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Green Planet

The Last call for Humans

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An Extinction Level Event is a likely Event that will cause the extinction of the human race. Various Hollywood movies have depicted the different types of ELEs and how they came about. Extinction by viruses, zombies, nuclear winter, computer malware, aliens, solar flares, asteroids, climate change has all been depicted on the silver screen, mostly in a gory and ghastly fashion.

The cinematic fashion in which some of the topics were handled made the word ELE, a figment of the writers’ imagination and hammered into the general populace a Rambo-like image of the humankind which will survive and stand tall, no matter what will come their way. We have come to believe that no matter what happens, Humanity will survive and grow in face of all adversity. We have never been more wrong.

With the advent of the 21st century, a major Extinction Level Event (ELE) that have arisen before the humankind is that of the Environmental Pollution. Unlike other ELEs, this one is of our own making and we know of its coming. The seeds of the destruction were sown way back when the first human was born. Back then, the population of humans was less, their technology unsophisticated and their ecological footprint too small. Nature was able to sustain the Chopping down of a few trees, hunting a few animals and burning some easily available fuel. The first step in controlling environmental pollution is the dispersion, followed by degrading action and decomposition after which it is status quo. Since the after-effects were small, it was easy for dispersion and decomposition. It was with the population explosion of the industrial age and the advent of the era of coal that we started to do some serious damage to the environment. Cities with the booming population like Paris and London which generated a tremendous amount of pollutants and become cesspits of filth and diseases. Forests were leveled to provide for fuel and wetlands were drained to settle cities and provide for agricultural land. Guns made it possible for humans to hunt even the biggest of the animals and man became the apex predator. Then came the era of fossil fuels and we hammered a final nail in our coffins. Cars powered by fossil fuels made transportation easier, allowing for larger cities with more suburbs, which turn required more land and led to concretization of the land. Burning fossil fuels generated, even more, air pollutants than the chimneys of coal did. Advanced ships allowed humans to reach greater depths in the oceans and disturb their sanctity too. Waste management technology evolved but so did the amount of waste and population skyrocketed. Polythene appeared and has now clogged most of our river bodies and is starting to accumulate in the oceans too. Worst of all, Plastics are non-biodegradable and will now remain in the environment for very long. The amount of pollutants which we emit every day is mind-boggling and more so is the environmental degradation committed by us. Forests are being leveled, the soil is being eroded, pollutants are being introduced in the system, water is being contaminated and land is being layered with concrete. Species are being exterminated at an alarming rate and there is a lot of ignorance among the scientists and policymakers on the same. Most think that reducing the rate of pollution can heal the Nature. Others believe that improving standards for emissions will be of some use. No way, the amount of pollutants in the environment is just too much and it will take hundreds, if not thousands of years for the Earth to revert back to its pre-industrial age state. These steps can only slow the damage, not stop it entirely.

Most scientists and policymakers combine Global Warming and Environmental Pollution in one. This is correct to a certain extent. Pollutants like Carbon dioxide, methane, and water vapor increase the greenhouse effect leading to global warming. The global warming is disrupting weather patterns, agricultural practices and increasing the rate of glacial meltdown. This can lead to massive food and water shortfalls “in the future”. Global warming and its effects have been debated and discussed several times and several facts and data in its favor are not yet verified. Global warming is a major crowd puller for the Hollywood. Movies like Waterworld, Day after Tomorrow and several documentaries have earned a lot of cash and won many accolades.

On the other hand, Environmental Pollution comprises of the entire gamut of ecologically degrading effects of humans. The effects of environmental pollution have already started to show on the humankind. Large increases in the instances of lung cancers, eye problems, hearing losses, premature weakening, high fatigue, severe skeletal problems have been observed in the humans while declining productivity, the change in behavioral patterns, low fertility and mutation has already appeared in the flora and fauna. The effects are causing real losses to the global economy and are a major challenge for heavily polluted countries like India and China, the powerhouses of global growth. There is no debate on the ill effects of the pollution on us. The results are before our eyes, in our bodies and on the beds of hospitals. Unlike Global Warming, Environmental Pollution is yet to have a major movie title based on it. For a problem of its magnitude, awareness in the general populace is shockingly low. Most school children and even many adults are unable to quantify Environmental Pollution and Global Warming and mostly, think of the two as the same.

