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Do We still have Three Branches of Government in America?

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[yt_dropcap type=”square” font=”” size=”14″ color=”#000″ background=”#fff” ] W [/yt_dropcap]hen I was in college in the 60s I took a required course in American Government. It had chapters on Federalism, the Constitution, Checks and Balances, the Three Equal Branches of Government, the demarcation, separation and balancing of power.

As I studied those traditional institutions of the American polity called the United States, so different in many respects from those of other countries and therefore so exemplary to other democracies, I took it for granted that in the future they would remain part of its identity as a nation. Sadly, I am no longer confident that such is and will continue to be the case. Those institutions seem outdated now. What we have around today are “alternate facts.”

What I found intriguing in the formation of this unique form of government, was that the greatest power, taxation, spending, decisions on war, confirmation of members of the President’s Cabinet and justices of the Supreme Court was not located in the White House, the executive branch, but in Congress. Yes, the new nation was a republic, but most importantly, it was also a democracy. The American people, choose who does the governing.

In other words, a parliamentary system wherein legislative and executive powers were joined, had been definitely rejected. Ultimately it is the people, and not the parties, that rule.

All of the above might still have been largely true in the 60s, but one wonders now if it’s still accurate. It is apparent by the fanfare with which a pompous egomaniacal president signs his plethora of executive orders, that the presidency is a centrifuge sucking power from Congress and the sovereign states constituting the confederacy. Those executive orders and regulations have all the semblance of law, but it is only a semblance.

To some extent this state of affairs also exists in the Supreme Court which has held that on most policy questions, statute trumps fiat. The implication seems to be that Congress ought to subordinate its constitutional duties to political concerns.

Congress has steadily abandoned its constitutional responsibilities and its ability to serve as a check on the executive. Consequently, rather than a horizontal structure as intended by the founding fathers, we have ended up with a vertical pyramid with the President sitting on top.

The problem today is that on both sides of the fence Republicans and Democrats in Congress think of themselves not as a separate branch of government, but as messengers of their political parties.

Congress dropped the ball, so to speak, when it attempted to reassert its authority on the declaration of wars, which, as the Constitution prescribes, only Congress can initiate. It tried to mitigate presidential overreach when in 1973 via the War Powers Act they provided that Congress could step in in a presidentially initiated conflict within 60 days of its inception. It is doubtful that any Congress would interrupt a war and abandon troops engaged abroad. In effect Congress abdicated its function of people’s representative by leaving presidents free to initiate conflicts.

Moreover, Congress, who holds the power of the purse, now allows presidents to first submit their proposed federal budgets before even beginning serious discussions about spending decisions.

The judiciary is till theoretically and constitutionally separate from the other two branches, but the fact is that both Republicans and Democrats vies the federal courts, including the Supreme Court, not as an arbiter, but as a branch of the legislature. What seems to be uppermost on those who have to approve nominees is how he/she will rule on controversial political questions. There now in place a litmus test for any potential court nominee. The question is not whether or not the nominee is qualified to function judicially, but whether or not he is a liberal or a conservative. A Supreme Court nominee is viewed as another vote in the Senate.

So, what do we have today of the separation of powers? Basically this: the separation is no longer between the three constitutionally created branches of government but between a branch which consists of the president and his supporters in Congress and on the federal bench, and a branch made up of the opposition party, opposition to the president, those who oppose him in Congress and their co-partisans on the bench. It is beginning to look like a war between fiercely competitive political clubs.

In his Leviathan, Hobbes declares that one of the functions of governments is that of preventing abuses of the weak by the powerful of this world. Machiavelli makes a similar point. What the US founding fathers point out, however, via the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution is that governments too need to be prevented from committing abuses; hence the necessary divisions of authority between the states and central government, and between the branches of the federal government.

The question arises: are we teaching today’s students the same system of government taught in the 60s, the one conceived by the founding fathers? Or, is it a failed system no longer corresponding to the present reality? If that is the case, ought we not be making them aware of that unfortunate fact, at the risk of teaching them an alternate reality with alternate facts?

