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Violinist Tim Fain and Composers Concordance do it right with an all new concert in New York

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Greetings from New York City, and welcome to my column! Here, I write about new music and media, and the people who create the art. Check it out.

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On a warmish November night, I attended a packed new music event put together by Composers Concordance, violinist Tim Fain, and an influential cohort of cutting-edge composers. The concert, A House of Many Rooms, featuring violinist Tim Fain with pianist Timo Andres, took place on November 8, 2015 at (Le) Poisson Rouge, a downtown venue on Bleecker Street that boasts a beguiling, flickering red fish at the entrance and a reputation for fresh sound all its own.

TimFainStreetOn the program were compositions by Kevin Puts, Dan Cooper, Milica Paranosic, and Christopher Cerrone, along with the world premieres of Beirut is A House of Many Rooms, by Randall Woolf, and Natural, by Gene Pritsker. Most pieces were related to physical places.

Dan Cooper’s well-integrated El Planeta Rojo had the feel of an electro-acoustic score for animation. A sound world of mournful violin phrases hovering lazily over angular electronic grooves, echoing a distant, orderly universe, created a fine sense of what dreaming about Mars could actually sound like. Arches, by the Pulitzer Prize-winning composer Kevin Puts, provided a blissful playground for Tim Fain’s articulated bowing in the seemingly abstract Caprice-Aria scheme, while Milica Paranosic’s Al’ Airi Lepo Sviri, set to a poignant video by Carmen Kordas, brought about a progressive treatment of common, if all too easily appropriated, misconceptions about the role of the feminine in traditional cultures. A sense of pre-industrial pure was present in Gene Pritsker’s Natural, an electro-bucolic pairing of samples recorded in nature with bursts of analog electronics and violin lines. The accompanying visuals mimicking early video technology were created by the composer.

As an expat myself, my pulse quickened at the opening of Randall Woolf’s Beirut is A House of Many Rooms. The heavily romantic opening motives well supported the unabashedly romantic notions I harbor for Sarajevo, my birthplace. By weaving the sounds of the ‘oud, Lebanese singers, city noises and a solemn violin operating mostly in lower registers (as if culled from a Jerzy Grotowski play), Woolf achieved a moving tribute to the essence of “Beirut, the Paris of the Middle East”. His score, not unlike the city itself, cradles western and eastern cultural idioms, and many more besides. The sense of excitement forged through coexistence was deepened by an accompanying film expertly shot in Beirut by Mary Harron and John C. Walsh, one that reveals the nature of communal life reminiscent of Peter Greenaway’s work. This is impressive given that the film was made after the music was completed.

Winner of the 2015 Samuel Barber ‘Rome Prize’, Christopher Cerrone was represented by a crafty work that combined 1990s minimalist language with gestural pop in a sonata form. For this piece, Fain teamed up with Timo Andres who shone brightly at the piano with a crystalline sound and attractive dramatic timing.

Described by the Boston Globe as a “charismatic young violinist with a matinee idol profile, strong musical instincts, and first rate chops,” Tim Fain’s offerings that night confirmed the Globe’s judgment and then some. Fain is an extremely sensitive interpreter who, with an assured yet understated virtuosity, pulled the utmost from every score. He proved to be a charming host and showed impressive panache, even during a tech glitch which temporarily prevented the start of one piece. But most of all, Fain imbued the night with a sense of purpose and the need for contemporary composition –a feat hard to achieve in a town with over 250 concerts per night and where new music ensembles and soloists, and their audiences, seem to multiply overnight in every borough.

The funds for the event came from a number of arts foundations, including the New York State Council on the Arts, New Music USA, and private donors.

Connections ‘n Picks

An “enterprising new music organization” according to The New York Times, Composers Concordance presents over 15 concerts every season, attracting over eighty top musicians to perform, along with visual artists, technologists, choreographers, and filmmakers. The beginnings of the organization are tied to the vision of the composer and electronic music pioneer Otto Luening. Now in its 30th season, Composers Concordance is a hard-working endeavor through which many talented composers have a chance to be heard and many an innovative technological tool tried out. I pick Directors Gene Pritsker and Dan Cooper who co-curate the programs. I pick my fellow Associate Directors for the 2015-16 season Milica Paranosic, Peter Jarvis, and Melissa Grey. Many creations done for and by the organization are released through Composers Concordance Records, and distributed by Naxos. I pick the label for its innovative thinking and appetite for cultural change. I pick the NYC audience that came out in force and knew how to reward the artists. I pick Tim Fain for saying “yes.”