In simple terms, Earth can no longer sustain the number of people living this ecologically degrading type of lifestyle anymore. It is not the time of shortcuts or quick fixes. The truth is Environmental pollution is an incurable disease and with its effects evident and multiplying by every passing day. It can only be prevented by a grand scale overhaul of us all if we are to survive and not be relegated to the pages of history. Environmental pollution is a ticking time-bomb and we must hope that we may have not yet passed the point of no return.

Green Planet

You never miss the water, till the well runs dry

Asad Ullah

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In the past twenty years, virtually every country around the world has experienced natural calamities if we have experienced it in the form of drought, famine, immense downpours,  and snowfall – in the same vein the world experienced it in the way of wildfire, Tsunami, hurricanes, flood, volcanic eruptions, earthquakes and pandemic ailments. The question is, who is accountable for all the calamities and who will pay the price? Nevertheless, it is hard to deny that human civilization is having profound effects on our planet, and very few places persisted unharmed.

This article gives a minor insight into reality, stressing that climate change is not only a threat to water availability or food scarcity but also a significant threat to biodiversity and all the major causes of environmental disasters. The above problems are coupled with one single problem “the rise in global temperature.” Since the dawn of industrialization, the average global temperature increases gradually – no serious step has been taken to tackle the problem.

As the sun’s rays reach the earth’s surface, most are absorbed and re-emitted as heat. Greenhouses gasses such as water vapors and carbon dioxide absorb and re-radiate some of this heat; an increased number of greenhouses gases in the atmosphere mean more heat is trapped – warming the earth. The continued burning of fossil fuels like gas and coal, as well as other anthropogenic activities, have increased the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere by 45% since the industrial revolution. As a consequence of the human egoistic actions, the global average surface temperature has raised by 0.8OC over that time. However, it is not just a number we should worry about; the costs of the rising temperature is already being felt here and now.

In current 0.8OC rise in temperature, further changes to the climate in recent times can be seen in the warming of the ocean, a rise in sea level, immense heatstroke, decreasing ice sheet and snow in the northern hemisphere as well as a decline in the sea ice in the Arctic. In the coming future, if the emission continues unimpeded, then further warming of 2.6OC to 4.8OC is predictable by the end of this century. Nonetheless, at the low end, this would have a serious implication on human societies and other natural habitats.

Like other greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide is a dynamic gas in global warming. When a considerable amount of carbon dioxide gas is released to the atmosphere, it acts like a blanket preventing the heat from absconding, which comes back to the earth with no place to escape, further intensifying the average temperature. As per the world, average temperature rise, ice sheets, and glacier melt and the sea level expand, which disrupts the coastal communities, infrastructure, and small lands nearby sea.

Climate change also making weather more extremely hot or cold, and further, sever warmer weather and ocean produce a considerable number of hurricanes as well as torrential downpour and wind. In drier areas, global warming is linked with wildfire, drought, amidst all the wildfire has experienced very recently in many countries around the world.

Remarks: In the past years, most of the countries around the globe have witnessed record-breaking changes in the weather; in the same vein, thousands of agreements have been signed by the states to reduce carbon emission; nevertheless, all deals are nothing more than words on pages. The question is, who will make those words a reality. Despite a large number of the accords, none of the agreements came into a function; lack of seriousness is the leading cause. In such circumstances, combine efforts are essential; it is also the concern of the United Nations to push those countries which emit a high amount of greenhouse gases.

The Paris agreement on climate change means working with UN member states to reduce the number of carbon emission by 1.5%, which indeed is the only choice to contest climate change. Since the Paris accord, global banks have invested $1.9 trillion in fossil fuels. The world’s top 100 productive industries are responsible for 70% of global carbon emissions; the G20 countries account for 80% of global carbon emissions; the wealthiest 10% of the world’s population produces half of the carbon emissions while the poorest 50% is account for just 1/10. Indeed, overcoming climate change need mighty force, but some must pay more than others.

Recently a handful of rich countries pledged to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases by so and so % or to become fully climate neutral by this or that date, and nothing has been achieved in the past four years since the accord came into power. The G20 countries are accountable for climate change, and they must take serious action to mitigate or at least lessen the impacts of natural calamities. Instead of signing agreements to satisfy the world, a gravity in their accords is utmost besides with their substantial contribution and thoughtfulness; the global emission may perhaps remain below 1.5%, every friction in the degree matter and even a 1% rise in the global average temperature is detrimental to the ecosystem.