Professor Paparella has earned a Ph.D. in Italian Humanism, with a dissertation on the philosopher of history Giambattista Vico, from Yale University. He is a scholar interested in current relevant philosophical, political and cultural issues; the author of numerous essays and books on the EU cultural identity among which A New Europe in search of its Soul, and Europa: An Idea and a Journey. Presently he teaches philosophy and humanities at Barry University, Miami, Florida. He is a prolific writer and has written hundreds of essays for both traditional academic and on-line magazines among which Metanexus and Ovi. One of his current works in progress is a book dealing with the issue of cultural identity within the phenomenon of “the neo-immigrant” exhibited by an international global economy strong on positivism and utilitarianism and weak on humanism and ideals.

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Aligning values into an interest-based Canadian Indo-Pacific Strategy

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Russia’s invasion of Ukraine is an explicit challenge to the post-WW 2 order. This order has brought peace and stability and created the conditions for economic growth in the global north and Global South. It has also brought relative peace and economic integration in the Europe and in the Indo-Pacific.

Today, this order is now being challenged by Russia today but also by China. The consequences could mean that a might-is-right approach and Machiavellian approach to foreign policy will become the new normal for countries like Canada, a self-described middle power.

A Machiavellian order is an order in which larger countries can bully, cajole and pressure, mid and small size countries to do what they are demanded is an explicit challenge to Canadian interests, as well as the interests of like-minded countries such as Japan, Australia, South Korea, European countries and countries in the Global South.

The Trudeau Government has clearly and explicitly criticized the Russian government’s invasion of Ukraine by Russia. Ottawa has coordinated with other middle powers and as we speak through the G-7 Summit in Germany on how to handle Russia’s invasion of the Ukraine.

Unity will be important, especially as energy security becomes more and more critical of an issue for Central and Eastern European countries. The growing food crisis that has manifested as a result of the Russian invasion is also an area that the G-7 will need to coordinate to provide relief to many countries in the Global South.

This message will be further discussed at the NATO summit in Spain. Here, Japan, South Korea, Australia New Zealand will join the NATO members to demonstrate their shared commitment to a rules-based order to pushing back against aggression to change the current order and to find ways to work together to support the Ukraine and resist Russian aggression. Here, Canada has an important role in terms of energy security and food security.

With ample access to energy and food resources, there is a possibility for Canada and other partners such as the U.S. to divert some of its significant grain and energy resources to the Europe to help alleviate some of the stress associated with the invasion of Ukraine.

Coordinated military support as well will be important to ensure that the Ukrainians can resist and eventually take back territory that was taken by force by Russia.

There is an interesting paradox in Canada’s approach. While explicitly criticizing Russia’s might-is-right approach to foreign relations in Eastern Europe and particularly with Ukraine, Canada continues to waver in using the same language in the Indo-Pacific.

The Indo-Pacific region is also facing a might-is-right approach to reshaping the Indo-Pacific order. The use of lawfare, gray-zone operations, military force and belligerent threats all are aimed at reshaping the Indo-Pacific order in such a way that creates a Chinese centric regional order in which China’s neighbors as well as stakeholders that engage in the region will think about China’s interests before their own interests and their interest with Washington.

Canada needs to continue to invest in the Indo-Pacific. A good place to start will be to explicitly state Canada’s concerns about that Machiavellian approach to foreign policy in the region and the efforts by China to reshape the region such that states lose aspects of their autonomy. This will require an Indo-Pacific strategy to be built on a clear objective of how Canada sees the Indo-Pacific Region evolving forward and how Canada would like to contribute to that broader vision of the Indo-Pacific.

Japan, Australia, the United States, Germany, Denmark, and the E.U. have laid out their own Indo-Pacific strategies. They focus on maritime security, a rules-based order, transparency, development and importantly, good governance. We see little rhetoric concerning progressive issues as well as little mention of the core values such as democracy, human rights and freedom of press. This is intentional. These countries and associations understand the heterogeneity within the region.

The-Indo Pacific region is home to soft authoritarian regimes, socialist regimes, democracies and monarchies. Unfortunately, each has very different views about democracy, human rights and progressive issues.  

Where they are aligned is in their interests. Their interests are focused on trade, economic integration development, the digital economy, resolving territorial issues through dialogue and consensus-based decision making and not excluding any country region or political entity from the region’s political economy.

