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Climate change part of systemic failure: Democracy, Equality, Survival

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How 28th March Started Changing Everything

We’re living in a broken system: the war on terror, the Great Recession, the climate crisis and a definition of democracy no one believes in anymore. And our generation is living at the tipping point of planetary history.

Rainforests and farmlands are being reduced to desert and acid rains from the sky. Every hour, three species of animal become extinct. Our food, water and air are being polluted. Over the past 40 years, Co2 emissions have skyrocketed by 80% and natural disasters increased fivefold. Of the last 13 years, 12 have been the hottest on record.

Leading scientists are warning that without radical change, entire islands and major cities will be swallowed by the sea while mega-storms, droughts and pollution will make great swathes of the earth uninhabitable, triggering resource wars and a global refugee crisis. Of course this changes everything. The question is how.

“It’s a civilisational wakeup-call. A powerful message, spoken in the language of fires, floods, droughts and extinctions, telling us that we need an entirely new economic model and a new way of sharing this planet.” – Naomi Klein

That’s the clarion call at the heart of Naomi Klein’s new book, This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate. It’s also the message that brought a thousand people together with campaigners and academics for a mass participatory gathering last weekend to discuss some of the most urgent questions facing our generation: about the crises we face; what a fair and sustainable alternative might look like; and what kind of movement it will take to get us there.

The event, which took its name from the book, was packed out. It attracted a young and diverse crowd mostly ‘new to politics’ and an international audience for the livestream. People are already planning their own This Changes Everything events in Bristol, Brighton, Nottingham as well as France, Germany and the USA.

Appearing via skype at the beginning of the day, Naomi summed up her argument: “We’re on the road to catastrophic levels of warming. It isn’t too late to get off that road… to do that we have to change everything about our corrupt political system and our profit-driven economic system… our leaders aren’t going to be the ones to grab the wheel and swerve because they’re embedded in that logic, they’re products of it, and so it’s going to have to be social movements that lead from below… the work you guys are doing is why I wrote the book.”

For many of us, September’s People’s Climate March was a catalyst. The sound of 40,000 pairs of feet hitting the streets in London while 400,000 joined the historic march in New York and actions took place in over 160 other countries around the world shattered any notion that the climate movement couldn’t mobilise, that people didn’t care or that it was too late to act.

The Copenhagen Summit’s failure to change anything had renewed commitment to the idea that this fundamental change we were calling for would have to be fought for and won from below; that those who could force the system to change were those disillusioned and exploited by it – not, as some environmentalists would have it, by cupping our hands for concessions from those at the top, who have everything to gain from perpetuating business as usual.

This Changes Everything was organised by a growing, independent network of activists. It brought leading figures from organisations like Friends of the Earth, War on Want and the Green Party around a table with students and activists from groups like Occupy, Join the Dots and Brick Lane Debates. That diversity was echoed on the day itself with a symphony of radical voices: leading environmentalists in Asia and Africa spoke with radical economists and campaigners. The closing session heard from Russell Brand and Francesca Martinez alongside leading voices from the climate justice and trade union movement.

As Mark Sertwotka, General Secretary of the trade union PCS told the assembly: “We will not fall for the lie that says if you are pro environmental issues you are against the interests of workers. If we all unite, if we get on each other’s demonstrations, we can rock them to their core. That’s what my union wants to see.” In the UK, the absence of organised labour on the People’s Climate March was a gaping hole. Also felt was an absence of meaningful political content. There were the people – but where were their demands? We all wanted to save the planet, but how could we actually do it? What was the vision? Who were we holding responsible? In whom should we put our faith? These were the great unanswered questions This Changes Everything set out to ask.

On 28th March the answer was deafening. In the morning a mass, interactive assembly heard from leading progressive voices about the crisis we face and visions of how a fairer, more sustainable and democratic economy could work for both people and planet. In the afternoon, everyone joined in with participatory workshops to share ideas about how we could meet a joined-up crisis with a joined-up movement. In the workshops people talked honestly about the difficulties of uniting different struggles and identified the key strategic fights where we can come together and win. During the final session, key ideas from all the workshops were collated into a single consensus that was presented to everyone and met with applause.

The conclusion, in a nutshell, was this: climate change changes everything, but it’s part of a deeper crisis of the system. And the solution isn’t just about Co2 – it’s about justice, not just for the planet but for people here and across the world who were losing their jobs or their land for the same reason they were losing clean water and clean air, losing access to welfare, healthcare and education; living in fractured communities, working longer for less and feeling evermore disempowered: a system that divides and conquers, cultivates violence, exploits the whole world and puts profit first every single time we let it.

