Connect with us

Economy

Trump-o-nomics

Osama Rizvi

Published

on

[yt_dropcap type=”square” font=”” size=”14″ color=”#000″ background=”#fff” ] A [/yt_dropcap]s it happened, the unimaginable, the least possible, a threat to some, and a concern for others. Aye, I talk about the rhetoric spewing, rabble-rousing and populist Mr. Trump. His triumph on November 8th, 2016 sent shock-waves and the whole world was put in a state of quiver.

The financial markets yawed like a boat turning turtle. The far-eastern’s gasped. The Europeans confounded. Middle-East intimidated. I, not at all surprised. From oil policies to tax reforms Mr. Trump carries some radical ideas. His red power tie sometimes throws flashes of the ‘new’ future waiting for the world.

Being a businessman, which used to be his prime identity, himself he is well aware of the ploys that U.S companies use holding billions of dollars in alien lands which ought to sit in America. Take the case of for example, Apple Inc. The recent tax issue gave me a chance to read about the two companies that Apple has founded in Ireland. Apple holds approximately $180 billion offshore due to the sweat-inducing corporate tax of 38%. Also, according to an estimate top 50 U.S companies hold $1.4 trillion offshore. According to Citizens for Tax Justice, an advocacy group, U.S companies due to these tax havens avoid $90 billion in taxes. Enough for context. Mr. Trump has vowed to introduce diminutive taxes providing a pat on the back of balking U.S companies inviting them to suck the money back into their homeland. Good for the US but not for the world.

But there is an issue. An inherent contradiction. If he reduces down the taxes then by which magic wand is he supposed to ramp up the government spending? Debt, obviously. Also, to consider the case of bringing back jobs to US consider the curious case of “Rust Belt”. The north-eastern region which was the hub of industry gradually slowed down and the blame was thrown on the Chinese. A research was carried out and to everyone’s surprise it was find out that only 10-20% jobs were lost due to Chinese or other foreign intervention and more than 80% was due to Automation. Anyhow, if we assume that he brings the jobs back then better employment conditions which in turn would add to the GDP ergo, increasing inflation insinuating to the interest rate hike for which the Federal Reserve Bank of America already looks very keen. But this is my hunch, an educated speculation. The opinion that Fed’s autonomy will itself be affected as in manipulations is also rife. As The Economist says:

“Mr. Trump has expressed criticism of the monetary-policy choices of Janet Yellen. If she stays on the job her term will nonetheless be up in 2018, while Mr. Trump is president. Before then, he will have the opportunity to fill seats on the Boards of Governors.” Also, “It is not impossible that that Mr. Trump would prefer a less independent Fed committee to getting him re-elected, however, in which case policy could actually become more dovish leading, may be to faster growth in output and a rise in inflation”.

(If it went as per my speculation then) an increase in the interest rate will have two effects. The one will be, as all the economic-savvy individuals will know, the difficulty countries with huge debt and import from the U.S will face. As dollar strengthens countries like Mexico, Russia, Philippines, Turkey and Chile, with large onus of dollar debt, are at the greatest risk. The second one takes us to the far-east-China. Last year when the FOMC increased the interest rates, around $300billion of capital fluttered from the Chinese markets flying all the way to Americas and perched themselves on the branches of Wall Street. Also, as China segues into the ‘new-economy’ a weaker Yuan will not help. On the contrary, it will hurt the domestic consumption (which is to go up as per the new plan).

A Pro-driller: A Cold Environment

The news that Mr. President is mooting to cherry-pick Mr. Harold Hamm, chief executive of US private oil firm Continental Resources, has provided a support to oil prices and a disappointment to the environmentalists. According to Thomas Watters managing director with S&P Global Ratings, as the USA today reports, Trump presidency cherish not a profound control over the oil dynamics. It is price that had, is and will guide the process. Alluding to the recent fall in rig count he establishes that it was not due to any regulations but solely because the plummeting prices. Another perspective, as scribbled down by an energy expert in Forbes magazine, is of the view that the domestic mid-stream sector is going to see its heyday in the future. As Mr. Trump, a corporatist, doesn’t shares the commensurate amount of alarm concerning the global climate changes the Keystone XL pipeline, rejected by the Obama administration, may restart. Another one is North Dakota Pipeline which, due to protests by the environmentalists, was not sanctioned may now get an approval.