Simply, associations and regions like ASEAN, South Asia and the E.U.  see inclusivity as a key criterion to the Indo-Pacific peaceful evolution This means any Indo-Pacific strategy that emerges out of these countries does not exclude China or strive to eject non-democratic states.

Rather, their Indo-Pacific strategies focus on inculcating peace and stability in the Indo-Pacific region through development, trade, infrastructure and connectivity, institution building, good governance and deterrence.

In the Canadian case, the broader vision for the Indo-Pacific should echo but not necessarily replicate the Indo-Pacific Visions of the country’s mentioned above. Canada’s priority should be peace, stability, open access, a transparent, rules-based order that ensures Canada can have free access to economies and societies throughout the region.

At the same time, Canada’s interests in the Indo-Pacific should include shaping the region such that traditional security issues such as territory issues in the South China Sea, East China Sea, the Taiwan Straits and the Himalayan plateau do not devolve into kinetic conflict that fundamentally disrupts the region’s development and stability.

Traditional security issues are not the only issue that can affect Canada’s interests in the region. Non-traditional security issues such as climate change, terrorism, transnational diseases, extremism are all potential concerns for Canada as it could create instability in the region, disrupt their economies, destabilize supply chains as well as create problems for trading partners.

As Canada celebrates another Canada Day, it should reflect upon what are the key elements of an Indo-Pacific strategy.

Here a six-fold approach may be a useful approach to creating an Indo-Pacific strategy that helps achieve Canada’s national interests in the Indo-Pacific region. A first pillar of an Indo Pacific strategy should be one of Inclusive Development.

Here, Canada can help build stability, improve governance and contribute to broad inclusive development in the region. Through support for NGOs, investment in infrastructure and connectivity, coordinating with regional stakeholders and ensuring that inclusive development results in sustainable and replicable development in the region. Importantly, inclusive development in the region should de-emphasize the progressive character of inclusivity found in the domestic context of Canada as it is less prioritized in the region. This does not mean that a progressive approach is absent but it is sensitive to the local cultures and societies.  

A second pillar should focus on Canada’s comparative advantages, Energy and critical mineral security. Based on improvements in environmental technology and technologies that are used to exploit both energy resources and critical minerals, Canada should make this the second pillar of their Indo-Pacific strategy as an open, reliable source of energy and critical minerals.

Canada could carve a position within the Indo-Pacific region in which it is the key provider of energy and critical minerals to industries that use both products. We’ve seen in the wake of the invasion of Ukraine, that energy security has become timely and we expect that energy security and critical minerals to be subject to weaponization in the future in the build-up to or in a conflict.

Consequently, Canada can contribute energy and critical mineral significantly by making this a key pillar in their strategy.

A third pillar should focus on coordinating and investing in Middle Power Diplomacy. In short, Canada needs to coordinate with other middle powers such as Japan, South Korea, Australia, New Zealand European powers to ensure that the US China Strategic competition does not shape them. Rather, coordination shapes the dynamics of the US China Strategic competition in such a way that it decreases and or attenuates the negative effects on countries we’ve already seen Canada engage in middle power diplomacy with some success.

The 2020 Agreement, in which Canada marshaled middle powers and other countries to join a Declaration Against Arbitrary Detention in State-to-State Relations following the arrest of Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor in China is a good example. We also saw Canada bring together middle powers and the United States to discuss denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula in January 2018.

 More coordination of middle powers in the areas of good governance, transparency, energy cooperation and financial cooperation would be a unique but also important contribution by Canada in the Indo-Pacific.

Here, one could easily imagine Canada working with the Partners in the Blue Pacific (PBP) to provide energy security, health infrastructure, good governance to the Pacific Island nations.

We could also see Canada contribute to the Indo-Pacific Economic Framework by marshalling middle powers to support this standard setting agreement that will shape how we think about trade. The standards that we use to negotiate new technologies ,the internet, cyber as well as AI.

A fourth pillar should be supporting Economic security, infrastructure and connectivity. Here Canada needs to find ways to consolidate its own economic security so that is more resilient against economic shocls, outside Canada, as well as inside Canada.

