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Science and technology can help tackle key sustainable development challenges




Integrated science is essential to strengthen water management, sustainably use the oceans and tackle climate change, the head of the United Nations cultural agency said on World Science Day for Peace and Development.

Sciences, Technology and Innovation (STI) provide key answers to build peace and bolster sustainable development,” said Irina Bokova, Director-General of the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) in her message on the World Day.

“We need more integrated science to strengthen water management, to ensure the sustainable use of the ocean, to protect ecosystems and biodiversity, to tackle climate change and disasters, to foster innovation,” she added.

Ms. Bokova underscored that STI stand at the heart of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the Paris Agreement on climate change, pointing out that UNESCO has developed a unique approach to promote global scientific cooperation while encouraging local actions, with the dual focus of gender equality and Africa.

“In this spirit, UNESCO launched in 2017 a ground-breaking international symposium and policy forum on girls’ education in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM), to challenge the gender inequalities in [those fields],” she stated.

Today, as the complexity of the world’s issues goes beyond the framework of a single discipline, UNESCO has made “trans-disciplinarity” the cornerstone of its work for sustainability – building networks with multiple stakeholders, such as museums, universities, private and public actors, governments and non-governmental organizations.

This year’s theme, ‘Science for global understanding,’ encompasses UNESCO’s approach to develop scientific cooperation between and within societies, combining global sustainability and local actions and knowledge.

“There is today an urgent need to promote South-South and North-South-South cooperation to foster STI for sustainable development and to encourage mutual understanding and peace,” she continued. “In this context, science diplomacy will be a powerful instrument for the use of science as a foundation for a culture of cooperation.”

Ms. Bokova stressed that investment in science education would be equally crucial, saying: “We need to grant equal access to enrolment in sciences [to] all persons, starting at an early age, with a strong focus on girls.”

In that spirit, the UNESCO chief called on all stakeholders, well beyond scientific circles, to mobilize in order to release the full potential of sciences for development and peace.

Under UNESCO auspices, the first World Science Day for Peace and Development was celebrated worldwide on 10 November 2002.

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Poland must make urgent legislative reforms to combat foreign bribery

MD Staff



Poland must make urgent progress on carrying out key recommendations of the OECD Working Group on Bribery that remain unimplemented, more than four years after its Phase 3 evaluation in June 2013.

Poland still needs to take urgent steps to ensure companies can be held responsible for foreign bribery, even if the persons who perpetrated the offence are not convicted. In addition, Poland must increase the fines for companies in order to ensure foreign bribery is punishable by effective, proportionate, and dissuasive sanctions.

The Working Group is disappointed by Poland’s failure to take measures to ensure that the “impunity” provision in the Penal Code that applies to foreign and domestic bribery cannot be applied to the bribery of foreign public officials. This provision allows perpetrators of bribery to automatically escape punishment by notifying the law enforcement authorities of the offence before the authorities learn about it from other sources.

In the context of ongoing reforms, Poland should also ensure that appropriate measures are in place to protect from retaliatory or disciplinary action private and public sector employees who report suspected acts of foreign bribery in good faith and on reasonable grounds.

The Working Group reviewed a report submitted by Poland on its progress in implementing these outstanding recommendations at its plenary meeting on 13-15 March 2018. The Working Group requested that Poland provide a written report on further progress in addressing these concerns in December 2018, at which time the Group will consider additional measures in the absence of significant progress.

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Solving the e-waste problem in Latin America




The United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), the Ministry of Environment of Ecuador (MAE) and the Global Environment Facility (GEF), have officially presented a project which will provide policy advice to 13 Latin American countries to help them solve the e-waste problem in the region.

The initiative addresses the proper disposal and recycling of electrical and electronic waste by adopting a circular economy approach  in Argentina, Bolivia, Chile, Costa Rica, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama, Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela.

The inauguration was attended by Ecuador’s Minister of Environment, Tarsicio Granizo,  UNIDO’s Director of Environment, Stephan Sicars,   representatives of national authorities, and ambassadors and representatives of the 13 countries participating in the project.

Sicars pointed out that there are still many challenges that remain for e-waste recycling. “The policies have to be, not only suitable for each individual country, but also sufficiently harmonious to prevent unnecessary, as well as ensuring protection of human health in recycling activities and safeguarding the environment from toxic releases

Meanwhile Granizo emphasized the need to reduce the production of waste and added that “it is necessary to promote national and regional policies that allow community work to be able to deal with the adequate management of electrical and electronic waste, which present a challenge that cannot be addressed only from the national level”.

This initiative will start on 5 June 2018 and will last for five years. During its execution, US$$ 9.5m will be invested, assisting the 13 participating countries both technically and financially, and providing advice on policies, business, legislation, technology and awareness-raising.

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IsDB Prize for Women’s Contribution to Development




Mrs. Hamsatu Nashe Alamin

The Islamic Development Bank (IsDB) has announced the winners of the 13th edition of IsDB Prize on Women’s Contribution to Development.

Mrs. Hamsatu Nashe Alamin, founder of the Network of Civil Society Organisations for Peace in Borno and Yobe, Northeastern Nigeria, and Mrs. Rehma Kasule, founder of Century Entrepreneurship Development Agency (CEDA) in Uganda are the winners of the Prize for the individual category. Each winner will receive US$25000 to support their community work.

A Togo based NGO, (Groupe de réflexion et d’action, Femme, Démocratie et Développement) won the organization category award. The NGO will receive US $100,000 to support its activities. The award will be given in Tunis during the Annual Meeting of the IsDB Group Board of Governors from 1st to5th April 2018.

According to IsDB President, Dr. Bandar Hajjar, “I am confident that this prize will energize the winners to continue working hard in order to change lives in their communities. Building partnership with NGOs and civil society organizations is one of the pillars of the President’s 5-year program (P5P).”

“I am humbled that the little l am doing for the voiceless communities of North Eastern Nigeria is being independently, and in a transparent international manner, identified, recognized and rewarded by this esteemed Islamic financial institution.” Mrs. Alamin stated.

She added that “this is indeed an eye opener for Muslim women, and particularly those of us living in conflict ridden and marginalized worlds to come out and play our part, for the reward now is right here at our doorsteps; for me, this is just the beginning.”

Speaking on the award, Mrs.  Kasule stated: “This award is a symbol of the blessings that I receive for the sacrifices to make the world a better place. This Award is not for me, it is for the dedicated youth ambassadors and mentors,  and  the  young  women  in  post-conflict communities  that keep dreaming despite the challenges that surround them.”

“I will use the prize to produce peace edutainment messages and strengthen interreligious dialogue in schools. I am more energized to take up bold and innovative steps to promote peace education for the youth. I thank IsDB for this honour.” She concluded.

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