More than anything, that’s what 28th March was about. People weren’t debating the science of climate change. They weren’t debating whether war, inequality or austerity was part of the problem. 28th March was about taking the next step – trying to understand how all these things are linked, to sketch a vision for a common solution and start talking about how we come together to create it.

Now, on the basis of the consensus we reached together, groups of people are coming together throughout London, the UK and beyond. They’ll be working on a broad spectrum of fronts: from media and education to protest and direct action, on a range of related issues from fracking, food sovereignty and fuel poverty to green social housing and democracy in the workplace. For many this is the first time they’ve tried to change anything. For others we hope to create new spaces for joined-up action and mutual support for all the great work already being done in the movement. The door is open for a whole new layer of people to get involved and take ownership of what we’re building.

There is one thing we have in common. We know that justice for people and planet will be won together, or not at all. The democracy movement has become part of the struggle to survive. We know progressive politics has ecology at its heart and that the climate movement needs the courage to get radical, now.

 

If you want to find out more, you can check out our website, like us on Facebook and follow @TCEuk on Twitter. You can also drop us an email at thischangeseverything2015(at)gmail.com.

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Green Planet

How Islam can represent a model for environmental stewardship

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The world, not just the UN, is waking up to the power of faith-based organizations (FBOs). How can Islam, and other faiths, contribute to solutions to sustainability and mitigate climate change risks?

Odeh Al-Jayyousi, Professor and head of innovation at Arabian Gulf University in Bahrain, scholar in sustainable innovation and a member of UN Global Scientific Advisory Panel, for UN Environment’s Global Environment Outlook 6 (GEO6), argues that Islamic worldview represents a unique model for a transition to sustainable development by focusing on justice, degrowth and harmony between human and nature.

He commented that Islam views the environmental challenges as an indicator for a moral and ethical crisis. Looking at the creation of human, Earth, and cosmos as signs of the Creator (Kitab Manthoor) is a key in Islamic values.

Prof. Al-Jayyousi elaborated that Islamic worldview defines a good life (Hayat Tayebah) living lightly on Earth (Zohd) and caring for both people and nature. Islamic discourse offers a sense of hope and optimism about the possibility of attaining harmony between human and nature. Earth will find a balance if humans rethink their lifestyles and mindsets as stated in the Quran:

Corruption has appeared in both land and sea
Because of what people’s own hands have brought
So that they may taste something of what they have done
So that hopefully they will turn back
Qur’an 30: 41

Professor Al-Jayyousi calls to revive the holistic view of Islam which is founded on the notion of harmony and “natural state” (fitra) and in respecting balance (mizan) and proportion (mikdar) in the systems of the universe. These notions provide an ethical dimension and a mandate for all humans to respect nature and all forms of life.

Hence, the overcoming environmental crisis and mitigating the impact of climate change, from an Islamic perspective is underpinned by defining the role of humans as trustees and stewards (khalifah). This balance has been disturbed because to human choices which result in overconsumption, overexploitation and overuse of resources.

Islamic values call to save integrity and to protect the diversity of all forms of life. Professor Al-Jayyousi commented that the ecological crisis is linked to human ethics and values. Human actions are responsible for the global ecological crisis. “Reflecting on the main environmental problems, such as the destruction of natural habitats, loss of biodiversity, climate change, and erosion of soil, we see that all are triggered by human greed and ignorance. Human responsibility is to save and protect livelihood and ecosystem services to ensure a sustainable civilization learning from and reflecting on the fate of past civilizations”, said Professor Al-Jayyousi.

He cited a verse from the Holy Book, Quran, “Every living thing is in a state of worship”. He commented that when one hurts a bird or a plant, he/she is silencing a community of worshippers. To celebrate the symphony of life, all humans need to celebrate and protect biological and cultural diversity.

Islamic worldview calls to make a transition to a sustainable society and economy by adopting responsible development and respecting sustainability principles. This change requires a shift in norms and practices. Religion can become a powerful part of the solution if humans embody a holistic spiritual view towards mankind, earth and cosmos.

In 2015 in Istanbul, the Muslim world in its Islamic declaration for climate change set the framework for an ethical code of conduct to build a low-emission climate resilient future.

Al-Jayyousi aspires to see a new Islamic discourse that emphasizes and links faith, reason and empathy to ensure an ecological insight (Baseera). He calls to rethink educational systems that neglected the beauty and majesty of nature and the cosmos.