The COVID 19 pandemic is a good example of an external shock to the Canadian economy. We had challenges in terms of acquiring personal protective equipment and other goods as China shut down their country to manage the initial Covid-19 outbreak.

The current COVID-19 policies in Shanghai and Beijing further consolidates the logic that Canada needs to build resilience into its economy, to invest and protect its own economic security.

Internally, the floods in the fall of 2021 in British Colombia also disrupted Canadian exports abroad.

Economic security, resilience and infrastructure and connectivity can help ensure that Canada’s economy remains online and integrated into the global economy and resilient against external and internal shocks. This will require bolstering infrastructure and connectivity at home so that we have world class infrastructure that is resilient against internal shocks.

Also, Canada has a role in contributing to infrastructure and connect to the within the Indo-Pacific region. While we have limited capacities, we have capabilities that can piggyback onto existing infrastructure connectivity programs that are associated with the Quadrilateral Security Dialogue. The Japan-India-Australia resilient supply chain initiative and bilateral and other multilateral infrastructure and connectivity initiatives that have come online over the past three or four years. All of this will be important for Canada’s Indo-Pacific strategy in ensuring that Canada’s economic security is based on a resilient economy that is bolstered by infrastructure connectivity at home and abroad.

A fifth pillar for Canada will continue to be focused on security and in particular, Maritime Security in the Indo-Pacific region. With sea lines of communication in the Indo-Pacific responsible for about $5.5 trillion in trade every year and energy resources being transported through the key arteries located in the Indian Ocean, Malacca Straits South China Sea, Taiwan Straits as well as East China Sea, Canada has an interest in ensuring that the sea lines of communication remain open, governed by international law and free from coercion.

Cooperation in sea lines of communication will need to take place within existing frameworks or new frameworks. Quad plus arrangements have already taken place in January 2021 Canada participated in the Sea Dragon 21 exercises to provide an opportunity for Canada to monitor and observe Quad exercises.

We also see Canada engage in sanctions monitoring in the East China Sea in an effort to prevent sanctions invasions by North Korea. These activities continue to need to be expanded by working with like-minded countries within the region focused on maritime domain awareness search and rescue, humanitarian relief and disaster assistance and dealing with non-traditional security challenges such as illegal fishing, piracy and others.

While this is not an easy task, this pillar of a Canadian Indo-Pacific strategy is important to contributing to the region’s peace and stability as well it is important for protecting Canadian imports and exports to the region. In 2021, more than $21 billion of Canadian goods went through the region this sum continues to increase as Indo-Pacific nations look to Canada to secure energy as well as agricultural products. Ensuring that sea lines of communication remain open, stable and peaceful will continue to be a critical part of any Canadian Indo-Pacific strategy.

Lastly, a sixth pillar of a Canadian Indo-Pacific Strategy should focus on Climate Change.

The Indo-Pacific region is hosts the three most populated countries, Indonesia, India and China. It is also home to ASEAN. Collectively, the population of the Indo-Pacific region is at least 3.5 billion and the current development patterns suggest that they will have severe water and food security issues as their environment degrades do to climate change and global warming.

More extreme weather systems, the salination of the Mekong and Bangladeshi delta’s as sea levels rise will change the ecology of these critical production areas that that will create social instability, economic stress and likely political instability associated with economic refugees moving to find safer, more predictable geographic locations to leave and work.

We will also see tropical diseases and insects push north and southward disrupting agricultural and social systems.

Canada has a clear interest in investing in climate change mitigation, promoting environmentally friendly governance and business systems and technology transfer that lessen the negative impact of climate change. The scale of the problem will require Canada to pursue this sixth pillar through regional and global coordination.

With a pragmatic and realistic approach that is based on understanding the heterogeneity of the Indo-Pacific region, a Canadian Indo-Pacific Strategy should include but not be exclusive to: Inclusive development, Trade and Economic Residence, Climate Change, Maritime Security, Energy and Critical Mineral Security, and Middle Power Diplomacy.

