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APEC Modernizes Anti-Corruption Controls

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Anti-corruption and law enforcement officials from the APEC member economies are recalibrating their efforts to safeguard businesses and livelihoods in the Asia-Pacific against wrongdoing.

Officials built momentum for innovative checks on bribery and corruption during policy consultations in Port Moresby, fleshing out preventative measures for the changing technological landscape and ways to fast track their adoption in the region.

“The challenge for our economies now is not necessarily how resilient we are to the effects of corruption,” explained Dr Lawrence Kalinoe OBE, Acting Secretary for Justice in Papua New Guinea’s Department of Justice and Attorney General. “The challenge is how resilient our systems are to prevent corruption.”

“We are stepping up coordination in APEC to facilitate newer, better ways to deter corrupt practices, not just react to them,” added Roselyn Gwaibo, Chair of the APEC Anti-Corruption and Transparency Working Group. “Our aim is to close conduits for abuse that impede vital services, harm the environment and undermine prosperity in each of our economies.”

The focus is on capturing and assessing data to improve transparency, the identification of conflicts of interest and preemption of misdeeds within government and the private sector. Examples range from online reporting of human resources, asset, travel and procurement information that is readily available to the public to secure whistleblowing channels.

“New mobile and digital technologies are making it easier than ever to collect, scrutinize and share information that could raise corruption red flags,” noted Claudia Ortega Forner of the Public Prosecutor’s Office in Chile.

“If there is cause for concern, the deployment of innovative disclosure mechanisms can increase the likelihood that it will be detected and addressed more quickly,” Ortega Forner continued. “Getting a handle on corruption before it unfolds is imperative to ensuring well-functioning institutions and re-building public trust in them.”

The progress of APEC’s push to optimize corruption controls could in turn significantly boost business conditions in the region, reducing transaction touch points and exchanges of cash that hinder efficiency, invite crimes of opportunity and elevate risk.

It is also turning attention in APEC to the need to keep pace with the increasing sophistication of fraud that may exploit the rise of innovations such as online payment systems, secure transaction records, or blockchain, and crypto currencies.

“Advances in digital data capture and automated transactional analysis can be powerful weapons in the fight against corruption, for example, in the early identification of money laundering and other illicit transactions put through the financial system,” said David Wilson, Chief Risk Officer of Australia New Zealand Banking Group in Papua New Guinea.

“When there is integrity in markets, it improves their attractiveness to business and that drives trade, investment, and promotes job creation and sustainable growth,” concluded Wilson. “Technology investment is important to the success of anti-corruption reforms. APEC is encouraged to look at opportunities where advances in technology can support these goals.”

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EU Facility for Refugees in Turkey: €5.6 bn out of €6 bn now allocated in support of refugees

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The European Commission today adopted a new set of assistance measures worth €1.41 billion, ensuring continued European Union support to refugees and host communities in Turkey. The programmes will focus on the areas of health, protection, socio-economic support and municipal infrastructure. The new measures are part of the second tranche of the Facility for Refugees in Turkey, bringing the total amount already allocated to €5.6 billion out of €6 billion since 2016, with the remaining balance due to be allocated over the summer.  

Johannes Hahn, Commissioner for European Neighbourhood Policy and Enlargement Negotiations, said: “With this new allocation of funds, the European Union continues to deliver on its commitment to support Turkey in hosting the largest group of refugees in the world. Our assistance will focus on healthcare and protection services to refugees, and increase the resilience and self-reliance of refugees and host communities through socio-economic support. In addition, we will support municipal infrastructure in provinces with a high number of refugees.”

The new assistance measures focus on long-term support and development assistance, as a combination of agreements with partners and relevant Turkish ministries. Contracts should be signed by end-2020 and actions should be completed by mid-2025 at the latest.

A particular feature of today’s financial allocation is that it aims to ensure the sustainability of Facility-funded activities, reflecting the need for sustainable support for refugee inclusion, self-reliance and integration beyond the EU Facility.

Background

The EU Facility for Refugees in Turkey was set up in 2015 in response to the European Council’s call for significant additional funding to support Syrian refugees in Turkey. It has a total budget of €6 billion divided into two equal tranches of €3 billion each. Out of the operational funds of €6 billion, over €2.35 billion has already been disbursed, €3.5 billion contracted and €5.6 billion allocated, with over 80 projects already rolled out.