“The extinction of species around us which are simply communities like us (Ummam Amthalokom) may extend to humankind unless we change our worldviews and development models”, warns Prof. Al-Jayyousi.  He calls to revive the concept of Green Endowment Fund (Waqf) to support a transition to sustainable economy by promoting innovation (ijtihad)  inspired by nature and culture.

He proposed a conceptual model with three domains to address climate change and sustainability:

  • Green activism (Jihad)
  • Green innovation (Ijtihad)
  • Green lifestyle (Zohd).

He refers to this as a Green JIZ model, which represents an Islamic response to climate change embodying the concept of de-growth.

“Conflict and poor governance are putting the Middle East and North Africa at jeopardy” points out Prof. Al-Jayyousi. He calls for a sustainable region that is founded on human and environmental justice. An optimist, Prof. Al-Jayyousi is inspired by prophet Mohammed saying “If it is the Last day of life and you have a small plant, make sure you plant it”.

First published in UN Environment

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Green Planet

Greening Vietnam’s tea industry

MD Staff

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“We’ve stopped using herbicides completely”: Thanh is one of thousands of Vietnamese tea farmers who have embraced sustainable farming. Photo by UN Environment / Lisa Murray

How sustainable farming is turning the tables for Vietnamese tea growers

The act of drinking tea is a key part of many of Vietnam’s social rituals and interactions. As a commodity, tea is also one of the country’s most important exports. But in recent years, unpredictable, heavy downpours and overuse of agrochemicals have led to poor quality crops, low yields and a decline in the reputation of Vietnamese tea within the global export market.

But now, with the help of UN Environment and partners, Vietnamese tea growers have begun to turn the situation around, resulting in an impressive adoption of sustainable farming techniques and a 30 percent increase in average income in only two years.

Thanh has been growing tea since 1983. Her two children grew up among the tea bushes. Tea has always been Thanh’s primary income source and the six cyclical harvests she reaps throughout the year have become integral to the rhythms of family life. Standing amidst the perfectly straight rows of tea plants covering her two-hectare plantation, she explains the devastating effects of heavy rainfall on her smallholding in past years.

Climate change has led to increased heavy rainfall and flooding in this region of northern Vietnam; those farmers who are unlucky enough to grow on steep gradients without sufficient tree cover have had to cope with frequent landslides and severe crop damage due to soil erosion. Like most other tea farmers in her commune, Thanh’s previous reliance on herbicides and pesticides meant her crops fell short of international trading standards.Her heavy chemical use was also damaging the  soil  she and her family depend on – killing off beneficial organisms along with pests, resulting in reduced organic matter and poor soil drainage capacity. These poor natural resource management techniques contributed to the widespread water contamination threatening livelihoods throughout Vietnam’s Central and Northern Highlands.

The scale of this land degradation challenge and its impact on tea farmers around Asia prompted UN Environment to collaborate with The Rainforest Alliance to establish the Sustainable Tea Production Landscapes project. Since 2014, the Global Environment Facility-funded initiative has been working across five of Asia’s best-known tea-producing regions – Darjeeling and Assam (India), Yunnan (China), lowland Sri Lanka and Vietnam – educating smallholder farmers and large estate tea growers on the dangers of land degradation and training them in sustainable farming and land management techniques.

While the project’s environmental aims are to protect and restore soil fertility, enhance carbon sequestration and conserve the biodiversity found in tea production landscapes, it also aims to secure farmers’ livelihoods by reducing their vulnerability to climate-related crop failure – an aim that is already bearing fruit.

Since she began implementing sustainable farming techniques after receiving training from the project, Thanh’s family income has doubled, and the nearby tea factory is willing to pay more for her crops due to their improved quality.

“We’ve stopped using herbicides completely,” she says, explaining how she now uses organic methods to control pests and boost the soil’s nutrients. “I’ve learnt to apply mulch and grow hedges, so that natural ecosystems can work against pests; we also intercrop tea with legumes, which replenish and fix the nitrogen into the soil.”

Thanh’s enthusiasm has also made her an excellent peer educator, and she has trained around 70 other tea growers in sustainable farming techniques to date. According to Rikolto, the project’s implementing partner in Vietnam, over 3,000 stakeholders from tea-producing communities, grower cooperatives and local government in Yen Bai, Lai Chau and Thai Nguyen provinces have been trained in alternatives to agrochemicals and effective soil management. Rikolto have used the Farmer Field School methodology, which focuses on learning through experience, capitalising on local knowledge and empowering growers to take ownership of land and soil issues. The curriculum also emphasises the importance of using compost and green manure, and of planting shade trees to keep temperature and moisture levels constant.