Albeit Mr. Trump has not unveiled any minutiae of his revolutionary political and economic agenda, the fact remains that by the virtue of his unnerving and challenging campaign the global mind is on a defensive mode. His precarious tilt towards resuscitating economic nationalism and a cloudburst of xenophobic venom seem to hinder the already tepid globalization process for the developing nations. One may see a modicum of retreat from his early promises but the world still await, in a state of contemplation, to see the tricks that new occupant of White House has up his sleeve.

Independent Economic Analyst, Writer and Editor. Contributes columns to different newspapers. He is a columnist for Oilprice.com, where he analyzes Crude Oil and markets. Also a sub-editor of an online business magazine and a Guest Editor in Modern Diplomacy. His interests range from Economic history to Classical literature.

Economy

Circular Economy: New rules will make EU the global front-runner in waste management and recycling

MD Staff

Published

on

EU Member States approved a set of ambitious measures to make EU waste legislation fit for the future, as part of the EU’s wider circular economy policy.

The new rules – based on Commission’s proposals part of the Circular Economy package presented in December 2015 – will help to prevent waste and, where this is not possible, significantly step up recycling of municipal and packaging waste. It will phase out landfilling and promote the use of economic instruments, such as Extended Producer Responsibility schemes. The new legislation strengthens the “waste hierarchy”, i.e. it requires Member States to take specific measures to prioritize prevention, re-use and recycling above landfilling and incineration, thus making the circular economy a reality.

Commissioner for Environment, Maritime Affairs and Fisheries, Karmenu Vella said: “The final approval of new EU waste rules by the Council marks an important moment for the circular economy in Europe. The new recycling and landfilling targets set a credible and ambitious path for better waste management in Europe. Our main task now is to ensure that the promises enshrined in this waste package are delivered on the ground. The Commission will do all it can to support Member States and make the new legislation deliver on the ground.”

The Commission had originally presented proposals for new waste rules in 2014, which were withdrawn and replaced by better designed, more circular and more ambitious proposals on December 2015 as part of the Circular Economy agenda of the Juncker Commission. These proposals were then adopted and are now part of the EU rule book.

The new rules adopted today represent the most modern waste legislation in the world, where the EU is leading by example for others to follow.

The details of the new waste rules:

Recycling targets for municipal waste

By 2025 By 2030 By 2035
55% 60% 65%

In addition, stricter rules for calculating recycling rates will help to better monitor real progress towards the circular economy.

New recycling targets for packaging waste

  By 2025 By 2030
All packaging 65% 70%
Plastic 50% 55%
Wood 25% 30%
Ferrous metals 70% 80%
Aluminium 50% 60%
Glass 70% 75%
Paper and cardboard 75% 85%

Separate collection

Building on the existing separate collection obligation for paper and cardboard, glass, metals and plastic, new separate collection rules will boost the quality of secondary raw materials and their uptake: hazardous household waste will have to be collected separately by 2022, bio-waste by 2023 and textiles by 2025.

Phasing out landfilling

Landfilling of waste makes no sense in a circular economy and can pollute water, soil and air. By 2035 the amount of municipal waste landfilled must be reduced to 10% or less of the total amount of municipal waste generated.

Incentives

The new legislation foresees more use of effective economic instruments and other measures in support of the waste hierarchy. Producers are given an important role in this transition by making them responsible for their products when they become waste. New requirements for extended producer responsibility schemes will lead to improving their performance and governance. In addition, mandatory extended producer responsibility schemes have to be established for all packaging by 2024.

