployed by 2030.

The campaign supports the market for 2-3 wheelers, electric passenger cars, light commercial vans, buses and trucks (including battery-electric, plug-in hybrid, and fuel cell vehicle types). It also works towards the deployment of charging infrastructure to supply sufficient power to the vehicles deployed. Through EV deployment progress monitoring, analytical activities and policy recommendations, the EVI also aims at providing countries with informed material for the implementation of the most effective electric mobility policies possible.

The campaign also aims to foster cooperation among many stakeholders on electric mobility to exchange experiences and deliver quality capacity building to policy makers and other electric mobility stakeholders in EVI countries and beyond.

The EV30@30 campaign is also supported by C40, the FIA Foundation, the Global Fuel Economy Initiative (GFEI), the Natural Resource Defence Council (NRDC), the Partnership on Sustainable, Low Carbon Transport (SLoCaT), The Climate Group, UN Environment, UN Habitat, and the International Zero Emission Vehicle Alliance (ZEV Alliance). It also received the backing of the Hewlett Foundation, the Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st century (REN21) and the World Resources Institute (WRI) this year.

The CEM is a unique partnership of 26 members, including most of the G20 economies, representing 90% of clean energy investment and working together to accelerate the global energy transition. CEM-EVI participants include Canada, Chile, China, Finland, France, Germany, India, Japan, Mexico, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States.

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“The electrification of transportation is a priority for the Government of Canada as demonstrated by our role as co-chair of the Electric Vehicle Initiative, and our ongoing support for the EV30@30 campaign. Canada looks forward to furthering this dialogue as hosts of the CEM/Mission Innovation Ministerial meetings in Vancouver in 2019, as we continue on the path to a low-carbon transportation future.”

– The Honourable Amarjeet Sohi, Canada’s Minister of Natural Resources

“Clean and decarbonised transports are key to reduce air pollution, fulfill the Paris Agreement and build a carbon-neutral world by 2050. Their development is one of the priorities of the French Climate Plan and the future Orientation Law on mobilities. France will act firmly to multiply by 5 the sales of electric vehicles by 2022 while public infrastructure network will be reinforced. France also encourages international actions, through cooperation and initiatives such as EVI or the Transport decarbonisation Alliance, to meet this global challenge. ”

– Elisabeth Borne, Minister for Transport, France

“The Paris Climate Agreement of 2015 gives a boost to the ambitions of the Netherlands in e-mobility, the transition to renewable energy and business opportunities in the field of charging infrastructure and the automotive sector. It’s our goal to have 100% of all new registered cars in 2030 being zero-emission cars.”

– Stientje van Veldhoven, State Secretary for Infrastructure and Water Management, The Netherlands.

“Electrifying the transport sector is an important part of the efforts to end fossil fuel dependence and to achieve Sweden’s goal of reducing transport sector emissions by 70 per cent by 2030. EVI is a key international initiative that promotes and supports electric vehicles to help reduce emissions in the transport sector in Sweden and globally”

– Ibrahim Baylan, Swedish Minister for Policy cooperation and Energy

“Our investors, customers and drivers have trusted ChargePoint to deliver solutions that not only combat climate change but will usher in the adoption of cleaner, more sustainable transport. Our efforts to support climate action are a byproduct of a decades long effort to build a successful business that has resulted in a comprehensive portfolio of technologies that enable people around the world to drive a better way.”

– Pasquale Romano, President and CEO ChargePoint

“Joining this initiative is of paramount importance to raise awareness and consensus about e-mobility’s benefits from an environmental, industrial and energy efficiency perspective. With this aim, Enel X is supportive of every private and public effort that further boosts EV uptake and that sets out concrete plans for the business, as well as becoming a driver of internal growth through the adoption of concrete initiatives that promote the e-mobility culture among our employees.”

– Francesco Venturini, CEO of Enel X

“It took us close to 20 years to reach the first million electric vehicles. It took 18 months to reach the second million and an additional eight months to reach the third million. During the past six months, we globally reached four million electric vehicles. This trend needs to continue exponentially if we are to reach the targets set out by the Paris Agreement. We continue to charge ahead by building the needed infrastructure for electric vehicles all across Europe. The future is electric and the EV30@30 campaign helps us reach the future we all want.”

