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Nearly every child in war-torn Yemen now needs humanitarian aid

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As the brutal conflict in Yemen nears its grim third anniversary, malnutrition and disease are running rampant in the country and virtually every child there is dependent on humanitarian aid to survive, the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) said on Tuesday.

“An entire generation of children in Yemen is growing up knowing nothing but violence,” said Meritxell Relano, the head of UNICEF operations in the war-torn country, underlining the gravity of the crisis.

“Malnutrition and disease are rampant as basic services collapse. Those who survive are likely to carry the physical and psychological scars of conflict for the rest of their lives,” she stated.

Since the escalation of violence in March 2015, when conflict broke out between forces loyal to President Abdrabbuh Mansour Hadi and those allied to the Houthi rebel movement, Yemen, already the poorest in the region, has been left on the verge of a humanitarian collapse.

Hospitals, medical facilities as well as water and sanitation systems have been rendered inoperable across large parts of the country, and humanitarian assistance is the lifeline for over three-fourths of the country’s population.

Born into War

This dire situation in Yemen, has perhaps had the worst impact on the three million children born in country since the conflict erupted.

In its latest report, Born into War – 1,000 Days of Lost Childhood, UNICEF notes that 30 per cent of that number were born premature, another 30 percent had low birth weight and 25,000 died at birth or within the first month of life.

Furthermore, more than half of all children in Yemen lack access to safe drinking water or adequate sanitation, children-under-five represent over a quarter of all cases of cholera and acute watery diarrhoea. An additional 1.8 million children are estimated to be acutely malnourished, including nearly 400,000 severe acutely malnourished children “fighting for their lives” adds the report.

The report calls on all parties to the conflict, those with influence on them and the global community to prioritize the protection of children in Yemen by putting an immediate end to violence and reaching a peaceful political solution.

It also calls for sustainable and unconditional humanitarian across the country and lifting of restrictions on imports of goods into Yemen as well as for sustained and sufficient funding for aid programmes.

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Africa Today

UN’s top envoy warns Great Lakes Region is ‘at a crossroads’

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Speaking at a Security Council meeting on the situation in Africa’s Great Lakes region on Wednesday, the Secretary-General’s Special Envoy, Huang Xia, told ambassadors that the countries concerned now stand “at a crossroads”.  

For Mr. Xia, the main threat to peace and stability in this region around the Great Rift Valley, remains the persistence of non-State armed groups. 

He pointed to “an upsurge in attacks”, whether by the Allied Democratic Forces (ADF) in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), or those launched by the RED-Tabara against Bujumbura airport, in Burundi, last September. 

Since the beginning of this year, in DRC alone, at least 1,043 civilians have been killed, including 233 women and 52 children. 

“This violence continues to have serious consequences on the already fragile humanitarian situation, as well as on the socio-economic stability of the affected area”, the Special Envoy said.  

He told the Council Members that “these negative forces also remain involved in the illicit exploitation and trade in natural resources, the revenues of which finance their arms procurement and recruitment.” 

Solutions 

“How to put an end to it?”, he asked. “This is obviously an old question that haunts anyone interested in the region.” 

Despite the challenges, he highlighted several bilateral and regional initiatives, saying they “attest to the emergence of a community aware of the added value of dialogue and cooperation.” 

He also noted the overall peaceful transfers of power in the DRC and Burundi, as well as the signing and implementation of peace agreements in the Central African Republic, South Sudan and the Sudan.  

For him, more than ever, “it is necessary to sustainably consolidate these achievements while firmly addressing the challenges that persist.” 

“The success of such an approach requires learning from the lessons of the past and showing imagination to support the people of the Great Lakes region in building a better present and future”, he added. 

Turning to COVID-19, he said the pandemic has exacerbated vulnerabilities, but also demonstrated the resilience of the region.  

Before the pandemic, 15 million people across the Great Lakes were already displaced from their homes, facing rising malnutrition and food insecurity.  