Prevention

The new legislation will place a particular focus on waste prevention and introduce important objectives for food waste in the EU and halting marine litter to help achieve the UN Sustainable Development Goals in these areas.

Continue Reading

Economy

Strong labour relations key to reducing inequality and meeting challenges of a changing world of work

MD Staff

Published

on

Globalisation and rapid technological innovation have spurred unprecedented economic growth but not everyone has benefited. Unions and employers, together with governments, can play a major role in making growth more inclusive and helping workers and businesses face the challenges of a changing world of work. Good labour relations are a way to reduce inequalities in jobs and wages and better share prosperity, according to a new OECD-ILO report.

Building Trust in a Changing World of Work finds that trade union membership is declining in a majority of countries, while in several emerging economies large shares of the workforce are still in the informal economy. The share of employees whose job conditions and pay are regulated by collective bargaining varies greatly across sectors and countries, from less than 10% in Turkey to over 90% in Sweden. Coverage of collective bargaining have also seen a marked decline in many countries over the last decades, although in some countries more workers are covered today thanks to decisive policy reforms.

“Creating more and better jobs is key to achieving inclusive economic growth. At a time marked by increasing job insecurity, wage stagnation and new challenges from the digital revolution, constructive labour relations are more important than ever,” said OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurría, launching the report alongside Swedish Foreign Affairs Minister Margot Wallström, French Labour Minister Muriel Pénicaud, ITUC General Secretary Sharan Burrow and ILO Deputy Director-General for Field Operations & Partnerships, Moussa Oumarou.

The report is part of the Global Deal for Decent Work and Inclusive Growth, an initiative launched in 2016 by the Swedish Prime Minister Stefan Löfven and developed in cooperation with the OECD and the ILO. This multi-stakeholder partnership aims to foster social dialogue as a way of promoting better-quality jobs, fairer working conditions and helping spread the benefits of globalisation, in keeping with the Sustainable Development Goals. The Global Deal has around 90 partners representing governments, businesses, employers’ and workers’ organisations and other bodies who make voluntary commitments to contribute to a more effective dialogue and negotiated agreements on labour issues.

“We are convinced that the Global Deal for Decent Work and Inclusive Growth can  help to spur more and better social dialogue so we can provide all workers with strong voices, protection, fair working conditions and good levels of trust with employers,” Mr Gurría said.

“The new report shows that enhanced social dialogue can create opportunities for more inclusive labour markets and economic growth, better socio-economic outcomes and greater well-being for workers, improved performance for businesses and restored trust for governments,” said ILO Director-General Guy Ryder.

Some 2 billion workers around the world – more than half the global labour force – are in informal and mostly insecure jobs, according to the report, meaning they do not have formal contracts or social security. Annually there are 2.78 million work-related deaths and 374 million non-lethal work-related injuries and illnesses.

The report highlights the crucial role that unions and employers can play in shaping the future of work by jointly deciding what technologies to adopt and how, contributing to manage transitions for displaced workers, helping identify skills needs and developing education and training programs. The report also shows that when looking at the OECD Guidelines for Multinational Enterprises companies with a higher social score (a measure of their capacity to generate trust and loyalty among the workforce, customers and wider society) also have a stronger financial performance.

This report analyses the voluntary commitments made by Global Deal partners and gives examples of initiatives to improve labour relations that have been taken in different countries and sectors.

Continue Reading

Economy

How digital is your country? Europe needs Digital Single Market to boost its digital performance

MD Staff

Published

on

European Commission published the results of the 2018 Digital Economy and Society Index (DESI), a tool which monitors the performance of Member States in digital connectivity, digital skills online activity, the digitisation of businesses and digital public services.

According to it, the EU is getting more digital, but progress remains insufficient for Europe to catch up with global leaders and to reduce differences across Member States. This calls for a quick completion of the Digital Single Market and increased investments in digital economy and society.