– Tore Harritshoj, CEO, Mobility & LifeCycle Solutions Nordic, E.ON

“Today, road transport accounts for more than 40% of global oil demand. At Fortum we strongly believe that the electrification of transport is one of the crucial elements in limiting air pollution and preventing further climate change. The ultimate need to improve air quality and limit emissions, as well as reduce noise caused by vehicles, is increasingly pressing in most urban areas. We are helping to tackle the challenge by offering customers convenient, affordable and accessible services in electromobility, and by developing cloud services and infrastructure for chargers around Europe.”

– Pekka Lundmark, President and CEO Fortum

“Iberdrola strongly supports actions towards a sustainable energy model. The campaign EV30@30 encourages the transition to an electric transport sector which, together with the increase in electricity coming from renewable energies, will contribute to fight against climate change, reduce pollution and increase energy efficiency. This will also produce social and economic benefits.”

– Ignacio S. Galán, Chairman and CEO of Iberdrola

“Vattenfall is a leading European energy company and to us the climate issue is central and strongly influences our strategic direction. Vattenfall’s goal is to enable a fossil free society and one important action we take is to build the largest charging network in North Western Europe and of course we are also electrifying our own car fleet. We hope this will inspire others to act and that we together can achieve the EV30@30 target.”

– Magnus Hall, President and CEO of Vattenfall

“With a large number of vehicles on the road registered to companies, we know business has an instrumental role to play in driving the transition to electric transport. The Climate Group’s EV100 initiative brings together leading companies choosing electric vehicles for their fleets and installing charging infrastructure at their premises by 2030. Governments and businesses must take action together, joining forces in a shared ambition for electric transport and sending a clear market signal to accelerate a roll-out of electric vehicles.”

– Helen Clarkson, CEO, The Climate Group

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Achieving Broadband Access for All in Africa Comes With a $100 Billion Price Tag

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Across Africa, where less than a third of the population has access to broadband connectivity, achieving universal, affordable, and good quality internet access by 2030 will require an investment of US $100 billion. This is according to a report launched at the Annual Meetings of the World Bank Group, which calls for urgent action to close the internet access gap while providing a roadmap to reach this ambitious goal.

The report from The Broadband for All Working Group  gives practical insights and suggestions of what is needed to attain this objective, including an action plan for universal broadband connectivity in Africa. To achieve universal broadband access, African countries will need to bring about 1.1 billion more people online. This will require exceptional and coordinated efforts from governments, the private sector, development partners, and civil society, the report says, but the investment is worth it.

The digital agenda is first and foremost a growth and jobs agenda,” says Makhtar Diop, the World Bank’s Vice President for Infrastructure. “The working-age population in Africa is expected to increase by some 450 million people between 2015 and 2035. If current trends continue, less than one quarter will find stable jobs. Broadening internet access means creating millions of job opportunities.”

While the number of broadband connections in Africa crossed the 400 million mark in 2018 (nearly twenty times 2010 levels), the regional average broadband penetration —including 3G and 4G connections— is only 25% in 2018. Mobile broadband coverage in Africa is still at 70% of the population. Even in North Africa, there is ample room for growth with 4G networks covering only about 60% of the population. Additional challenges, such as the lack of access to reliable and affordable electricity, make accelerating Africa’s digital transformation journey even more difficult.

According to the report, nearly 80% of all required investments are directly related to the need to roll out and maintain broadband networks. However, connecting the unconnected is about more than just infrastructure: about 20% of required investments consists in building the user skills and local content foundations, and another 2-4% should be allocated to setting up the appropriate regulatory framework, the report notes. While the private sector has driven most successful broadband initiatives, public agencies play a crucial role by implementing effective sector regulation, addressing potential market failures, and creating the conditions for an open, competitive broadband sector. 

