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There is no alternative to the EAEU in the Eurasian space

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“The EAEU is a natural living space for citizens of the Union countries. Our goal is to create favourable conditions for them and the business community. This means elimination of barriers, restrictions so people, capital, goods and services can move freely,” the Chairman of the Board of the Eurasian Economic Commission (EEC), Tigran Sargsyan, said speaking at the 12th International.

Conference on Eurasian Economic Integration held by the EDB.

According to Tigran Sargsyan, this can be achieved through institutional reforms focused on the future. “Digital transformation, in particular, is an obvious global trend, and if we are behind here, we will face new barriers, exemptions and restrictions,” the Chairman of the EEC Board believes.

When evaluating the efficiency of the ongoing integration processes, Tigran Sargsyan highlighted the fact that the Eurasian Economic Commission had been created precisely in order to ensure harmonization of those changes that were supposed to happen in all the countries of the Union in the course of transition to common markets for goods, services, capital and labour. “We have to reflect the interests of all the five member countries,” the Chairman of the EEC Board believes. To this end, the Commission continues to work on the formation of unified customs rules, development of common technical regulations, phytosanitary and veterinary requirements. Today, in any way about 50% of the EEC activities are related to the removal of barriers, exemptions, restrictions. “Creation of the ” White Book”, where we tried to not simply describe these barriers, but also to find an agreed stance of the countries to eliminate them, can be considered a big breakthrough for this year,” the Chairman of the EEC Board is convinced.

“At the same time, we have always to rethink the process of integration,” Tigran Sargsyan said. “Today, the actual task is the expansion of powers and thus the increase of the level of the Commission liability. Expanding the scope of liability of a supranational body means paying attention to the common interests.”
“If we created a supranational body that reflects the interests of all the parties, it should work. Therefore, it is necessary to expand powers. Thus, the Commission liability for the common future will be more evident. And from this point of view, experience of the European Union is useful, as we are perhaps the second economic association in the world practice with such a deep integration and a supranational body,” the Chairman of the EEC Board emphasised.

The Commission’s position was supported by all participants at the plenary session. In particular, the Chairman of the Board of the Centre for Strategic Research, Alexey Kudrin, noted the need to strengthen the role of supranational institutions. In particular, he stated that “Russia should in fact to bolder delegate their sovereign rights to this level, to abandon some of its autonomy and national egoism.
 
According to the Chairman of the EDB Executive Board, Dmitry Pankin, to accelerate the integration processes and the growth of the economies of the Union countries we must continue eliminating barriers within the EAEU, developing economic cooperation with third countries and simplifying the entering foreign markets by companies. In addition, Dmitry Pankin stressed the importance of an agreed transport policy in implementing large infrastructure projects. “One of the key elements that will link the economies of our countries is just common infrastructure. The EEC began an important and useful work on the analysis of transport projects that every country is going to develop. Now, more than 30 major projects have already been collected. I find the task of infrastructure project integration to be extremely important,” Dmitry Pankin noted.

According to the Chairman of the EEC Board, Tigran Sargsyan, “the future of the integration processes largely depends on whether the countries of the Union can jointly respond to global challenges.” Only together, in one integration association, we can be successful and find our place among the world leaders. This will raise the level of well-being of citizens and ensure the competitiveness of the Eurasian business, Tigran Sargsyan is sure.

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Environment

Are Nature Based Solutions the key to Africa’s climate response?

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While the UN climate talks are celebrating their 25th year, carbon emissions around the world have continued to climb. For many, that is where natural solutions could play a key role in managing a dramatic climate transition.

Nature-based solutions or the process of working with and around natural ecosystems to deliver real-world benefits for climate resilience and sustainable development, took center stage on day 4 of COP25 in Madrid).

The African Development Bank has three main approaches to nature-based solutions; namely, restoring damaged ecosystems (land, forests and water bodies), conserving biodiversity, and integrated natural resources management.

Vanessa Ushie, Manager of the Policy Analysis Division at the Bank’s African Natural Resource Centre, briefed delegates at COP 25 about the Centre’s work during a panel discussion on Tuesday.

“Nature-based solutions are easy to use, and very effective in improving community livelihoods and resilience to climate change. The AfDB is scaling up the use of nature-based solutions to address climate impacts on critical ecosystems and biodiversity in Africa,” Ushie said.

UN biodiversity expert Valerie Kapos described a range of natural solutions being implemented across Africa, and around the world. These included protecting rivers, forests, and marine solutions, to benefit local economies.

“We need to be applying that argument to whichever solutions we are choosing,” said Kapos, Head of Climate Change and Biodiversity at the UN Environment Programme World Conservation Monitoring Centre (UNEP-WCMC).