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Reflections, Intentions

The Poisson Rouge program illuminated the world’s many corners and offered a sense of hope for a contemporary music that reflects a glorious, multifarious and yet essentially undivided existence. This feeling of promise –now more of a rarity in a post-Paris world– is what interests me as a citizen and a creator; this promise inspires me to write, and create, what I do. With the world around us kicking like a wounded colt, the resolve to trust the possibility of the positive voices now multiplying, giving us a wiser version of ourselves through the arts, is a choice to be made. Reverse-engineering, please! For the audience on Nov. 8, this concert represented a solid opportunity to choose well. It also made plain that Tim Fain has the capacity to play a larger role outside of the concert hall if he chooses to do so.

Get in touch and let me know about what inspires you artistically in your corner of the globe. And, if all else fails, you can always like me on Facebook.

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Daisy Rockwell on translating

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To communicate effectively, one must learn as many languages as possible. And if it is not possible to do that, one must ideally try to use translations to draw deeper connections with individuals across borders of language. Translations are an important part of intercultural awareness and understanding. In Literature too, translations help to make texts more accessible globally as well as increase understanding about culture from a global standpoint. I came across Daisy Rockwell on book influencer pages on Instagram where they spoke about her award winning translations. Being a sucker for travel and understanding diverse cultures, I knew I had to talk to Daisy about her experiences with languages and translation.

Daisy Rockwell is an award-winning translator of Hindi and Urdu literature, and artist, living in the United States. One of her recent translation works – “Tomb of Sand” has been nominated and awarded several literary prizes. In this interview, we take a closer look at her translations works. 

What got you interested in translating Hindi and attracted you about the language? 

I started learning Hindi in college because I loved learning languages and wanted to learn something totally unfamiliar to me. In graduate school, my mentors, AK Ramanujan and Colin P Masica encouraged me to try my hand at translation.

In many Indian elite schools, Hindi is not preferred by students and parents alike. What are your thoughts on that?

English is the global lingua franca, so many people around the world are eager to master it. But the attraction to English is also a relic of colonialism–that sense of insecurity that Indian languages are somehow not good enough. It’s not true, of course! 

What is your favourite part of the book – ‘Tomb of Sand’? 

Tomb of Sand is so rich and varied that I have many favourite sections. I love the part when the son, Bade, perches in a tree full of crows and remembers his mother’s saris. I also love the episode of the Serious Son. But really, it’s hard to pick.

Why did you choose ‘Tomb of Sand’ to translate from Hindi to English? 

The Bangla translator Arunava Sinha approached me about the project, because Deborah Smith, founder of Tilted Axis Press in the UK, was keen to publish it. Arunava brought me and Geetanjali together.

How can we encourage more youth to speak and stay connected with local languages? 

Well that I don’t know! I notice that many people have started reading Tomb of Sand and the original Hindi, Ret Samadhi, side by side, and I love that. I wonder if dual language publications would help people get excited about local languages.

What are other books you are translating or plan to translate in the future? 

I am working on Channa, Krishna Sobti’s first novel that was never published until shortly before her death, and Rukogi Nahin, Radhika? by Usha Priyamvada.

What other languages intrigue you? How do you plan to further your interest in them professionally? 

I don’t know if I will ever learn another language well enough to translate it. But during the pandemic I have been having great fun learning Korean using Duolingo and other online language learning apps.

What are some of your favourite books that you recommend to our readers? 

I can’t resist recommending my own!  The Women’s Courtyard, by Khadija Mastur, and Falling Walls, by Upendranath Ashk, both translated by me.

