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Terrorism

Turkey’s Independence Struggle

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[yt_dropcap type=”square” font=”” size=”14″ color=”#000″ background=”#fff” ] W [/yt_dropcap] e are witnessing terrorist organizations using a tool in the war between countries. Turkey has been fighting PKK terrorist organization for 35 years. But this is just tip of the iceberg. The PKK is just a simple terrorist organization.

Turkey, on the other hand, is a powerful state based on the Ottoman Empire, whose history is full of wars, which dominated 3 continents. The continuation of this war for 35 years indicates that Turkey has not fought a simple terrorist organization. For 35 years, Turkey has been fighting against the coalition of countries that provide arms to the PKK terrorist organization and provide logistical support. It is not possible to fight against Turkey unless the PKK terrorist organization obtains support from the outside. A simple terrorist organization can never fight a big state for 35 years.

States with imperial aims in the Middle East use the PKK terrorist force against Turkey. When Turkey does not accept the policies of these states, the PKK terrorist organization is attacking in Turkey. Bombs explode in Turkey when Turkey, Asia and Middle East countries and oil and natural gas agreements are made. These are never a coincidence.

Turkey has made important progress in the defense industry in recent years. These progresses are very important in terms of Turkey’s national independence. Because Turkey understood that on July 15th the coup and occupation initiative was solitary and that allies were not helped. In fact, Turkey understand that some of its allies were supporting the FETO terrorist organization in the coup attempt. For this reason, after the coup and invasion attempt, the prospect of economic and political independence emerged.

Turkey is a strategically important country. Countries that are friendly with Turkey have achieved significant gains. Some countries support terrorist organizations against the possibility of the axis change of Turkey. Terrorist organizations used against Turkey and supported by some countries are PKK terrorist organization, FETO terrorist organization, ISIL terrorist organization.

Let’s just look at the attack by the PKK and ISİL terrorist organizations in Turkey in 2016. (Source: http://www.aljazeera.com.tr/haber/2016daki-bombali-saldirilar)

January 12, 2016 – Istanbul, Sultanahmet

In the suicide attack of ISIS in Sultanahmet Square in Istanbul, 13 German tourists lost their lives. Fourteen foreign nationals were injured in the explosion.

January 14, 2016 – Diyarbakır, Çınar

In the Çınar district of Diyarbakir, the Police Headquarters building, where the police lodge was located, was attacked by PKK members with bombed vehicles. Two of them lost their lives. 39 people were injured, including 6 police and 8 police officers.

February 17, 2016 – Ankara

In Ankara, 29 people, including civilians, lost their lives in a bombed vehicle attack on service vehicles carrying Turkish Armed Forces personnel. 61 people were injured in the attack. Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu said the attack was carried out by the PKK in Syria. The PKK-affiliated organization TAK stated that the action was carried out by them.

March 13, 2016 – Ankara, Red Crescent

A car bomb was detonated near Güvenpark in Ankara Red Crescent. The PKK killed 37 people and 71 people were wounded in the attack.

19 March 2016 – Istanbul, Istiklal Street

Istanbul, on Istiklal Street, killed 5 people, including himself, as a result of an explosion of the bomb on the member of ISIS. 37 people were wounded in the attack. Twelve of the injured were foreign nationals.

March 31, 2016 – Diyarbakır

7 policemen were killed in the bombardment attack on the police service near the Diyarbakir Bus Station. 13 police and 14 civilians were injured. The attack was organized by the PKK.

April 27, 2016 – Bursa

Bursa, Ulu Camii next to a live bomb attack that killed a person, 13 people were injured. Attack PKK-affiliated TAK has undertaken. Dönem Interior Minister Efkan Alla explains that the attacker is a 24-year-old PKK member Traitor.

May 1, 2016 – Gaziantep

Gaziantep police headquarters building was attacked with a bombed vehicle, 2 police martyrs, 19 police, 23 people were injured. It was announced that the attack was linked to ISID.

