Connect with us

Travel & Leisure

A layover at Dubai Airport? Here is what you can do!

Published

on

The Dubai International Airport (DXB) connects the East and the West, offering flights for over 260 destinations worldwide. Dubai’s drive for growing bigger and better every day does not stop at the airport gates, with more than 79 million people already passing through these terminals each year. The city’s second airport, Al Maktoum International at Dubai World Central (DWC), plans to become the world’s largest airport, serving up to 160 million passengers every year.

A stopover overview

With time, Dubai International Airport has grown into the world’s busiest and fastest growing airport. The airport itself, no doubt, is a sight to behold, but those with a layover in Dubai of over 4-5 hours should likely consider checking in their luggage and exploring the attention-grabbing city centre.

With plenty of sights ready to be explored independently – guided tours organised by Emirates and cosmos Holidays – a prolonged, possibly monotonous Dubai layover will transform into something fun as you marvel at the ultra-modern gulf city. Most of the major attractions are located within the same region, making it easier for you to reach the city centre in little time via public or private transport. 

At the airport

  1. Special features

Including the luxe new Emirates Terminal 3, the airport is divided into three terminals. It is usually a quick trip across the terminal to your next flight since an underground train carefully connects the Emirates A380 hub to other gates. The place is home to three main Timeless Spas where you can pass the time with a relaxing massage and manicure.

In case you’re a Muslim, you can seek a spiritual escape at any of the dedicated prayer rooms spread throughout the airport. Other passengers can settle into meditation in one of the two indoor Zen gardens by gates B7 and B27.

  1. Luggage storage

Depending on the size of your luggage, terminals 1 and 3 offer luggage storage facilities for 20-25 AED – for up to 12 hours and it is open 24/7.

You can easily skip the hassle of lugging your bags at the airport, if you’re flying via Emirates, opting to have them delivered anywhere in the UAE. The delivery arrangement is easy at the arrivals hall of Terminal 3, costing up to 250 AED for a maximum of four bags.

  1. Dining

There are a total of 80 diners at the Dubai Airport, ranging from gourmet sit-down restaurants to fast food eateries. You can never go wrong with the Belgian ‘sweet chain’ in order to satisfy the sugar cravings. Boulangerie Le Pain Quotidien is famous for serving organic French fare to go into Terminal 3 departure A Gates.

dubaiphoto1

Photo: Source

If you’re in the mood for something speedy and upscale, try Terminal 3’s Caviar House & Prunier’s Seafood Bar or the Moët & Chandon Champagne Bar Le Lounge in Terminal 3 Gate A. 

The UK favourite Giraffe is situated near gates A and B – a bistro with everything from fast food sandwiches to BBQ rack ribs. For the taste of Southern, Comfort Jack Daniel’s special diner is on tap, situated in Terminal 3, A Gates.

  1. Shopping

The Emirates Terminal 3 duty free is open to any foreign brand shop you can think of, and the best part is that it is open 24/7. Passengers can shop from a wide selection of designer sunglasses, timepieces and top-name luggage from brands like Rolex and Breitling.

dubaiphoto2

Photo:Source

For wine lovers, the extensive collection of vintage, fine wines, and New World is available at the Le Clos shop in Terminal 3.

If you have half/whole day

  1. Transport to the city centre

With just two lines running throughout the entire city, Dubai’s metro system is one of the most convenient transport realms to make use of. Passengers can hop on the red line from Terminals 1 and 3, running every 10 minutes starting from 5:50 am in the morning (5:30 am on Thursdays) until midnight (or 1 am on Thursdays and Fridays). The fares differ depending on the distance and number of transfers, usually ranging from 1.80 AED to 5.80 AED.

The major stops include grand tourist destinations like the Burj Khalifa or Dubai Mall and the grand downtown of Dubai Marina. From Khalid Bin Al Waleed or the Union Square, travellers can connect over to the green line, which usually stops in Deira near the Dubai Creek.