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How ‘Democracies’ Degenerate Into Minoritarian Right-Wing Governments (Aristocracies)

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In America, a woman’s right to an abortion of a pre-conscious (earlier than 20 weeks) fetus is no longer recognized by its federal Government, though, by a 59% to 41% margin (and 67% to 33% among American women, who are the people directly affected), the American people want it to be. That’s one example of America’s dictatorship (minority-rule). (This statement about it isn’t a commentary on the ethics of abortion, but on the polling on abortion, in America.) But there are many other examples of America’s being now a minority-rule nation. 

For example: in February of 2008, a U.S. Gallup poll had asked Americans “Would you like to see gun laws in this country made more strict, less strict, or remain as they are?” and 49% said “More Strict,” 11% said “Less Strict,” and 38% said “Remain as Are.” But, then, the U.S. Supreme Court, in June 2008, reversed that Court’s prior rulings, ever since 1939, and they made America’s gun laws far less strict than the gun-laws ever had been before; and, thus, the 5 ruling judges in this 2008 decision imposed upon the nation what were the policy-preferences of actually a mere 11% of Americans. 

Then, in 2014, there was finally the first scientific answer to the question of whether America is a democracy or instead a dictatorship, when the first-ever comprehensive political-science study that was ever published on whether the U.S. Government reflects the policy-preferences of the American public or instead of only the very richest Americans found that, “the preferences of the average American appear to have only a minuscule, near-zero, statistically non-significant impact upon public policy”; and, so, “Clearly, when one holds constant net interest-group alignments and the preferences of affluent Americans, it makes very little difference what the general public thinks.” 

In other words: America, which nominally is a (limited) democracy, is actually an aristocracy, NOT a democracy at all. Each one of the ways in which America’s laws and their enforcement reflect what the country’s billionaires want, but NOT what the country’s public want, those proposed pieces of legislation have become laws just as much, as happens when the billionaires and the public have the same policy-references regarding the given policy-matter, as when they don’t. This means that the aristocracy always get policies that are acceptable to them, but the public often do not. The result is conservative government regardless of what the public wants. No aristocrat is progressive (for majority-rule — “democracy”); all are instead either overtly conservative (for “fascism,” another term for which is “corporationism”), or else noblesse oblige or hypocritically conservative (“liberals”), people who are pretending to care about the public as being something more than merely their markets (consumers they sell to) or else their workers (their employees or other agents, such as lobbyists). When the public are conservative or “right wing,” (not progressive or “left wing”), they are elitist, not populist — and, especially, they are not left-wing populist (or progressive). Donald Trump was a right-wing populist (which is another form of aristocratic policy-fakery, besides the liberal type — either type is mere pretense to being non-fascist). But no aristocrat is progressive, and this means that in a corrupt ‘democracy’, all of the policy-proposals that become enacted into laws are elitist even if of the noblesse-oblige or “liberal” form of that. The Government, in such a nation, always serves its billionaires, regardless of what the public wants. That’s what makes the country an aristocracy instead of a democracy.

As the former U.S. President Jimmy Carter had said in 2015, commenting upon the profound corruption in America:

It violates the essence of what made America a great country in its political system. Now it’s just an oligarchy with unlimited political bribery being the essence of getting the nominations for president or being elected president. And the same thing applies to governors, and U.S. Senators and congress members. So, now we’ve just seen a subversion of our political system as a payoff to major contributors, who want and expect, and sometimes get, favors for themselves after the election is over. … At the present time the incumbents, Democrats and Republicans, look upon this unlimited money as a great benefit to themselves. Somebody that is already in Congress has a great deal more to sell.