Mr. Xia also reiterated the Secretary-General’s call for greater solidarity to facilitate access to vaccines and to strengthen health systems.  

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), to date, only 36 million doses of the vaccine have been administered in a region of nearly 450 million people. 

UN presence 

Martha Ama Akyaa Pobee, the Assistant Secretary-General for Africa in the Departments of Political and Peacebuilding Affairs and Peace Operations, also briefed Council Members. 

Ms. Pobee informed that the UN is reconfiguring its presence in the region to best address the challenges, highlighting a few areas where the Council’s support is most needed.   

For her, the situation requires “a comprehensive approach rooted in enhanced political engagement, encompassing military and non-military interventions, fostering economic cooperation across the borders and building trust between neighbours and among communities.” 

She also argued that “armed group activity is a symptom of insecurity in the region”, and therefore “the enabling conditions should be addressed upstream.” 

Among those main root causes, she pointed out the illegal exploitation and regional trafficking of natural resources, saying it contributes to the financing of armed group networks but also “creates parallel economy at the expense of States’ budgets whose revenues continue to diminish.” 

The Executive Secretary of the International Conference on the Great Lakes Region (ICGLR), João Caholo, and a civil society representative also briefed the Council. 

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What Is A Mac Data Recovery Software & How Does It Work

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With the advent of technology, data storage remains a crucial element of business and communication. Whether using a Windows PC, Android, or macOS, you need versatile software to secure your data. If you continuously use MacOS, you need good Mac data recovery software.

Of course, most people still use some of the simplest ways to free up space by finding and deleting files and folders that are no longer needed. Whether these files were downloaded or shared to your MacBook, deleting them to create more space is a straightforward process. However, it is better not to fret, as recovering files that have been accidentally deleted is equally simple and easy.

There are several good data recovery software you can install and use to recover files and folders. You can easily use this software to recover deleted files on Mac, including finding and removing duplicate files, clearing temporary files, and emptying all the trash cans. 

In this article, we focus on explaining more about Mac data recovery software and how they work. The article will help you better understand Mac data recovery software, how they work, and how to choose the best to use with your system.

Mac Data Recovery Software

The best data recovery software for Mac will help you:

  • Recover data from crashed or non-booting Mac
  • Recover deleted documents, emails, videos, audios, and photos
  • Protect macOS Big Sur and lower versions
  • Support data recovery from USB corruption, unrecognized drives, and partition loss

Let’s look at one of the best data recovery software for Mac – Disk Drill for Mac.

Disk Drill For Mac

Disk Drill, developed by Cleverfiles, is the free data software for Mac OS X. in addition to having previewing capabilities for recovered files and folders, Disk Drill Basic contains several other functionalities such as Guaranteed Recovery and Recovery Vault, boot disk maker, lost partition restoration and so on. This makes Disk Drill one of the best Mac data recovery software to use. 

Also, the software works on both internal and external hard drives, SD cards, USB flash drives, and many other external appliances that you can connect to your Mac.

The latest version of the software has an extensive database of file signatures that can be recovered from drives even when your devices are formatted. Besides, the software uses very efficient and quick scanning algorithms.

If you are using macOS and think that this software may become obsolete after some usage time, you are wrong. Disk Drill Data Recovery for Mac is constantly updated and supported by committed teams to cover all the cases of data corruption that may result from the loss of power, improper removal of a device, etc. Below are some of the main features that make Disk Drill a top data recovery software for Mac:

  • Guarantee Recovery is a background service that saves a copy of each file to a user-specific folder. Both the data protection modules significantly reduce the chances of permanently losing critical data. 
  • Recovery Vault provides an extra layer to the Mac trash bin that references the deleted files on Mac. The data recovery feature provides the ability to recover lost data from a byte-to-byte cone version of the device and even partitions without risking the original storage source. 
  • Other available tools for free include Disk Health Monitor, Time Machine Recovery, Emergency Recovery Boot Drive, Duplicate File Finder, and Mac Cleaner.

Disk Drill, therefore successfully manages the balance between essential features for casual users and those advanced features required by professional and enterprise users. 