May 12, 2016 – Diyarbakir

A bomb-loaded truck belonging to the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) killed 16 people, 23 others were injured in the Dürümlü field of Sur province of Diyarbakir.

June 7, 2016 – Istanbul, Vezneciler

The Istanbul Vezneciler was attacked with a bombed vehicle. Six policemen were killed and five civilians were killed in an attack targeting the aggressive force. 36 people were wounded in the attack on 3 heavy. The attack was a TAK.

June 8, 2016 – Mardin, Midyat

The police headquarters in Mardin’s Midyat district was attacked with a bombed vehicle. Two of the police have lost their lives in the attack. 34 people were injured. PKK attacked the attack.

June 28, 2016 – Istanbul

At the Istanbul Atatürk Airport, 45 people were killed and 239 people were injured in the armed attack on three people who were reported to be members of ISIS.

August 1, 2016 – Bingöl

7 policemen were killed and 2 policemen were wounded in bombardment attack against armored midibus carrying agile police officers in Bingöl. PKK attacked the attack.

August 10, 2016 – Diyarbakir

On the way to Mardin in Diyarbakir, besides a vehicle belonging to agile force, the bomb-laden vehicle lost five civilian lives after the explosion of the vehicle. 5 police and 12 people were injured. PKK attacked the attack.

August 10, 2016 – Mardin, Kızıltepe

Mardin Kızıltepe municipality in the parking lot bomb-loaded vehicle detonated during the passage of vehicles carrying agile force teams. In the explosion, a police officer and two civilians lost their lives. 5 police officers injured 30 people. PKK attacked the attack.

August 16, 2016 – Diyarbakir, Çınar

In the Çınar district of Diyarbakir, the PKK attacked the Regional Traffic Directorate with a bombed vehicle. In the attack, 5 police officers were martyred, one kid lost 2 civil lives.

August 17, 2016 – Van

Police detonated a bomb-laden vehicle parked in front of two April Police Station in Van city center, and the police lost four lives. Twenty police officers and 72 police officers were hurt. PKK attacked the attack.

August 18, 2016 – Elazig

Elazığ Police Department, organized by the PKK bombers attacked 5 security guards were killed, 217 people were injured.

August 20, 2016 – Gaziantep

52 people lost their lives in a suicide attack on a henna night in Gaziantep, 94 people were injured. Officials said the attack was behind ISIS.

August 26, 2016 – Sirnak, Cizre

11 police officers were killed and 78 people were injured in the bombed vehicle attack in the agile force branch directorate in Cizre province of Şırnak. PKK attacked the attack.

September 12, 2016 – Van

The PKK attacked the first day of the Feast of Sacrifice in Van city center with a bombed vehicle. At the police point in front of AK Party Provincial Presidency, 53 people were wounded in the explosion and 53 people were injured. PKK attacked the attack.

October 6, 2016 – Istanbul, Yenibosna

Ten people were injured in a motorcycle-bombing explosion near the police station in Yenibosna, Istanbul. One day after the security units, a PKK member caught in the province of Aksaray said that the attack was a fallacy.

4 November 2016 – Diyarbakır, Bağlar

The Police Department, located in the Bağlar district of Diyarbakir, was attacked by a vehicle loaded with a bomb near an additional building where the branches of Anti-Terror and Aggressive Force took place and 2 police officers lost their lives. The attack was carried out by both the ISIS and the PKK-linked TAK. The Governor of Diyarbakir announced that the PKK was attacking.

November 24, 2016 – Adana

The bomb-loaded car exploded in Adana Governor’s car park. Two people lost their lives in the attack and 33 people were injured. The attack was undertaken by the organization TAK.

December 10, 2016 – Istanbul

Besiktas-Bursaspor after the match in front of the Vodafone Arena was detonated a vehicle in the course of 45 seconds later, immediately stopped at a nearby Maçka Park a person himself exploded.