In France, one of the primary sources of the dictatorship is the dictatorship’s intensification in 2008 from a new Constitutional provision, Section Three of Article 49, which facilitates rule-by-decree (“executive decree”) from the President, when the Parliament is opposed to his policy-preferences. This Section gives the aristocracy an opportunity to override Parliament if the other methods of corruption (mainly by France’s having no “ban on donors to political parties/candidates participating in public tender/procurement processes” — predominantly arms-manufacturers who are donors) are insufficient to meet the desires of the aristocracy, but, otherwise, France has remarkably strict laws against corruption — far stricter than in Germany, and in Russia — and thus the French Government represents mainly corporations that sell directly to the Government. Consequently, when “all else fails,” and the Parliament turns out to be inadequate (insufficiently imperialistic) in the view of France’s billionaires, Section 49-3 is applied by the President. (America, like France, has strict laws against corruption, but they are loaded with loopholes, and, so, America has almost unlimited corruption. America’s legislature is even more corrupt than is France’s.) Ever since France’s Tony Blairite Socialist Party (neoliberal-neoconservative) Prime Minister Manuel Valls started in 2016 to allow French Presidents to use the 2008-minted 49-3 Section to rule by decree and ignore Parliament, France has increasingly become ruled-by-decree, and the Parliament is more frequently overridden.

After the recent French Parliamentary elections, the current French President, Emmanuel Macron, who has often been ruling by decree, will do so even more than before. As the Iranian journalist in Paris, Ramin Mazaheri, recently said: “Elections at just 46% turnout are a hair’s breadth away from not having democratic credibility, but that must be added with [to] the constant use of the 49-3 executive decree and the certainty of a Brussels’ veto for any legislation they don’t like. It combines to modern autocracy – rule by an oligarchical elite.”

Perhaps low voter-turnout is an indication that the nation will have a revolution. After all, both America and France did that, once, and it could happen again, in order to overthrow the aristocracy that has since emerged after the prior one was overthrown. Someone should therefore tabulate how low the voter-turnout has to go in order for a revolution to result. The post-1945 American Government has perpetrated incredibly many coups against foreign governments, but perhaps the time will soon come when dictatorships such as in America and France become, themselves, democratically overthrown. Both countries have degenerated into minoritarian right-wing governments. At least in France, the public seem to be becoming aware of this fact. Neither Government now has authentic democratic legitimacy.

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Striking Down Roe vs. Wade in Nonmoral America

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As a conditional  pro-life American, to me,the recent U.S. Supreme Court decision to strike down  Roe vs. Wade handed down 50 years ago ,symbolizes much more than  what meets the eye. That is, this precedent violating high court decision means  much more than making a girl’s or  woman’s right to choose whether to give birth or not,  a matter of  each  of our  52 states’ and other jurisdictions’ decisions rather than a  constitutional human right, thus for all girls and  women no matter where they reside in the United States of America. 

This  precedent violating Supreme Court decision ,basically putting females back into the kitchen under the thumbs of men in image if not in reality, also says much about how  traditional gender roles   thinking in the United States remains about  girls and women and about child bearing and other sexual behavior matters. After all, this is one of the few developed nations in the world which has yet to  elect a woman President,  Chief Justice, or Leader in the upper legislative chamber. The majority of heads of American  elite corporations,  universities,  faith communities, and media are  men. Digital technologies,  like sciences and technologies in general, are still very much in men’s hands.  Especially white women  ,moreso than their nonwhite sisters,may have progressed in becoming better educated  and becoming professionals,  but studies show childrearing and household  chores are still done by women in general  than with  a spouse or an otherwise male companion let alone a son or grandson  assisting.

All of these facts of life regarding sustaining patriarchy  since colonial days ,with spurts of

female human rights improvements  now and again ,are well hidden through an elite East-West coasts  media which paints an exaggerated picture of progress in  girls and women  human rights which simply is not  here in reality. The greatest example in American politics of  most white women supporting traditional gender roles    is in 2016, 53 % of the white women electorate voted for Trump and in 2020  slightly  more at 55% and  remain amongst his most loyal political defenders in public life. This is despite Trump’s and Trumpism’s  well known misogynistic views. 

It  has been claimed  much white women support  for Trump and Trumpism has to do with efforts to maintain white supremacy including the fervent need for the  reproduction of the declining  dominant white population. True or not, it can also be said more than likely  much of Trumpland women support  regardless of their ethnicity or economic  class, stems from embracing  traditional values about the place of women in enduring patriarchal America. This is said realizing even the trickle of black and other non- white women who voted for Trump increased from 2016 to 2020 Presidential election years.