Andrus Ansip, Vice-President for the Digital Single Market, said: “This is a shift, albeit small, in the right digital direction. As a whole, the EU is making progress but not yet enough. In the meantime, other countries and regions around the world are improving faster. This is why we should invest more in digital and also complete the Digital Single Market as soon as possible: to boost Europe’s digital performance, provide first-class connectivity, online public services and a thriving e-commerce sector.”

Mariya Gabriel, Commissioner for Digital Economy and Society, said: “We look forward to a rapid progress on major reforms such as the European Electronic Communications Code aiming at boosting investments in enhanced connectivity. This year’s Digital Economy and Society Index demonstrates that we must deploy further efforts to tackle lack of digital skills among our citizens. By integrating more digital technologies and equipping them with skills, we will further empower citizens, businesses and public administrations. This is the way to succeed the digital transformation of our societies.”

Over the past year, the EU continued to improve its digital performance and the gap between the most and the least digital countries slightly narrowed (from 36 points to 34 points). Denmark, Sweden, Finland and the Netherlands scored the highest ratings in DESI 2018 and are among the global leaders in digitalisation. They are followed by Luxembourg, Ireland, the UK, Belgium and Estonia. Ireland, Cyprus and Spain progressed the most (by more than 15 points) over the last four years. However, some other EU countries still have a long way to go and the EU as a whole needs to improve to be competitive on the global stage.

DESI 2018 shows:

Connectivity has improved, but is insufficient to address fast-growing needs

  • Ultrafast connectivity of at least 100 Mbps is available to 58% of households and the number of subscriptions is rapidly increasing. 15% of homes use ultrafast broadband: this is twice as high as just two years ago and five times higher than in 2013.
  • 80% of European homes are covered by fast broadband with at least 30 Megabits per second (Mbps) (76% last year) and a third (33%) of European households have a subscription (23% increase compared to last year, and 166% compared to 2013).

The number of mobile data subscriptions has increased by 57% since 2013 reach 90 subscriptions per 100 people in the EU. 4G mobile networks cover on average 91% of the EU population (84% last year).

Indicators show that the demand for fast and ultrafast broadband is rapidly increasing, and is expected to further increase in the future. The Commission proposed a reform of EU telecoms rules to meet Europeans’ growing connectivity needs and boost investments.

More and more Europeans use the internet to communicate

The highest increase in the use of internet services is related to telephone and video calls: almost half of Europeans (46%) use the internet to make calls, this is almost a 20% increase compared to last year and more than 40% increase compared to 2013. Other indicators show that 81% of Europeans now go online at least once a week (79% last year).

To increase trust in the online environment, new EU rules on data protection will enter into force on 25 May 2018.

The EU has more digital specialists than before but skills gaps remain

  • The EU improved very little in the number of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) graduates (19.1 graduates per 1000 people aged 20 to 29 years old in 2015, compared to 18.4. in 2013);
  • 43% of Europeans still do not have basic digital skills (44% last year).

Alongside the Digital Skills and Jobs Coalition, the Commission has launched the Digital Opportunity Traineeships to tackle the digital skills gap in Europe. The pilot initiative will provide digital traineeships for up to 6,000 students and recent graduates until 2020 in another EU country.

Businesses are more digital, e-commerce is growing slowly

While more and more companies send electronic invoices (18% compared to 10% in 2013) or use social media to engage with customers and partners (21% compared to 15% in 2013), the number of SMEs selling online has been stagnating over the past years (17%).

In order to boost e-commerce in the EU, the Commission has put forward a series of measures from more transparent parcel delivery prices to simpler VAT and digital contract rules. As of 3 December 2018, consumers and companies will be able to find the best deals online across the EU without being discriminated based on their nationality or residence.

Europeans use more public services online

58% of internet users submitting forms to their public administration used the online channel (52% in 2013).

  • 18% of people use online health services.

In April 2018, the Commission adopted initiatives on the re-use of public sector information and on eHealth that will significantly improve cross-border online public services in the EU.

Continue Reading

Latest

Newsletter

Trending

Copyright © 2018 Modern Diplomacy