Dubai’s streamlined transportation system comes as a blessing to passengers since they can catch a bus headed straight to main city centre from the metro. Buses depart every 30 minutes from all three main airport terminals, heading to Deira (Bus 401). Fares are 3 AED depending on the distance.

On the other hand, for the hitch-hiking souls, taxi stands are at each terminal, fares starting around 20 AED. A typical ride from the airport to Dubai Marina costs around 100 AED. There is an option for female travellers to hail a woman-only taxi by booking one of the pink cabs.

  1. Touring Burj Khalifa

burjkhalifa2

If we have to name one tourist attraction worth seeing in Dubai, it would be the Burj Khalifa, standing 2716.5 feet above, considered to be the tallest building in the world (at the moment). The towers holds up to 160 stories, however, visitors can only go up to the observation deck, right at the Top, which is known as the highest observation deck in the world occupying the 124th and 158th floors with 360 degree views of the city. Those short on time can purchase a quick ticket so they don’t have to wait in regular long lines. Once you reach the observation deck, feel free to spend some time around absorbing the mesmerizing sights.

  1. The Dubai Fountain

The world’s largest choreographed fountain is situated right within the shadow of the world’s tallest building. Better described as the spectacle, these fountains shoot water up to 125 metres in the air, with a sombre music show accompanying the movement of the water throughout the day and night. Along the board walk, unsurprisingly, the fountains are clearly visible from any point that lines the perimeter of the historical yet manmade Burj Khalifa Lake, making this place a perfect spot for a nice in-transit stroll.

Time Required: The visit to the fountains can last from five minutes onwards – mainly depending on your preferences and timeframe. The actual water, light and sound show plays in 5minute intervals during specific periods of the day. The trip can be easily coupled with a tour of the top section of the towering Burj Khalifa. It is important to note that this does include the time taken to travel from and to the airport.

All in all

In order to travel around comfortably to the major, nearest attractions and to reach the airport back in time for the next flight, it is advisable to have a layover time of at least 8 hours; It is also advised to keep the city’s crazy traffic in mind.

Travellers with a true wandering soul, however, make the best of every opportunity to explore. And this is one of the main reasons why many of them plan their prolonged stop overs in a way that they get to enjoy a new city during their journey. Dubai makes for such a perfect opportunity, therefore, whenever you fly next time, a tour to Asia from the US for example, make sure to give yourself enough hours to take a thorough tour of the gulf city on your way to the world!

Continue Reading
Comments

Travel & Leisure

Gift Giving Traditions Around the World

Newsroom

Published

on

Giving gifts is a tradition as old as mankind itself. It has always been a part of our society. When you give a gift to someone, it tells them that they are special in some way to you. We give and receive gifts for many occasions, like birthdays, mothers days, Christmases, on our anniversary, etc. In fact, gift-giving is so integral to our world that many nations developed interesting traditions around it. Here are some of the most interesting ones.

Japan

When giving a gift in Japan you should be very careful. The Japanese people attach great importance to gifts and consider them something that is mandatory, not just a kind gesture. It is not desirable to surprise them, as they will be embarrassed if they cannot immediately return something to the gift giver. Therefore, it is a good idea to discreetly advise them that you will give them a small memento of your meeting. The gift is given exclusively in private, and it is not common to open it immediately.

South Korea

In Korea, it is extremely rude to give or receive a gift using only one hand, especially if it is the left hand. You must always use both hands at once if doing so. Korean New Years greeting cards or gifts are never with a predominantly red color, as it is used for announcing funerals. Also, avoid gifts that come in sets of four as they symbolize death in Korea.

India

When giving a gift in India, you should always use your right hand. Using the left hand can cause offense as that hand is considered unclean. If giving money in India, try to give a sum that ends with 1. Odd numbers are considered very lucky in India. The number 1 is especially lucky as it signifies a new beginning. Because of this, giving a sum that ends with 1 is believed to grant prosperity to the gift recipient.