Most police officers lost at least 38 people during the attacks targeted by the police. More than 150 people were injured. Officials pointed to the PKK as a felicitous assault.

These are attacks that are only in 1 year. Turkey is in a great war. The countries behind these terrorist organizations know the Turkish state very well. These are so cowardly countries that they do not want to fight directly with Turkey. Because they know very well how they are being disrupted by the Turks in history.

But as President Erdogan said in his historical speech breaking record on Youtube:

“Turkey is not just the name of country

Turkey also is a name of hope for millions of oppressed and aggrieved Muslim.

We know clearly the purpose of ruse in Syria at the expense of 400.000 innocent people

We are quite aware of the underlying causes that why the terrorist organization are dragging region again into blood and destruction, while they were at the phase of armistice once.

I’m telling one more time;

THEY WON’T SUCCEED !

If the point had been preponderance of numbers or weapons:

Sultan Alp Arslan wouldn’t have succeed

Kilij Arslan wouldn’t have succeed

Malik Shah wouldn’t have succeed

Murad Hüdavendigâr wouldn’t have succeed

If the point had been just technology the Gallipoli campaign would result in different,

Turkish war of independence would have result in different

They won’t divide our citizens !

They won’t break into pieces our country !

They won’t prevent us from waving to our flag !

They won’t silence the azans that play five times every day !

do you know what is the point ?

“la galibe illlallah” [The victor only belongs to Allah ]

We will know that !”

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Terrorism

UN launches new project to address link between terrorism, arms and crime

MD Staff

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Cheap and easily accessible small arms are increasingly becoming the “weapon of choice” for many terrorist groups, the UN counter-terrorism chief told an event on Friday aimed to raise awareness of the nexus between terrorism, organized crime and illicit small arms trafficking.

“Insufficient international response in countering the illicit trafficking of small arms and light weapons, the challenges that Member States face to detect and seize them, as well as porous borders, allow terrorists and criminals to move illicit weapons from one country or region to another,” said Vladimir Voronkov, UN Under-Secretary-General for Counter-Terrorism.

It is widely acknowledged that the connection between terrorism and organized crime, including illicit small arms and light weapons trafficking, is a serious threat to international peace and security. It is also an obstacle to sustainable development and a menace to the rule of law.

To illustrate the challenges, Mr. Voronkov, who is also Executive Director of the UN Counter-Terrorism Centre (UNCCT),

of the UNOffice of Counter-Terrorism (UNOCT), revealed estimates indicating that the African continent alone has one hundred million uncontrolled small arms and light weapons concentrated in crises zones and security-challenged environments.

“With an estimated population of 1.2 billion in Africa, this is an unfortunate and significant ratio of one to 12”, he lamented.

Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy

Without a strong international response, terrorists and criminals would easily be able to move illicit weapons from one country or region to another.

The UN Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy underlines the connection between terrorism and the illicit small arms trafficking, conventional ammunitions and explosives, and calls on Member States to strengthen coordination and cooperation to address this challenge.

The UNOCT chief illustrated this through the example that “illicit weapons originating from Libya were finding their way into the Lake Chad Basin and the Sahel”.

Since ast year, UNOCT and the UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) worked closely with the UN Counter-Terrorism Committee Executive Directorate (CTED) and UN Office for Disarmament Affairs (ODA) to develop a project enhancing national legislative, strategic and operational capacities to prevent, detect and counter the firearms trafficking and other illegal activities related to terrorism and organized crime in Central Asia.

“The project is also another example of our ‘All-of-UN’ approach to support counter-terrorism efforts of Member States”, concluded Mr. Voronkov. 

No country alone

In her video statement, UNODC Executive Director Ghada Fathi Waly affirmed her Office’s “unique approach” to addressing the complex interlinked challenges of terrorism, crime and corruption.

Using a “holistic approach”, Ms. Waly maintained that the project tackles “the full range of obstacles”.