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Namita Gokhale – The name behind Jaipur Literature Festival

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A woman who wears many hats and an inspiration for writers across India, Namita Gokhale carries a vibrant persona of enthusiasm for art and ideas. A busy woman indeed with multiple projects to manage and juggle, Gokhale is best known as co-founder of the infamous Jaipur Literature Fest which attracts writers, readers and aspiring authors from across the world. Truly putting Jaipur on the world map and attracting many travellers to the well-deserved pink city, well known for palaces, forts, royalty and inspiration alike, Gokhale has added a fresh charm of literature to the city over the years. Now an intellectual hub, a melting pot for writers, Jaipur owes many a great thanks and gratitude to Gokhale for the reputation the lit fest has earned over the years.

As an aspiring author myself, co-incidentally I found myself in Jaipur while I was on a call with Namita Gokhale. Fascinated to be in her company on call and privileged to have my ideas heard by her, I couldn’t help but reflect on how the Lit Fest has transformed over the years. In this short interview, Gokhale reflects light on the Jaipur Literature Festival (JLF), authors at the fest, her personal favourite books and ideas on literature. Having inspired the youth of India with her ideas and impact, she continues to be humble about her experiences. It is every aspiring writer’s dream in India to attend and speak at the Jaipur Literature Festival, and it is Namita Gokhale who stands behind fuelling the dreams and sparking higher creativity among the youth of India. Before we even start the interview, I want to say – Thank You.

What inspired you to start Jaipur Literature Fest? 

The Jaipur Literature Festival was set up by me and William Dalrymple, and so many others, in an effort to bring readers and writers from India and around the world to speak about their books and creative process. It was propelled and inspired by a love of literature. 

How are the speakers for the fest chosen each year? 

William and I draw up our short lists. Sanjoy Roy of Teamworks, the producers of the festival, shares his ideas and suggestions. Our diverse interests and perspectives provide the festival the 360 degree range and depth that gives it such a unique flavour and personality 

How was the fest alive and active during times like the pandemic? 

We began with a series of digital sessions titled ‘Brave New World’ – and added new sub-themes and editions, learning on the job as we went along. We have an enormous digital outreach, across continents and time bands, and our recent hybrid edition was a huge success both on line and on ground. 

How can literary fests reach more people in the comfort of their homes? 

Literary editions have already acquired the extra dimension of view-from-home …and they will become more immersive and participatory with the passage of time. 

What was the response at the fest like this year? 

The digital editions drew vast audiences. The on ground festival at Jaipur was a spectacular success and received an emotive response from writers and readers alike. Human contact is so vital to communication. 

With apps like Audible, what is the future of the written word? 

I believe in the future of the spoken word, which is such an intrinsic part of the narrative process. Audio brings the voice back to the word, adding an important sensory dimension to the text. 

What was your personal favourite read recently?

I loved reading ‘Tomb of Sand’ – Daisy Rockwell’s vibrant English translation of Geetanjali Shree’s brilliant Hindi novel ‘Ret Samadhi’. It truly deserved its place in the international Booker shortlist. 

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Indonesia’s opportunity to maximize cultural identity through Indonesian Style Muslim Fashion

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Indonesia is a country rich in cultural diversity, where the diversity of Indonesian culture is not only culture from the aspect of dance and music, but Indonesia is also a country rich in creativity in the field of industrial art, especially industrial fashion through Muslim fashion combined with clothing patterns that introduce Indonesian culture. This can be proven by Indonesia being targeted as the center of the global halal industry through Muslim fashion products which are potential commodities for the international market (Susilawati, 2021, #). Where the patterns given on the clothes are an Indonesian art that not only has values ​​in appearance, but batik also has beauty on the spiritual side which through the patterns formed in local pattern cloth, it also has deep philosophical meaning through its decoration. Some of the factors that influence the formation of the Indonesian style include geographical location, nature, regional livelihoods, beliefs, and customs in an area, as well as the surrounding natural conditions including flora and fauna. Indonesia’s excellence in the art of the Muslim fashion industry through Indonesian patterns can be an opportunity for Indonesia to be maximized. According to the Indonesian Stock Exchange channel, the Vice President of Indonesia, Ma’ruf Amin at the Road to Jakarta Muslim Fashion Week event in 2022, explained that Indonesian Muslim fashion currently reflects the cultural diversity of the archipelago (Mufrida, 2022). Indonesian Muslim clothing has its own uniqueness in the patterns that are in Muslim clothing.