Arabs

Gifts are not as important to the Arabs as to other people. They represent something that “gives hospitality a wider dimension”. When someone comes to dinner, small gifts such as flowers and candy are common, and as a sign of special affection, silver, crystals, porcelain, and famous brand items are very appreciated. Handkerchiefs of any kind associate them with parting and tears and should be avoided.

Europe

As far as Europeans are concerned, every nation is a story for itself. The French are quite reserved with gift-giving, the Germans are especially rigid and formal, and the Dutch are a little bit more relaxed. For Italians or Spaniards, the exchange of appropriate gifts is quite acceptable. Russians and people from Eastern European countries appreciate something from your own culture, for example, a CD with your national music or some other kind of token from your country.  Also, in Russia, you should never give someone yellow tulips as they are the symbol of ending a relationship or betrayal.

Ireland

Don’t be surprised if your gift is refused a couple of times in Ireland. This tradition comes from a time when they had the potato famine, and because of this, the recipients are making sure that you can really part from the item that you are offering. It will also show great humility if you refuse the gift they are offering you a couple of times. The standard reply in Ireland when someone receives a gift is “you shouldn’t have gone through all that trouble.”

Kenya

In Kenya, the Maasai people spit on a gift before giving it to someone. This is considered a sign of blessing and with this, they wish the recipient great fortune. Spiting is a very important tradition in Kenya. It is customary to spit on the head of a newborn child and on a hand before shaking it with someone.

Continue Reading

Travel & Leisure

Top 10 Cheap Vacation Destinations in Spring 2020

Published

on

This is going to be a nice, long, relaxing spring. You will get some sun, explore a new destination, and use the awakening force of Nature to recharge your batteries.

What’s your plan for spring break? How about something different this year? You don’t have to choose the nearest beach again. There are wonderful places you can explore. Don’t worry; they won’t be expensive!

You can have a great adventure with a limited budget, only if you plan it well.

We’ll list 10 impressive destinations that give you the feel of luxury travel without eating up your entire savings.

Best Cheap Spring Vacation Destinations for 2020

1. Marrakech, Morocco

Spring is the perfect time for seeing Morocco. You can find affordable accommodation in Marrakech and have day trips from there. The street food is lovely, but most travelers can also afford the cozy restaurants.

Make sure to check the calendar, since Ramadan is in spring. Many restaurants will be closed during the day over that period of time.

 2. Alaska

You can hardly think of something more beautiful than Alaska in spring.

Large ship cruises will cost from $100L per day, but keep in mind that food is included so you won’t spend much more than that.  Late May belongs to the so-called shoulder seasons, so the prices will be lower than usual.

3. Sonoma, California

Napa doesn’t seem like a place we’d feature in a top list for budget travelers. It’s known for its luxurious restaurants and hotels. But Sonoma, Napa’s neighbor, is much more affordable. You can still enjoy exploring Napa, but you won’t spend too much money.

Calistoga is a small town that’s breathtaking in spring. You can search for accommodation there. But hey; camping is also an option.

4. San Juan, Puerto Rico

San Juan is a well-known spring break destination. Mid-April is the best time to go to Puerto Rico. you’ll avoid the summer rains and winter crowds.

The beaches are so beautiful and the food is so cheap that you’ll consider staying longer. That’s always an option! You can hire a service that writes research papers to complete some of your work, and you’ll extend the vacation a bit. In Puerto Rico, it seems like time takes another dimension. Everyone is cool and relaxed.

5. Turkey

Go ahead and google this: Cappadocia. Can you already visualize yourself in one of those balloons?

But that’s not the only important sight to see in Turkey. Istanbul is a story of itself. It’s a beautiful blend between Eastern and Western culture. The food is out of this world. The restaurants are not expensive, but with so much food on the streets and markets, you won’t even think about getting into a restaurant.

Turkey also has beautiful beaches, which are ready for you during the spring months.  