This is definitely true for the Seychelles, which has been appointed by the African Union to be the champion of the blue or ocean economy across the continent. While the continent is known for its deserts and jungles, a blue economic transition will be essential for the 48 coastal states that collectively make up the world’s longest coastline.

“We have protected 47% of our land, and are moving toward 50%. But our ocean territory is 3,000 times bigger than our land territory, and we are on track to protect 30% of that area,” said Ronald Jumeau, Permanent Representative of the Seychelles at the UN.

This was made possible by one of the world’s biggest debt-swap programs. The debt-for-nature deal was made possible through The Nature Conservancy, which bought the island nation’s $400 million sovereign debt at a discount. That money will be re-invested in nature conservation programmes.

“Through this program we have funded mangrove restoration and climate education programmes,” said Angelique Pouponneau, who runs a Seychelles-based trust fund focusing on climate adaptation and conservation.

Ushie from the African Development Bank pointed out that “one thing we are looking at is changing the way in which lending is being channeled to Africa, and how nature can be integrated in the measurement of national wealth and sovereign credit ratings for African countries.”

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EU Politics

Aviation Safety: EU Commission adopts new EU Air Safety List

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The European Commission today updated the EU Air Safety List, the list of airlines that do not meet international safety standards, and are therefore subject to an operating ban or operational restrictions within the European Union. The EU Air Safety List seeks to ensure the highest level of air safety for Europeans and all other passengers travelling in the European Union.

There is positive news for Gabon as all airlines certified in Gabon have been released from the list following improvements to the aviation safety situation in that country. However, the Armenian Civil Aviation Committee has been put under heightened scrutiny because of signs of a decrease in safety oversight.

Commissioner for Transport Adina Vălean said: “Today’s decision illustrates our continuous efforts to offer the highest level of safety. Not only to European travellers, but to travellers worldwide, because aviation safety knows no border or nationalities. I am pleased to announce that the European Commission was able today to clear all Gabonese air carriers from the EU Air Safety List. Gabon was on the List already since 2008, so it is very good that we can recognise the efforts the aviation safety authorities in Gabon have made.”

The EU Air Safety List not only helps to maintain high levels of safety in the EU, but also helps affected airlines and countries to improve their levels of safety, in order for them to eventually be taken off the list. In addition, the EU Air Safety List has become a major preventive tool, as it motivates countries with safety problems to act upon them before a ban under the EU Air Safety List would become necessary.

Following today’s update, a total of 115 airlines are banned from EU skies:

  • 109 airlines certified in 15 states, due to a lack of safety oversight by the aviation authorities from these states;
  • Six individual airlines, based on safety concerns with regard to these airlines themselves: Avior Airlines (Venezuela), Iran Aseman Airlines (Iran), Iraqi Airways (Iraq), Blue Wing Airlines (Suriname), Med-View Airlines (Nigeria) and Air Zimbabwe (Zimbabwe).

An additional three airlines are subject to operational restrictions and can only fly to the EU with specific aircraft types: Air Koryo (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea), Air Service Comores (the Comoros) and Iran Air (Iran).

Background information

Today’s update of the Air Safety List is based on the unanimous opinion of the aviation safety experts from the Member States who met from 20 to 21 November 2019 under the auspices of the EU Air Safety Committee (ASC). This Committee is chaired by the European Commission with the support of the European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA). The update equally got the support from the European Parliament’s Transport Committee. Assessment is made against international safety standards, and notably the standards promulgated by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO).

The Commission is constantly looking at ways to improve aviation safety, notably through collaborative efforts with aviation authorities worldwide to raise global safety standards. With this in mind, the Commission, through EASA, will implement two cooperation projects in the course of 2020 to assist Angola and Mozambique to further improve their safety oversight systems.

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The role of data and statistics for evidence based policy making

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photo: UNIDO

An international workshop on data and statistics for evidence-based Voluntary National Reviews (VNRs) taking place at the headquarters of the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) is a joint initiative of UN Statistics Division (UNSD), New York and UNIDO Statistics Division. The voluntary national review is a mechanism for the regular reviews of the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) process which are prepared by Member States and presented to High-Level Political Forum. It facilitates sharing of experiences in monitoring the implementation and achievements towards the achievement of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Opening the workshop, Hiroshi Kuniyoshu, UNIDO’s Deputy to the Director General and the Managing Director of the External Relations and Policy Research Directorate, welcomed the participants and hailed the role of data and statistics for evidence based policy making. He thanked UN Statistics Division for maintaining a close cooperation with the UNIDO statistics division in undertaking such important international event.

The workshop is attended by more than 40 participants representing national statistical offices and policy making bodies of different member-states as well as by representatives from UN agencies and international non-governmental organizations. Participants are presenting the national SDG monitoring mechanisms and processes and discussing the measurement gaps that impede monitoring of national policies. The workshop will continue till 12 December 2019.

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