How Does It work?

1.      Clean Up Your Mac 

The apps help you get rid of temporary files, uninstall unwanted applications, clean up additional languages, delete big files stored in the mail, among other locations. 

Disk Drill has significant features of cleaning applications and will help you get rid of duplicate files too quickly. 

2.      Find And Remove Duplicate Files

Disk Drill helps you by quickly finding and removing duplicate data on your Mac. 

3.      Empty The Trash Cans

Emptying the trash cans is the other way to empty or clean up space on Mac. Usually, when you delete files, they are sent to the trash can for storage so that you can easily recover them. 

4.      Uninstall Applications 

You may have installed several apps in the Mac that you no longer use. Such apps take up much space on your device, and you can remove them with Disk Drill to free up space. 

5.      Clean Out Temporary Files

Many people still retain files they have used in their MacBook. Such files will be taking up your disk space without adding any value. Cleaning the temporary files is an excellent way to free up some space for more important files. 

Other Mac Data Recovery Software To Consider

Apart from Disk Drill, other software that is also considered among the best recovery apps on Mac include:

  1. PhotoRec For Mac
  2. EaseUS Data Recovery Wizard for Mac
  3. MiniTool Power Data Recovery for Mac
  4. Softtote Mac Data Recovery 

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Africa Today

African Union urged to address the threat of Congo forest logging driving extreme weather

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Industrial logging in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) may severely disturb rainfall patterns across sub-Saharan Africa and bring about more extreme weather, including intense droughts and flash floods. In a letter sent today to the African Union, Greenpeace Africa is calling for an urgent discussion of the consequences that plans made in Kinshasa to lift its moratorium on logging would have for Congolese and African people in general. 

Renewed industrial logging in the DRC poses a risk “to Indigenous People, local communities and biodiversity, as well as the whole of sub-Saharan Africa,” writes Greenpeace Africa’s Programme Director, Melita Steele, to the Commissioner for Rural Economy and Agriculture, H.E. Josefa Leonel Correia Sacko, 

Africa’s climate is fundamentally linked to the state of Central Africa’s forests and massive logging can impact the quantity of rainfall throughout the region. The Congo Basin forest is estimated to contribute more than half of the annual precipitation in Sub-Saharan Africa, already facing a plethora of droughts and extreme heat waves.

Last July, Congolese Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Environment, Ève Bazaiba, decided to lift the moratorium on new logging concessions, which has been in place since 2002. The decision was approved on 9 July by the eleventh Council of Ministers, presided by Président Félix Tshisekedi. An implementation decree is believed to be imminent. 

“Deciding on whether to protect or destroy the rainforest may be within the DRC’s sovereignty, but the consequences of its actions will be felt everywhere from Nairobi to Dakar, from Pretoria to Abjua,” writes Steele on behalf of Greenpeace Africa. 

Beyond direct implications for Congolese and other African people, the decision to lift the moratorium is contradicting commitments made by the President of the Republic, Felix Tshisekedi, at President Joe Biden’s Leaders Summit on Climate, to protect the forest and increase forest cover by 8%. It also undermines the African Union’s 2063 Agenda and its Sustainable Forest Management Framework (SFMF), promising that “Africa will have zero deforestation and forest degradation and its forests will be protected, sustainably managed and restored through collaborative, cross-sectoral and transformative efforts to ensure the prosperity, food security and resilience of its people.” 

Finally, this jeopardizes Africa’s credibility in climate talks in COP26, set to begin in Glasgow in ten days, and the appeal from rich nations to support vulnerable nations annually with USD 100 billion to face the climate crisis. 

Serge Ngwato, Greenpeace Africa forest campaigner in Kinshasa: “We cannot expect Africa’s claim for climate funds to be taken seriously, when our own actions make the climate crisis worse. Renewing industrial logging would pose additional risk both to us Congolese and to our neighbours – the moratorium must be extended, while management rights over the forest must be granted to its Indigenous and local communities.” 

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