It is now the right time to think and act, spread awareness among people, take deliberate actions, discrete climate changes from politics, and ultimately stop the burning of fossil fuel and re-make this world a green-clean place for living. If we fail to overcome climate change, the world must prepare for long-term everlasting disasters; immense heat-waves, the rise of sea level, acidification of seawater, pure water scarcity, pandemic diseases, wildfire, the extinction of vital species as well as the disruption in food cycle which will, directly and indirectly, disturb the living life.

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Green Planet

A World in Distress

Dr. Arshad M. Khan

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World mean temperature is up 1.1C since the industrial revolution.  Climate experts believe we have 12 years before it rises enough to set up a self-reinforcing cycle, meaning trouble.  All the same, Trump and Brazil’s Bolsonaro remain in denial when climate scientists have already shown human agency and the facts are measurable.

Australia’s mean temperature is up 1.5C since 1910.  It has had prolonged severe drought causing vegetation to lose moisture and become fuel for a fire lit accidentally by lightning or careless human activity.  The bush fires raging in New South Wales are one result.  Thousands of homes have been lost despite the valiant efforts of overstretched firefighters, and some have even made the ultimate sacrifice.

The air is difficult to breathe even in the neighboring state of Victoria where the Australian Tennis Open is being held in Melbourne.  Players affected have been forced to withdraw.

Human agency and the effects of key gas emissions have been proven by scientists and the longer nothing is done, the more difficult, even drastic, the solution.  The UN Panel on Climate Change offered a prescription in 2018 to keep temperature rise in the future below danger levels.  But implementation is another problem altogether stymied by the rich and powerful nations.  

The Panel’s COP25 talks in Madrid last month ended more or less in failure though that word is seldom used.  Major fossil fuel producers, principally Saudi Arabia and the US, managed to thwart the rest of the world.  In the final agreement, all countries are required merely to decide their pledges for COP25 in Glasgow this November.  They do actually nothing to abate climate change.

Ironically, Australia with its right-wing government was a key supporter of the US, and Scott Morrison the prime minister is possibly the least welcome man in New South Wales, one community telling him point blank he was not wanted when he tried to visit.  And the uncontrollable bush fires keep burning, continually exhausting firefighters in their efforts to abate them.

So where do we stand before the Glasgow COP26 meeting in November?  Current policies will lead to an estimated 3C rise above preindustrial levels.  As a point of reference, we are currently at 1.1C above and 1.5C begins troublesome coastal flooding.  Current pledges will give us a 2.5 – 2.8C rise, still far from necessary for a comfortable livable planet.

Firm action is required, and thus the push for more ambitious pledges before COP26.  World leaders have also been invited to Kunming in China for a major conference on safeguarding nature as more and more species become extinct.  A month before COP26 it should reinforce the importance of reducing global warming.

The task ahead is clear.  The earth needs a halving of emissions from vehicles, power stations, industry and agriculture; instead, CO2 levels are still rising.  We can only hope the working groups meeting in preparation can push through what is necessary for success at the Fall conference.

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Green Planet

Larry Fink’s letter to CEOs: Climate change finance goes mainstream, finally

Iveta Cherneva

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My jaw dropped when on Tuesday I saw BlackRock’s Chairman and CEO Larry Fink’s letter to CEOs, which he issues every year ahead of Davos to chart the finance and investment trends ahead.

BlackRock is now placing climate change at the center of its strategy. This could as well be the climate change news of the decade. With its close to USD 7 trillion in assets under management, BlackRock is the largest asset manager in the world. 

The tide is turning. For the past 10-15 years, all of us in the UN and sustainability field were trying to move climate change finance mainstream. Ten years ago, when I was at the UN environmental agency, the efforts by me and hundreds of others were significant, but change was incremental. Yes, there were joint investor statements on climate change but they were mostly calling on governments to create the incentives for the finance industry to do the switch rather than pledging investors’ own commitments. Building the “business case for sustainable finance” had its financial arguments but few followers.

Things have changed. Greta Thunberg did what hundreds of us couldn’t do for a decade. Climate change is the number one issue now and you hear about it everywhere. 

We will be looking forward to Greta’s call at Davos to end the coal industry, as unrealistic as the proposition might sound to many. Greta should be pitted against Donald Trump in a Davos duel to corner publicly the US President. That would be the debate of the year — and the US presidential election debates have not even started. It is in the DNA of the World Economic Forum to keep top VIPs as comfortable as possible, so that premier league match on climate change will not happen. But we have BlackRock’s news.

Change has come. We now see the day in which the largest global asset manager sounds like an environmental activist. I will open a beer and cheer to Larry Fink.

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