Besides the Supreme Court’s affirmation of  patriarchal traditional national views about  girls and women making  abortion decisions  through tossing it to states to decide  now varying from state to state ranging from bans to exceptions to legal status, there is much more disturbing news to consider. First, as well claimed in the highest public places , the now scattered  state’s rights mapping of where abortions can and cannot take place has still in another way polarized our deeply divided nation. And it discriminates against poor women, especially those who are non-whites in banned states unable to afford to travel  out of state also making them moreso victims of illegal abortion doctors and  engaging in high risk  self aborting,  including with pills easily purchased through the internet legally.

Second, The Supreme Court’s striking down of Roe vs. Wade , engineered  by right wing zealots exacerbated the continued problem of abortion in America as a taboo topic  be it a constitutional federal or state’s rights issue. Unless public awareness interventions are skilfully designed, implemented, monitored, and evaluated as required nation wide  federal policies,American males and females will  remain disturbingly naive about the long term psychological and socioeconomic consequences of having or not having an abortion. This is because  the mainstream  elite media ,our leaders  in all levels of education ,and  our medical and mental health let alone  non- profit and faith leaders remain mum or stigmatized about  soberly discussing abortion matters in public spaces where such information is so desperately needed in this still very much Victorian society.

Thirdly, the court decision  in question has deeply troubling symbolism of a morally broken highest court in a nation with a deepening nonmoral political leadership and a growing nonchalant electorate increasingly willing to vote against their own interests and that of their nation as a plural democracy going through massive gender and racialized  ethnic demographic changes. The decision was orchestrated  behind the scenes by the senior  Associate  Justice who has much less clean hands in how he entered the  highest court with a colleague  sexual harassment and pornograohy charge cloud  over his head which has yet to be resolved.  His fellow justice supporters were the actual  decision writer and as well  three justices who lied to Senators privately and in their hearings about their belief in precedent preservation with one of them entering the court with verified sexual misconduct charges.

 There is something immorally smelly  about this because  moral rot is the real case of a Supreme Court going down hill since 2000. Namely, since in 2000,  when the Republican driven Supreme Court majority, while breaking their own usual judicial rules  of non-federal interference, gave George W. Bush the Presidency, the moral authority of our highest court  has been downspiraling in a  deepening nonmoral society.

Through more or less  skillful  media  and otherwise  political spin gurus,  nonmorality not only in the highest court and the other two branches of federal and not a few state governments  has been   justified and said to be ok as the American electorate in Midterm 2022 and Presidential 2024 elections prepares to go to the polls . Unless we are astutely  mindful,  we will more than likely vote for the same nonmoral leaders  again or new ones to assure right wing Republican majorities in all three  government branches– Executive( President),  Judiciary Supreme and other federal courts),  and Legislative ( Congress). Such nonmoral leaders who are supposed to be doing right moral things after we elect them  or are appointed, are more intune to  making bad decisions through listening to lies and liars pedaling to legal and  dark money interests than  standing up for the truth and voting for what is best for their voting constituencies and for our country.  And then once they are betrayed, such as the Senators who voted for the 3 Trump Supreme Court justices  who lied to them and went on to  form the Supreme Court bloc which struck down Roe vs. Wade, they plead their innocence while we the people  will suffer the consequences of their bad nonmoral decision-making for years to come, in this case girls and women and their families and communities. All of us.

All of this has made the American coins and dollars declaring ” In  God we trust”  to be such a grotesque hollow ring so clearly seen abroad and at home by those no longer afraid to speak truth about us as a nonmoral nation with a morally broken higher court ; a morally inept Congress  which years ago could have passed legislation to more deeply sustain girls and  women human rights  in a coherent comprehensive way but except with piecemal fragments over the years, indeed decades, has yet to bother to pass,  no matter which party is  in control;and  a Presidency  no matter the party in charge, which just drifts here and there with a nonmorality rooted in damage control , photo ops, and warmongering interests  than coherent and sustaining moral leadership of a deeply troubled polarized  nation of  excluding women like others except wealthy white men  since our colonial days.

Lest we  Americans awaken quickly from our nonmoral slumber, the striking down of Roe vs. Wade  is the tip of the nonmorality iceberg of things to come since  nonmortality knows no limits let alone cares about the whole of humanity. None of us will be safe or saved.

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