“In large parts of Africa, we are witnessing a lack of progress in extending access and network coverage. Affordability is also declining in many nations. Promoting greater digital inclusion is going to require more effective and innovative collaboration,” said Doreen Bogdan-Martin, Executive Director of the Broadband Commission for Sustainable Development and Director of ITU’s Telecommunication Development Bureau. “We need to leverage our strengths and expertise. Governments can help with policies enabling new technologies, new business models and investment. The right policies will, in turn, provide the private sector with the incentives to build out infrastructure and explore new technologies and applications that will drive demand.”

Connecting the 100 million people in rural and remote areas that live out of reach of traditional cellular mobile networks will require strong private sector involvement, innovative business models, and alternative technologies, such as satellite and Wi-Fi based technical solutions, the report notes.

Let us be clear: no single actor will be able to meet Africa’s 2030 target and carry the burden of a $100 billion investment funding requirement alone. All stakeholders must work together to make sure that every African has affordable and reliable access to the internet”, says Hafez Ghanem, the World Bank’s Vice President for the Africa Region. This includes: the African Union and regional economic communities; African governments and respective public investment agencies; sector regulators; multilateral development banks and regional development banks; the United Nations and other development agencies; the private sector; and civil society groups and nongovernmental organizations.

* The Working Group on Broadband for All: A Digital Moonshot Infrastructure for Africa, led by the World Bank, was established in 2018 under the Broadband Commission for Sustainable Development with the primary objective of identifying investment requirements and policy roadmaps to increase connectivity and to reach full coverage in Africa. This report draws upon the expertise of Broadband Commissioners and experts from around the world.

About the Broadband Commission for Sustainable Development: ITU and UNESCO set up the Broadband Commission for Digital Development in 2010 with the aim of boosting the importance of broadband on the international policy agenda and expanding broadband access in every country as key to accelerating progress towards national and international development targets. Following adoption of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) in September 2015, the Commission was re-launched as the Broadband Commission for Sustainable Development to showcase and document the power of ICT and broadband-based technologies for sustainable development. Its members include top CEO and industry leaders, senior policy-makers and government representatives, international agencies, academia and organizations concerned with development.

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Medicine from the Sky: Telangana Hits Milestone for Drone Delivery of Medical Supplies

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The Government of Telangana has been exploring the use of drones to increase access to healthcare for communities across the state. Drones can dramatically cut transport times and increase supply chain efficiencies. Countries around the world have experimented with drones for last-mile delivery for the past five years, but the first big leap forward took place in Rwanda, where experiments, or pilot projects, matured into national-scale implementations. Through drones, Rwanda cut the delivery time of medical goods from four hours to fifteen minutes, in some cases, and saved thousands of lives in the process.

Now, Telangana is one step closer to actioning its own large-scale programme to deliver blood and transport of medical samples via drone. The Government has adopted a new framework to implement drones for last mile delivery. This will integrate them into the state’s healthcare supply chain. Co-designed with the World Economic Forum and Healthnet Global Limited, an Apollo Hospitals Group company, the framework will become the foundation for the pilot project to test drone delivery and eventually for an RFP.

“Drones are helping people in remote rural areas become connected to important services,” said Timothy Reuter, Head of Aerospace and Drones, World Economic Forum. “Adopting this framework brings Telangana one step closer to rolling out a system that could save lives. It outlines what challenges drones can solve, how to oversee operations and how to implement them. We are looking forward to the next steps of this project.”

“Apollo Hospitals Group company HealthNet Global Limited truly believes that use of Drones for transport of Organs and other Medical aid will contribute to saving many lives. We are happy working with the World Economic Forum and Government of Telangana, as a clinical partner in this drones project, which I am sure is the next step in our journey of remote healthcare delivery,” says Dr. Sangita Reddy, JMD Apollo Hospitals Group.

“Telangana has been a pioneer in using technology for improving the lives of the citizens. Using drones to deliver blood and other medical goods to people in remote and inaccessible areas is an exemplary project that demonstrates use of technology for the social good,” said K.T. Rama Rao, Minister for Information Technology and Electronics and Communication, Industries and Municipal Administration and Urban Development. This project that could save lives would serve as a reference model for other States in India.

