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22 years since occupation of Azerbaijan’s Aghdam district by Armenia

Dimitris Giannakopoulos

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Welcome to the Caspian Daily, where you will find the 10 most important things you need to know on Caspian Sea Region. We appreciate ideas, reports, news and interesting articles. Send along to Caspian[at]moderndiplomacy.eu or on Twitter: @DGiannakopoulos

122 years have passed since the invasion of Armenian armed forces in the Azerbaijan’s Aghdam district.Azerbaijan’s Aghdam district was occupied by the units of Armenian armed forces on July 23, 1993. 1154 sq m territory of Azerbaijan‘s Aghdam district went into the control of Armenia as a result of occupation. Azerbaijan controls only 22,6 percent of Aghdam with a population of 147,000. Armenians destroyed the historical monuments, cemeteries, hospitals, libraries, schools, offices and facilities in the occupied territory.

2Construction of East-West gas pipeline is going on rapidly, Turkmenistan’s Ministry of Oil and Gas Industry and Mineral Resources said July 23.Commissioning of this pipeline will allow to ensure the efficiency of maneuvering with the directions of gas export and increase the reliability of the domestic gas supply.Moreover, this gas pipeline will allow to deliver 30 billion cubic meters of commercial gas from the richest fields in the country’s east to the projected international gas pipeline systems which run from Turkmenistan’s west.It was earlier reported that Turkmenistan plans to complete the construction of this main gas pipeline in late 2015.

3The recent decision by Washington to continue deploying elements of missile defense systems in Europe even after the historic nuclear deal with Iran was reached, confirmed Russia’s “worst fears,” Russian envoy to the European Union Vladimir Chizhov said in an interview with the Rossiya 24 television channel. “Europe is an empty shell when it comes to the draft of the European missile defense system, because it is an exclusively US initiative… Now there is a reasonable question: if Iran is no longer a threat, even if neither a partner nor an enemy, then what’s the use of [missile defense system] construction? The US stance on the issue is notable and confirms our worst fears

4Iran is prepared for “win-win” economic ties with other countries, says the chief of staff of President Hassan Rouhani.Mohammad Nahavandian made the remarks at a meeting with Yves Rossier, the state secretary at the Swiss Federal Department of Foreign Affairs in Tehran on Wednesday.“At present, a lot of the Western countries have come to the conclusion that the artificial (and) unnecessary crisis of Iran’s nuclear program is a big obstacle for their benefit from the Islamic Republic of Iran’s high economic capacity,” Nahavandian said. He further noted the “cruel sanctions regime” against Tehran led to the “loss of financial transparency” in business transactions with Iran.

5EU wants Azerbaijan to enter Schengen area, Donald Tusk, President of the European Council President, said on July 22 during a joint press conference with Azerbaijani President Ilham Aliyev in Baku.Tusk said he discussed with the Azerbaijani president the issue of facilitating the visa regime, noting that the negotiations in this regard will be completed by the end of this year.

6Lukoil discusses resuming Iran oil project.Negotiations are currently continuing in Moscow following talks in Tehran on Lukoil’s resumption of a project to develop the Azar field in Iran’s Anaran block, the Mehr news agency reported. “The new round of NIOC’s negotiations with Lukoil has begun in Moscow which is expected to pave the way for the return of the Russian firm to the Azar field development project,” Mehr said. An official at the Iranian Ministry of Petroleum, Ali Mohammad Yar-Mohammadi, has said there were also plans to hold talks with several other Russian oil companies specializing in other fields.

7“Pyrrhic Sovereignty” – The Treasure of the Tengiz. “The Tengiz oil field is at the center of this economic dance, both in the 90s and today. Chevron’s entrance into the Western portion of Kazakhstan did not come without regional backlash. This, among other similar US corporate ventures, pushed Russia and Iran into a strategic partnership and created Russian-led legal debates around drilling rights and Caspian Sea boundaries for the better part of the decade” writes Evan Thomsen for Modern Diplomacy.