She singled out adequate legal frameworks, strengthening law enforcement and criminal justice capacity, improving data and addressing cooperation gaps, saying that it is “essential to deal effectively with threats that no country can face alone”.

UNODC supports nations in implementing global counter-terrorism instruments, as well as the Firearms Protocol to the UN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime, through the UNODC Global Firearms Programme.

“I will be eagerly following the project’s advancement and I hope that its outcomes and learnings can inform the international community’s efforts, feeding into the next reviews of the UN Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy, this year and in 2022”, concluded the UNODC chief.

Preventing terrorists’ access

Meanwhile, CTED Deputy Executive Director Weixiong Chen pointed out that the new initiative is “one of the important requirements of several relevant Security Council resolutions”.

Citing five resolutions, he noted that “the Council has repeatedly stressed the importance to prevent terrorist access to weapons”.

Mr. Chen noted that the most recent resolution, 2317, brought a comprehensive new set of topics and domains, saying that they have strengthened CTED’s mandate, particularly through its “assessments, analyses and identification of gaps”.  

The CTED chief underscored the importance of Member States’ will to implement Security Council resolutions on preventing illicit small arms and light weapons trafficking and concluded by sharing his hope “that OCT and UNODC will be able to fully utilize CTED’s expertise and recommendations in this field”.

The launch also introduced the new project’s activities, including missions to assess regional situations, relevant legislation and response capacities to the threat posed by firearms trafficking, terrorism and related crimes.

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Terrorism

Escaping IS: What Exiting an Armed Group Actually Takes

Dr. Siobhan O’Neil

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Authors: Dr Siobhan O’Neil and Dr Mara Revkin*

Although Islamic State’s territorial control of large swathes of Iraq and Syria came to an end in 2017, civilians, and particularly children, in these areas are still living with the long-term consequences of the group’s violence and exploitation. According to a new report by Human Rights Watch, this includes thousands of children abducted by Islamic State (IS) who remain unaccounted for today and thousands of children who cannot move on from conflict because they are viewed as threats and won’t be allowed to reintegrate back into society.

Last week, International Day Against the Use of Child Soldiers was marked around the world to reflect on the policies and programmes that are most likely to protect rights, promote accountability, and enhance security of young people in armed conflict. In doing so, it is clear that many of the current approaches to those once associated with armed groups do not always strike the right balance. Children’s rights and best interests risk being trumped by short-sighted security considerations, which may ultimately put us all at greater risk.

One such child is “Amr”* – a juvenile detainee at a reformatory in Kurdish Iraq – who we met while undertaking research examining the recruitment and use of children by armed groups. After dropping out of elementary school at the age of 12, Amr worked at a steel factory. One year later, he would become employed as a cook by IS. 

Amr was an unlikely recruit. For one, the group had murdered his father. But Amr needed the job in the IS kitchen. It paid better than the steel factory, and he was now responsible for helping support his mother and six siblings, so he felt that he had little choice. A few months after he started to work for IS, Amr was recruited by a family member to spy on the group for a state-sponsored militia. After he was caught taking photographs, Amr was thrown into an IS prison. He eventually managed to escape, only to be caught by security forces and imprisoned again for the crime of having joined a terrorist group.

In many ways, Amr’s story exemplifies the complexity of association with armed groups today. It is often assumed that anyone who becomes involved with such groups must have been brainwashed or be driven by deep-seated ideologically-motivated hate. Yet, involvement with armed groups – even those deemed “violent extremist” like IS or Boko Haram – is never as simple as this conventional narrative, nor is exiting their grasp. 

For many like Amr, ideology played no role in motivating or facilitating his involvement with IS or the anti-IS militia. Indeed, our previous research in conflict areas found that young people associating with armed groups are usually influenced by a multitude of interrelated structural, social, individual, and historical factors, of which ideology was rarely the driving determinant. Rather, physical and food security, family and peer networks, financial incentives, coercion, and the pursuit of status and identity were more central for explaining the involvement of many young people with armed groups.