The Facility provides for a joint coordination mechanism of EU budget and Member States’ contributions designed to ensure that the needs of refugees and host communities are being addressed in a comprehensive and coordinated manner. The support seeks to improve conditions for refugees in Turkey as part of the EU’s comprehensive approach to addressing the refugee crisis inside and outside the EU.

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Human Rights

ICJ orders Pakistan to review death penalty for Indian accused of spying

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In a ruling delivered on Wednesday, the International Court of Justice (ICJ) ordered Pakistan to review a death sentence handed down in the case of a former Indian Navy officer accused by Pakistan of spying, finding that the country’s authorities acted in breach of the Vienna Convention, which lays out rules for diplomatic relations between countries.

Kulbhushan Jadhav, said the Court, had not been informed of his rights by the Pakistani authorities, and that the Indian Government has been deprived of “consular access”: the right to communicate with him.

During the hearings, the ICJ had directed Pakistan not to carry out the death sentence until the Court’s final ruling. On Wednesday, the Court ordered a “continued stay of execution”, as a “indispensable condition for the effective review and reconsideration of the conviction and sentence”.

Mr. Jadhav was arrested three years ago by Pakistani authorities, who say that he was in the restive Balochistan province, which is home to a separatist insurgency that Pakistan accuses India of backing. The charges levelled against Mr. Jadhav were of “espionage and sabotage activities against Pakistan”.

Although a video was released shortly after Mr. Jadhav’s arrest, in which he was shown admitting involvement in spying, India has always questioned the alleged confession, saying that it was extracted under duress. The Indian authorities also deny that Jadhav is a spy and say that he was kidnapped in Iran, which borders the province, which he was visiting on business.

Following Pakistan’s pronouncement of the death penalty, in April 2017, India filed a case with the ICJ, calling the trial, which took place in a military court, “farcical”, and asked for a stay of execution and consular access to Mr. Jadhav. Pakistan countered that Mr. Jadhav was not given consular access because he is a spy who illegally entered the country in order to create “unrest and instability”.

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WEF on Africa to Focus on Inclusiveness in the Fourth Industrial Revolution

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The 28th World Economic Forum on Africa will take place in Cape Town, South Africa, on 4-6 September. The theme of the meeting is Shaping Inclusive Growth and Shared Futures in the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

The meeting will be the first that the World Economic Forum has held in sub-Saharan Africa since 2017, when leaders from government, business and civil society from around the world gathered in Durban, South Africa.

This year’s meeting falls in a year when 20 elections will take place across the region, and nearly 100 days since South African President Cyril Ramaphosa took office. While progress has been made politically in sub-Saharan Africa, economic growth is also expected to accelerate modestly in 2019 from 3.1% in 2018 to an average of 3.6% in 2019, according to the World Bank.

Against this backdrop, the World Economic Forum on Africa will address a number of key issues facing the region’s inclusive development. These include:

· Supporting growth and integration through the African Continental Free Trade Area

· Creating high-quality employment opportunities and protecting workers in the Fourth Industrial Revolution

· Employing drones to address health, infrastructure and other societal needs

· Using emerging technologies to advance healthcare and prepare for epidemics

· Implementing growth strategies that address environmental challenges and deliver industrialization

The Co-Chairs of the meeting are:

· Ellen Agler, Chief Executive Officer, The END Fund, USA

· Jeremy Farrar, Director, Wellcome Trust, United Kingdom

· Arancha Gonzalez Laya, Executive Director, International Trade Centre (ITC), Geneva

· André Hoffmann, Vice-Chairman, Roche, Switzerland

· Alex Liu, Managing Partner and Chairman, A.T. Kearney, USA

· Jim Ovia, Chairman, Zenith Bank, Nigeria

· Sipho M Pityana, Chairman, AngloGold Ashanti, South Africa

“Africa’s successful development depends on building the right conditions for its new generation of entrepreneurs, innovators and leaders. This means smart, agile institutions; an enabling environment for innovation that includes access to skills and capital; and a determined approach by policy-makers to level the playing field and implement policies that prioritize sustainable, inclusive growth over short-term imperatives,” said Elsie Kanza, Head of the Regional Agenda, Africa, and Member of the Executive Committee at the World Economic Forum.

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