 6. Budapest, Hungary

Budapest is quite possibly the most beautiful European city. Forget Paris; it’s expensive, crowded, and overestimated. Budapest is full of museums and mesmerizing architecture. You’ll love the nightlife, too! If you like Budapest and you would like to write an essay about it, you could use topicsmill to generate a good and suitable topic.

7. Amsterdam, The Netherlands

It’s not about the weed. You don’t have to be high to experience Amsterdam as the most exciting city, ever. The parties are out of this world, and they make Amsterdam the best destination for young people during spring break.

But you’ll also enjoy the cultural tours, parks, and art museums. TripAdvisor offers a great list for Super Savers in Amsterdam. Check it out!

8. Puerto Vallarta, Mexico

The fact that many students choose it as their spring break destination is no coincidence. Puerto Vallarta attracts with beautiful weather, affordable accommodation, and great food. Make sure you plan your vacation during April or early May, so you’ll avoid the hurricane season.

9. Hawaii

Can you imagine the breathtaking Kahului without the crowds?

That’s what your spring break in Hawaii will be like. Spring is awesome because it turns your vacation into a budget-friendly experience. The accommodation will be more affordable when compared to high season. But you can also consider activities labeled as “luxury,” such as scuba diving.

10. Thailand

It’s beautiful and affordable throughout the entire year. Koh Samui and Phuket are great with their fancy resorts, but those are not the only places where you can stay. Even backpackers travel to Thailand. They can still experience the fun in Phuket, but they choose Koh Chang or Koh Phayam for affordable accommodation.

Are You Ready for the Best Spring Ever?

The first thing you need to do is identify your budget.

Then, explore the destinations listed above. Find information about flights, accommodation, food, and all other expenses related to trips. Some of them will probably fit in your budget. Choose the one that attracts you the most!

Continue Reading

Travel & Leisure

Is it safe to travel to Iran as a solo female traveler?

Anna Karsten

Published

on

Before I started reading more into Iran, all I heard about this country were stories about its politics. In the media, Iran seemed like a place where no one would ever want to visit. Can you imagine solo female travel in Iran?

After my trip to Iran, I can tell you now that Iran has the most hospitable people and great architecture. Traveling to Iran as a solo female traveler has been safe, rewarding and fun.

Iran is safe, accessible and totally easy to navigate as a solo female traveler. Sure, you might experience some inconveniences, but for every annoying man you get 3 nice ones, just like anywhere else. Iran is a destination you must see for yourself to see what I mean.

While organized tours are still dominating Iran’s tourism, it’s not uncommon to find another person traveling solo. Backpackers and hostels can be found anywhere on a tourist route from Tehran to Shiraz and Yazd.

Plus, if you can’t find a hostel, a cheap guesthouse is also an option. No matter which way you travel in Iran, you can always find an affordable place to stay for less than $30 a night for a double room.

Iran in Western media

Traveling to Iran or anywhere in the Middle East independently, especially as a woman, isn’t perceived well these days. Some time ago an article about a woman cycling through the Middle East alone went viral. People were wondering whether it’s safe for a woman to cycle alone across the Middle East? The comments weren’t pleasant:

‘It’s foolish and she was very lucky not to get herself raped or killed or both. I hope this article won’t encourage other solo female travelers to visit these countries alone’ – 400 upvotes

‘Not impressed. Putting oneself in harm’s way, which then puts potential rescuers in harm’s way makes little sense.’ – 170 upvotes

But how can we talk about media coverage of safety in Iran when BBC, that published the article, doesn’t even bother to check the facts. The article states: ‘In Iran, I was given more freedom. Yet foreigners are not permitted to stay with locals without permission, and several of my hosts endured an intense grilling by police.’ None of the above is true.

Staying with locals is only forbidden for British, Canadian and American citizens. Anyone else can stay with locals wherever whenever and no police will come and check on you.

U.S. government currently warns against travel to Iran for obvious reasons, these two countries don’t get along. It says that U.S. citizens may be subject to harassment or arrest while traveling in the country.