8Computers and Office Machinery in Russia Industrial Report. Slowing Russian economy results in declining shipments of computing equipment, driving down market value by 7% in 2013. Cheaper production such as tablets, nettops and all-in-one PCs among the best-selling products in Russia in 2013. Production of computers and office machinery in Russia grows 5% in 2013, stimulated by soaring exports to Belarus and Kazakhstan due to newly imposed duties on computing equipment imports to the Customs Union. [Euromonitor]

9Azeri state energy company SOCAR has resumed oil exports via Russia this month, SOCAR’s president said on Wednesday, after they were suspended for several weeks.”SOCAR resumed oil shipments through the Baku-Novorossiisk pipeline this month, which were halted in the beginning of June,” Rovnag Abdullayev told reporters.It’s not immediately clear why oil flows were halted.Azerbaijan’s SOCAR shipped 678,046 tonnes of oil via Russia in the first half of 2015, up from 508,222 tonnes in the same period last year.

10Azerbaijan hosts the International Summer School entitled “Multiculturalism as lifestyle in Azerbaijan: Learn, Explore, Share“.The project was jointly organized by Baku International Multiculturalism Centre, “Knowledge” Foundation under the Azerbaijani President and Baku Slavic University.The summer school, which is to be attended by the local and foreign students who completed the interdisciplinary course “Azerbaijani multiculturalism” during the spring semester of the current year, as well as influential figures of science, will be held from July 21 to August 1.

Journalist, specialized in Middle East, Russia & FSU, Terrorism and Security issues. Founder and Editor-in-chief of the Modern Diplomacy magazine. follow @DGiannakopoulos

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Multilateralism: The only path to address the world’s troubles

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Secretary-General António Guterres (center) meets with Rohingya refugees in Cox’s Bazaar, Bangladesh. Photo: UNFPA Bangladesh/Allison Joyce

As the world’s problems grow, multilateralism represents to best path to meet the challenges that lie ahead, said United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres on Tuesday, launching his annual report.

The Report of the Secretary-General on the Work of the Organization  for 2018, also tracks the progress made over the last year in maintaining peace and security, protecting human rights, and promoting sustainable development.

“I started my tenure calling for 2017 to be a year of peace, yet peace remains elusive,” said the UN chief in the report’s introduction, noting that since January last year “conflicts have deepened, with grave violations of human rights and humanitarian law; inequality has risen, intolerance has spread, discrimination against women remains entrenched and the impacts of climate change continue to accelerate.”

“We need unity and courage in setting the world on track towards a better future,” stressed Mr. Guterres, crediting the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) for generating coordinated efforts by Member States and civil society to “alleviate poverty and build peaceful, prosperous and inclusive societies.”

Wide-ranging reform

The most comprehensive reform of the UN development system in decades already underway, led by Mr. Guterres and his deputy, Amina Mohammed, aims to strengthen the Organization’s capacity to support Member States in achieving the 17 SDGs.

While the report points to gains, such as increased labour productivity, access to electricity and strengthened internet governance, it also illustrates that progress has been uneven and too slow to meet the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Goals within the given time frame.

For example, in 2015, three out of 10 people did not have access to safe drinking water, and  60 per cent lacked safe sanitation. Moreover conflicts, disasters and climate change are also adversely affecting populations.

The report underlines the importance of building stronger multilateral partnerships with Member States; regional and international organizations; and civil society; to “find solutions to global problems that no nation alone can resolve.”

Although the 2018 High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development of 2018 reflected some positive initiatives, it also showed the urgent need to step up efforts in areas such as energy cooperation, water and terrestrial ecosystems.

According to the report, “partnerships are key to achieving the SDGs” – and as of June, 3,834 partnerships had been registered with the Partnerships for the SDGs online platform from different sectors across all the 17 goals.

With regard to technology, last October a joint meeting of the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) and the Second Committee welcomed Sophia, the first robot to sit on a UN panel. This gave a glimpse into the advances being made in the realm of Artificial Intelligence.