Today, Thanh’s fields are a lush, rich green. But it wasn’t always this way.

“Before I joined the project. The tea plants were small and red in colour due to malnutrition. Now, they look healthy because they are under the shade and getting what they need,” she says with a grin. “My yield has doubled!”

UN Environment

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Green Planet

The Plight of Birds and Human Responsibility in the Sixth Mass Extinction

Dr. Arshad M. Khan

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As birds become fewer, wildflowers vanish, butterflies disappear, and animals in the wild are threatened, extinction and a grim future haunts.  How often does Rumi write about birdsong … there is a reason.  Nature revives the spirit.

World Environment Day has come and gone.  It was June 5th.  A UN outreach program hosted by a different country each year, it is designed to draw attention to the country’s environmental challenges and to offer it support.  This year the host is India and the theme is beating plastic pollution.  But plastics are not just a blight on the landscape, they are in the seas destroying coral and the species it shelters, painfully killing whales and other creatures … including birds.

Yet, it is far from the only cause of bird distress and their sharply declining numbers.  One example comes from the Arctic, where receding ice has taken with it the nutritious cod, which favor cold waters, and has endangered the black guillemot now forced to feed chicks on the bony and difficult-to-digest fourhorn sculpin.

When the EU commissioned a State of Nature report, they expected bad news but not quite as dire a result.  Prepared by the European Environment Agency and sourced from EU-wide data, it found one in three bird species threatened and only a little over half secure.  It also drew a bleak picture of European habitats finding over half of those studied to be unfavorable.  Habitat loss, pesticides particularly neonicotinoids, even excessive hunting, notably in southern Europe, are all to blame.

Earlier, a comprehensive study conducted by University of Exeter (UK) professor Richard Inger and colleagues had analyzed avian biomass across 25 countries over 30 years.  Using data from Birdlife International and the Pan-European Common Bird Monitoring Scheme, they discovered a surprisingly large and troubling loss:  from 1980 to 2009 the estimated total avian population had declined by 421 million birds.

Meanwhile, new research in the US with far-reaching consequences places blame squarely on human action.  It examines avian consequences of noise pollution.  If certain constant noises irritate us — think of road repair and a pneumatic drill — then birds are no exception.  Noise from oil and gas operations is stressing out birds and harming reproduction.  They exhibit signs of chronic stress, lay fewer eggs or fewer eggs hatch, and nestling growth is stunted.

So reports a study by Nathan Kleist and colleagues in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (unfortunately not available to the general public without a fee).  The authors study three species of cavity nesting birds (the ash-throated flycatcher, the mountain bluebird and the western bluebird) breeding near oil and gas operations — located on Bureau of Land Management property in New Mexico’s San Juan Basin .

The researchers placed 240 nest boxes on 12 pairs of sites, close to and at varying distances from the drilling pads where loud compressors operated non-stop.  The team took blood samples of adult females and nestlings from all the nest boxes for three years.  They examined nestling body size and feather length and found them to be less well developed in both noisy and lower noise areas, suggesting any level of irritating noise is disruptive.

Baseline levels of a key stress hormone, corticosterone, showed high stress in birds nesting closest to the noise.  In addition, when subjected to a test of being held for 10 minutes, nestlings in noisy areas produced significantly greater stress hormones than those in quiet areas.

It also turned out that the western bluebird was the only species willing to nest in the sites closest to the compressors.  Such behavior had cultivated a belief it was immune to noise.  Not so, the study results revealed.

That environmental stress is increased by noise pollution, and that it degrades avian reproductive success is thus the conclusive message of this study.  With background noise constantly increasing in the US, even protected areas are no longer immune.  On the face of it, there is also the distinct possibility other species could also be affected.

If the anthropocene is our age, it is also our look in the mirror to see what the human footprint has wrought, even if unwittingly.  Global warming, extreme weather events becoming more severe, plastic pollution and stressed wildlife, record extinctions, insect declines … all appear to be portents of an impaired future warning humans repeatedly of urgency.  The sixth mass extinction is underway but it will take centuries if not thousands of years, and man can help by alleviating global warming and increasing preservation efforts.  Clearly related to CO2 levels, global warming has been the culprit in the previous five.  CO2 levels are already in excess of 0.04 percent perilously close to the 0.05 percent calculated to melt icecaps through temperature rise causing serious flooding of coastal areas.

Are leaders and decision-makers listening?

Authors note:  This article appeared originally on Counterpunch.org

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