The framework outlines the key factors in evaluating drone operations and the technical requirements for each use case. It will ensure government services are used as efficiently as possible and will serve as the starting point for discussions with civil aviation authorities.

This framework is part of the Drones and Tomorrow’s Airspace Portfolio, run out of the World Economic Forum Centre for the Fourth Industrial Revolution India. The Network brings together government, business, start-ups, international organizations and NGOs to co-design innovative policy solutions to accelerate the benefits of emerging technologies such as drones, artificial intelligence, internet of things, and blockchain while mitigating the risks. Pilot projects have already positively impacted the ecosystem of autonomous flight around the world. A first of its kind Performances Based Regulation (PBR) was published in Rwanda, testing the theory that by promoting a risk focused methodology to evaluating operations, instead of traditional prescriptive government mandates, new and socially important use cases can be enabled. Learn more in our Advanced Drone Operations Toolkit: Accelerating the Drone Revolution.

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With 50,000 Start-ups Registered, India Aims For As Many More By 2024

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“There are 50,000 registered start-ups in India, and there will be 50,000 more by 2024 at this pace,” said Guruprasad Mohapatra, Secretary at the Department for Promotion of Industry and Internal Trade of India. There has been tremendous attitudinal change among government departments, he said, speaking for himself as well as colleagues in different parts of government. He added that this change has been accelerated since 2015-16 when a new policy came into effect. Regulators and officials now see potential in start-ups, and are invested in boosting their size and number.

Indian start-ups have come into their own in the last four to five years, agreed Shailendra Singh, Managing Director, Sequoia Capital India, Singapore. The optimism, the ability to dream, the amount and quality of capital available, the sheer size and scale of start-ups, as well as their ambition and ability to execute globally, are remarkable. “It is exciting to back these companies that have both disrupted existing companies and become full-stack online and offline businesses themselves,” he said, “Technology is intrinsic to these companies, not only impacting them at a superficial level.”

Asian start-ups are significantly different from their counterparts in Silicon Valley, Singh said, where markets are deep and very large, and companies have the incentive to do one thing and do it very well. Companies also need not go outside. In Asia, on the other hand, there are “lots of white spaces” and individual markets are very small, so that companies can and must quickly mutate to related businesses. For instance, Indonesian start-up Gojek started as a bike rental service, and then branched out into logistics, payments, delivery, etc.

Sharing the experience of the fast-growing hospitality start-up, OYO, Aditya Ghosh, the company’s Chief Executive Officer said that OYO realized early on that the best way to create higher margins was to own the entire value chain end-to-end – operations, properties, customer experience and so on. It also grew a diversified portfolio with multiple brands offering hotel rooms, holiday homes, cloud kitchens and co-working spaces, resulting in an “omnichannel presence”.

What business needs from the government is investment in infrastructure and ecosystem, much of which relies on removing ground-level constraints, and providing light-touch but adequate regulation that ensures Indian companies enjoy credibility as they scale-up globally. It is essential for businesses to have regular and deep engagement with policy-makers so they can take steps to pre-empt a full-blown a crisis. They must also nurture and train talent to create innovative mindsets for the next wave of start-ups.

India must also overcome some systemic challenges, such as low participation of women in the workforce, said Ankiti Bose, Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Zilingo, Singapore, a four-year-old start-up that has brought technology and seamless connectivity to supply chains in the global clothing industry. With adequate data and regulatory support, Zilingo could “bring in capital at an unprecedented scale” to the fragmented, typically small apparel manufacturers and sellers in India, she said.

Mohapatra emphasized that the government is committed to improving women’s participation – by providing preferential access to capital to women-led start-ups, for instance – but the issue is of wider inclusion. “There are large tracts of India untouched by start-up presence,” he said, adding that the government is committed to spreading its start-up mission to the country’s more disadvantaged areas.

The government is committed to providing technology start-ups with room to experiment and develop without setting tight regulatory boundaries, as it did with the IT sector and the aviation sector earlier, he added.

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