Turning to young people, UN Youth Envoy, Jayathma Wickramanayake, of Sri Lanka, is continuously advocating for their needs and rights, including in decision-making processes at all levels, and in strengthening the UN system’s coordination on delivering for youth, and with their increased participation.

The UN report also spoke to the growing scale, complexity and impact of global migration. In July, the General Assembly agreed a Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration, which will be presented for adoption in December at an Intergovernmental Conference in Morocco.

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Youth Calls for Action to Build the Workforce of the Future

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Special Senior Advisor to the ADB President Mr. Ayumi Konishi (4th from right) on behalf of ADB signs the Incheon Youth Declaration on The Future of Work at the 6th Asian Youth Forum. Photo: ADB

Over 400 youth representatives from Asia and the Pacific launched the Incheon Youth Declaration on the Future of Work, which calls upon the international community to invest in more inclusive, large-scale, and market-relevant solutions for youth employment and entrepreneurship.

The declaration, launched during the 6th Asian Youth Forum (AYF6) and coinciding with the celebration of the International Youth Day on 12 August, reflects the shared vision, commitments, and calls to action of the youth to inform future policy strategies and project initiatives to promote decent work. AYF6, with the theme “Building the workforce of the future,” was organized by the Asian Development Bank (ADB), Incheon Metropolitan City, Incheon Tourism Organization, Plan International, and AIESEC.

“We at ADB commit to continue investing in youth through our operations, including through our work in education, and in many other sectors we are supporting. We appreciate that the declaration today covers various issues including partnerships, entrepreneurship, as well as environment,” said Special Senior Advisor to the ADB President Mr. Ayumi Konishi, who also emphasized that the declaration will help guide ADB in advancing efforts to invest in education and empowering youth as key development partners in the region.

“Incheon will further boost its efforts to support youth employment and startups through various policies, such as the establishment of youth policy organization, cluster for startup incubators, funds, and forum for startups,” said Vice Mayor of Incheon Metropolitan City Mr. Jong Sik Heo. Acting President of the Incheon Tourism Organization Mr. Yong Sik Lee also attended the event.

The declaration highlights several key issues affecting youth employment and the future of work and what several stakeholders including governments, private sector, civil society, multilateral institutions, academe, and the youth themselves can do to address them. These issues include ensuring decent work and inclusion; transitioning from education and training to work; fostering youth entrepreneurship; and preparing for jobs of the future.

Youth delegates from 20 developing member countries of ADB have expressed their commitment in carrying out the efforts outlined in the declaration. Ms. Priscilla Caluag, a delegate from the Philippines, shared that the Asian Youth Forum has given her and other young people from the region a unique opportunity to act in ways beyond their own personal interests but ultimately for the betterment of society.

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Are Real Estate CEOs missing out on the technology opportunity?

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In its 21st annual survey of CEOs from around the world PwC found that technology does not top the agenda for real estate CEOs either as a threat or an opportunity.

Only 17% of real estate CEOs cite cyber threats as a danger to their growth prospects, compared with 40% of all CEOs who took part in the survey.  While even fewer, only 10% of real estate CEOs, view the speed of technological change as a threat to their organisations compared with 38% of all CEOs.

Looking at opportunities only 20% of real estate CEOs said they clearly understood how robotics and artificial intelligence can improve customer services compared with 47% of all CEOs.

Real estate also appears to be a bit behind the curve when it comes to future talent with  just 43% of real estate CEOs rethinking their human resources function to attract digital talent compared with 60% of CEOs overall.

“For most of its history, the capital-intensive real estate industry has had good reason to be slow moving and conservative. But times are changing.  Technology, urbanisation and social changes are transforming how we live, work and play and therefore how we use real estate, meaning business leaders need to be bold and innovative if they will continue to succeed”, said Craig Hughes, global real estate leader, PwC.

“Our survey results suggest that real estate CEOs have some way to go if they are to meet digital disruption head on and reap the benefits.  In our view, this process should start through building a more diverse group of talent, including data scientists and behavioural experts, to work alongside their existing talent and build the real estate champions of tomorrow.”

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