 Where this Indonesian Muslim dress still follows the rules of Muslim fashion, but the clothes show that the style and uniqueness of Muslim clothing are different in each region of Indonesia. This shows that this cultural wealth provides a great opportunity for Indonesia to become the creator of Muslim fashion trends in the world. through Indonesia’s innovation in creating clothing motifs in Muslim fashion. The world of fashion has a huge potential to be able to move the community’s economy (Kawilarang, 2014). The creative resources and abundant cultural heritage, a large population rich in innovation can be a potential for Indonesia to become a world fashion center, especially for Muslim fashion. Because at this time the Muslim fashion world continues to develop with the emergence of many Hijabers communities so that there are many Muslim fashion festivals, bazaars, and Muslim shows in the world. This shows that Indonesia must maximize its potential in introducing the nation’s identity through the patterns that are in every Indonesian fashion, where these patterns can be an inspiration to the world through the beauty of Indonesian patterns that are displayed. To Improve Indonesian Muslim fashion requires a lot of involvement in participating to contribute to improving Muslim fashion trends. Not only a designer, in improving Indonesian Muslim fashion, also needs the involvement of other actors who can provide education, mentoring, capital, and marketing to introduce the importance of producing Indonesian fashion with an Indonesian style. Due to the absence of education, mentoring, capital, and marketing, people who are experts in fashion will reduce interest in producing Indonesian-style Muslim fashion, which they prefer to produce more modern clothes without highlighting Indonesian patterns on the clothes. In addition, overseas institutions, through Indonesian diaspora agencies abroad, participate in promoting Indonesian fashion. The promotion of Indonesian patterns through Muslim clothing, it can be an indirect Indonesian communication medium to convey the richness of Indonesian cultural identity through the patterns in every Muslim clothing that is produced. Improving and maximizing the Indonesian Muslim fashion industry sector, which is currently the world’s concern, it can be one of the contributors to the national economy, creating jobs, and building a culture-based national economic independence.

Because Indonesia is rich in cultural heritage, and this cultural heritage needs to be maintained so that Indonesia does not lose its original identity. This is because in the era of globalization the identity and characteristics of Indonesian culture are declining. Due to the many modern influences and leaving the Indonesian culture behind. Because the root of Indonesian identity is the cultural wealth that has been owned since the first. Therefore, by increasing the production of Indonesian-style Muslim fashion, it can help Indonesia so that Indonesian culture can continue to be seen and felt by many people through clothing. The existence of this Indonesian-style Muslim fashion, it can indirectly help the role of the state in creating a good image of the country abroad. Because the face-to-face strategy in conveying the image of Indonesia through international forums is not enough. However, other strategies are needed to create Indonesian public diplomacy as an indirect strategy for Indonesia by enhancing the image of Indonesia’s identity that is sustainable, and long-term. Through Muslim fashion, the Indonesian style can be a good choice that can contribute to promoting and introducing Indonesian identity not only in the country but abroad as well.

The existence of international community knowledge of Indonesian culture and interest in Indonesian-style Muslim fashion trends, not only has a positive impact on the Indonesian economy but also has a positive impact on the existence of Indonesian cultural heritage so that it can be recognized and become an Indonesian strategy for branding a country through the beauty of the Indonesian style in Muslim fashion which is promoted and introduced by the international community. Therefore, by continuing to improve Muslim fashion through Indonesian styles, this can be an opportunity for Indonesia that can be carried out consistently and can become an Indonesian strategy where this strategy will have a good impact on various aspects including the economic aspect, increasing the identity of a country. country, and create a good image of Indonesia. Which patterns are found in Indonesian Muslim fashion, not just ordinary patterns, but Indonesian patterns have their own meanings that come from various regions in Indonesia. Therefore, Indonesia is needed to maximize this opportunity to maintain a cultural heritage that can become an Indonesian identity abroad.

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