Again, I’d say that this statement is very exaggerated. Especially after Argo – the film exaggerating the seizure of the American Embassy in Tehran won the Academy Award for Best Picture.

My Advice is: don’t believe what you hear on the news. Explore the place, talk to locals and come to your own conclusions. Come to Iran with an open mind and I guarantee you’ll make many great friends in Iran.

Is it safe to travel to Iran in 2020?

Many travelers, including myself, describe it as one of the ‘safest countries I’ve ever been to’. You’ll be much more likely to get mugged in Europe than in Iran.

Violent crimes against foreigners are extremely rare and, indeed, if you do your best to fit in with local customs (read more on the dress code and how local women fight it), you are unlikely to be treated with anything.

In fact, I’ll be returning to Iran in 2020 to explore even more of its natural beauty.

My experience of traveling solo in Iran

I traveled to Iran solo and later teamed up with another girl whom I met at the hostel. I traveled around the country, in the same way, I would anywhere else in the world.

Wandering around in the evening, taking the metro, using local taxis and buses, going to markets etc.

I met many women whose lives didn’t seem very different from the women I know at home. At the birthday party, it was actually men who had to clean after, not women.

Young girls told me they date the same way people date in the Western world, they just don’t announce it anywhere and keep it to themselves.

I only felt uncomfortable twice in Iran – once in Esfahan (Isfahan) and once in Kashan. In Esfahan a man in a car started driving next to me and my friend in the evening. Every time we moved, he moved. It scared my friend and me for a bit, but the moment we approached another traveler the car left.

Another unpleasant situation I encountered was while walking around the narrow streets of Kashan. I was filming with my DJI gimbal with my iPhone attached to it when I fell someone approaching me on a scooter.

To me, being uncomfortable once or twice doesn’t mean that the place is dangerous. I never once felt physically threatened, unsafe, or at risk, even when I was wandering the streets of Iran.

I felt safer in Iran than if I was walking around in NYC. Even the tap water was safe in Iran!

People believe that Iran is full of moral police watching your every step, ready to arrest Westerners at the slightest provocation. In my experience, this couldn’t be further from the truth.

While cases or reporting and arrests occur, it’s not as common as it’s being portrayed outside of the country.

Everyone I met was extremely helpful and treated me like I was an expensive piece of jewelry. Escorting from one place to the other, while feeling responsible for me. And that’s the people I met on the street for 5 minutes! So unless you’re planning on running around naked with a bottle of smuggled vodka in hand, don’t be afraid.

From our partner Tehran Times

Continue Reading

Publications

Latest

Newsdesk2 hours ago

Palestinian Economy Struggles as Coronavirus Inflicts Losses

An abrupt decline in economic activities and pressure on the Palestinian Authority (PA)’s finances have placed Palestinian livelihoods at high...

Newsdesk4 hours ago

How to promote the resilience of the food production sector during a pandemic

A scientific roundtable, organized through a webinar, gathered food regulators and representatives of the food production sector from Asia, Europe, South...

Newsdesk5 hours ago

ADB, JICA to Strengthen Collaboration to Help Asia in Fight Against COVID-19

Asian Development Bank (ADB) President Masatsugu Asakawa and Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) President Shinichi Kitaoka today reaffirmed their commitment...

Americas6 hours ago

Beware, the Blame-Game Will Backfire

The blames that certain American politicians have been trying to shift to China have all backfired on themselves, and the...

Newsdesk8 hours ago

New $25 Million Support Will Help Djibouti Grow its Economy and Improve Access to Services

The World Bank’s Board of Executive Directors approved on May 29, 2020, two new projects totaling US$25 million in credit...

East Asia10 hours ago

Sino-India clash: A crisscross of geo-politics and geo-economics

Two economic powers of Asia are in a head to head collision over a border clash in the Ladakh sector....

Tourism12 hours ago

Restrictions on Tourism Travel Starting to Ease but Caution Remains

The world is slowly opening up again, new research from the World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) indicates, with destinations cautiously easing...

Trending