In many countries there is little differentiation made in how or why individuals were associated with such groups. As documented in related research, the use of indiscriminate “iron fist” approaches means that tens of thousands of people – not just those associated with military functions, but also tax-payers, cleaners or cooks like Amr – have been detained on terrorism charges, with thousands believed to have been sentenced to death. Thousands of children languishing in Syria have been barred or discouraged from returning to their home countries, despite the fact that many had no choice in living under IS. This sort of collective punishment could further encourage cycles of violence. We must find ways out for the vast majority of individuals who are associated with armed groups but who do not pose a risk to society.

To create a safer future, and to avoid denying one to the children who have lived under or been associated with armed groups, we need to better understand their experiences and needs for transitioning to a life oriented away from conflict. We need to rethink our assumptions about armed group association and neutrality in conflict, engage children and youth as partners in their own recovery, and support them in the long-term exit process from armed groups. Only then will young people like Amr have a real chance to escape the pull of violent conflict and give back as productive members of their communities.

* Name has been changed for safety reasons.

*Dr Mara Revkin was the lead researcher on the Syria and Iraq case study featured in Cradled by Conflict and the Iraq case study for The Limits of Punishment: Transitional Justice and Violent Extremism. She is a National Security Law Fellow at the Georgetown University Law Center.

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Foreign fighters: ‘One of the most serious dimensions’ in global counter-terrorism struggle

Newsroom

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Over the past few years, ISIL and Al-Qaida terrorist fighters have posed an “unprecedented threat to international peace and security”, the UN counter-terrorism chief said on Wednesday in Vienna, at the close of a joint UN- Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) regional conference on addressing challenges posed by terrorists who have gone to fight overseas. 

Under-Secretary-General of the UN Office of Counter-Terrorism, Vladimir Voronkov, recalled that last week he presented to the Security Council the Secretary-General’s report on the continuing threat posed by ISIL.

“ISIL is resurgent as a covert network in Iraq and Syria”, he said. “Thousands of foreign terrorist fighters remain at large, posing a threat to Iraq, Syria, and the countries they might return or relocate to”. 

Key conclusions 

Mr. Voronkov stressed that all sessions of the conference underlined the need to further strengthen international, regional and bilateral counter-terrorism cooperation – with many participants highlighting the centrality of the UN Global Counter-Terrorism Strategy.

He highlighted that the Joint Plan of Action (JPOA) for implementing the Strategy in Central Asia “could serve as a model for collaboration in other regions”. 

“We are also working closely with the Arab Interior Ministers Council to strengthen Arab countries’ measures to effectively counter terrorism”, using JPOA as a model, he said.

According to the Counter-Terrorism chief, participants stressed the urgent need for gender and age-sensitive programmes to assist children linked with terrorist groups.

As thousands of children remain trapped in Syria and Iraq, facing a multitude of challenges, including rejection and life-long stigmatization, Mr. Voronkov stressed that Member States have “the primary responsibility to address the plight of their nationals, including children trapped in conflict zones”. 

“Children should always be seen as victims and efforts to address their plight should be based on the best interest of the child”, he spelled out.

Disrupt terrorist travels

The need to prevent, detect and disrupt the travel of foreign terrorist fighters, in accordance with international law, was front and centre during discussions as well, drawing attention to the importance of enhancing Member States’ capacities to do so.

“Both the OSCE and the UN are helping countries adopt and use Advance Passenger Information and Passenger Name Record data systems”, he informed those gathered, calling the UN Countering Terrorist Travel Programme “a flagship demonstration” of how the UN system, together with international policing organization INTERPOL and others, are “working as one” to provide tailored, impactful assistance to Member States.

Noting that “the phenomenon of foreign terrorist fighters is one of the most serious dimensions of the terrorist threat”, Mr. Voronkov concluded by urging Member States to continue working together, through the UN and other platforms, “not only to protect people on their own territory, but extend solidarity and assistance beyond their borders”.

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