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ISIS death cult brides and Misrad Omerovic aka “Ebu Tejma”

Alexander Athos

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Misrad was born in Tutin Serbia(1) to Muslim parents. In his twenties he became radicalized by Wahhabi (Vehabije) Imams in Saudi funded mosques that have been proliferating throughout Bosnia and the Balkans. (2) He got a Saudi ‘scholarship’ to be further radicalized by Wahhabi fanatics in Mecca KSA between 2002 and 2008. He then went to a Chechen run terrorist ‘finishing’ school in Vienna to study martial arts and weapons training.

Misrad is part of a Wahhabi Salafi ideologue who preaches hatred against Shia, Sufi, Christians and the West in social media. (3)He is also part of a local terror cell based at the Wahhabi dominated Altun Alem mosque in the Viennese district of Meidling (Austria). (4) Vienna is a well-known hub of global Jihadist terrorism, mainly because of Bosnian Muslim activity funded by Saudi Arabia. Misrad does not earn a living. He is on welfare (like so many hate preachers living in the West). Misrad has a pregnant wife and five children, all of whom live on welfare of the Austrian government.

Unlike the Australian PM who called the recent Sydney Siege attack by a Wahhabi madman Man Haron Monis (5) as ‘politically’ motivated, the Austrian authorities are more correct in calling Wahhabi actions of that type ‘religiously motivated’ extremism and terrorism.
Sabina Selimovic and Samra Kesinovic  two Bosnian girls (aged only 14 and 16 when they left Austria) who were refugees in Austria and then settled in Austria were lured to their deaths in Syria by Wahhabi propaganda mouthed by Bosnian Ebu Tejma aka Misrad on his You Tube channel. Misrad as Imama of the Altun Alem mosque asked Muslims in the congregation about whether they had “daughters of marriageable age, presumably to entice and reward the jihadists joining the fight under the black banner of Isis” (6).

“Salafism is the fastest-growing Islamic movement in the world. It is rooted in the 19th century where it emerged as a way of combating the spread of European ideas and values. But in recent years, it has come to be associated with the jihad of extremist groups that advocate the killing of innocent civilians. Security services recorded a constant stream of Salafist preachers, often accompanied by Mujahedin fighters travelling up from Bosnia and Herzegovina, to the mosque and the imam has been appearing in online videos revealing that it is every Muslim’s duty to join jihad if an Islamic state is under attack from non-believers. It is not even necessary to ask parents for permission, because even that normally essential parental duty takes second place to the duty to fight.” (7)

When they ran away to join ISIS in Syria, Sabina and Samara left a note, telling their parents: “Don’t look for us. We will serve Allah – and we will die for him.” (8)
They became the poster girls for ISIS on the internet.

In Syria the girls had to wear a full black niqab and were used as virtual sex slaves for ISIS fighters in an ISIS brothel run by British Wahhabi women pimps in the ISIS ‘capital’ Raqqua Syria before becoming pregnant. They were reported to have regrated their decision and wanted to come home to Austria but it was too late. According to UN official David Scharia one girl has recently been reported as having been killed and the other ‘disappeared’ in Syria. The exact circumstances are not known. (9)

33 year old Misrad was arrested on 28 November 2014 with 12 other Wahhabi Salafi’s in Vienna on terrorism charges. (10)
“Austria has been concerned for years over fears that the country was becoming a hub for terrorist activities after inviting thousands of Muslim refugees into the country during the breakup of the former Yugoslavia.” (11)

The Austrian police and national security officers (WEGA) like their counterparts in other countries such as Australia (12) have been conducting mass nationwide raids to weed out Wahhabi extremists who have been funding ISIS and luring hundreds of young Muslims aged between 15 and 30 either as Wahhabi concubines to ISIS fighters or to their death as cannon fodder in Syria and Iraq. There are estimated to be 150 Austrian citizens who have gone to Syria and Iraq to join ISIS fighting or sex brigades.

The Austrian anti-terror sweeps (13) were the culmination of a 2 year investigation and involved 900 police and intelligence operatives in which they allegedly monitored phone calls between Misrad and the ISIS leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi. The nationwide raids were the biggest in Austria since WWII. Many centres of Wahhabi extremism were uncovered in mosques, so called ‘prayer rooms’, private homes of Wahhabi’s and Islamic Centres in key Austrian cities like Graz, Linz and Vienna.(14) The raids found proof of recruitment for ISIS, terrorist propaganda, cash and other terrorist paraphernalia. 13 arrests were made.

As a result of the Wahhabi terror grooming, funding and propaganda campaigns by the likes of Misrad, the Austrian Parliament on 10 December 2014 passed wide sweeping Anti-Terror laws (15)that included banning ISIS and AL Qaeda flags as terror symbols and takes away Austrian citizenship from Austrian Muslims who go to Syria to join ISIS. These laws mirror similar laws passed in Germany on 5 September 2014 that were based on the  1960 anti-Fascism laws called Abzeichengesetz (Badge Law)– which outlaws Nazi symbols, flags, uniforms and insignia. Other European countries like Denmark are said to be following suit.(16)

“Austria’s government has announced a new ‘counselling centre for extremism’ and a deradicalization hotline (0800 2020 44), intended to help young Muslims living in Austria from falling under the influence of jihadist recruiters and extremists.” (17)
________________________________________
 
1.http://www.b92.net/eng/news/crimes.php?yyyy=2011&mm=10&dd=29&nav_id=77084 Tutin (is both a town and municipality of Serbia). Along with Gornja Maoca andSouth-West Sandzak region have long been a hotbed for Wahhabi (aka Jihadist) extremism in Serbia. Since 2008 the growth of Wahhabi extremism in Bosnia has spread throughout the Balkans including Serbia and into Austria. file:///C:/Users/Media-Server/Documents/Articles%20by%20Athos/08(06)KM.pdf. The main instigator of the spread of Wahhabism from Bosnia into Serbia was the former Bosnian Grand Mufti Mustafa Ceric (although he denies this) . He has a working relationship in that regard with the Mufti of Sandzak in Serbia, Muamer Zukoric and Chechen Wahhabists who promote Jihad. Serbian authorities have identified 500 Islamic terror leaders that operate inside Serbia whose activities include drug smuggling, human trafficking and recruiting locally to send Jihad fighters to Syrian war. http://serbianna.com/blogs/bozinovich/archives/1972 In 2011 17 Wahhabi terrorists, including Mevlid Jasarevic were arrested following an attack on the US embassy in the Bosnian capital Sarajevo. http://www.thejournal.ie/17-arrested-over-terrorist-attack-in-sarajevo-266870-Oct2011/ The Wahhabis (Vehabije) first started appearing in the Balkans in 1997 http://www.islamicpluralism.org/493/euro-islam.
2.http://www.defenddemocracy.org/content/uploads/documents/facebook_fatwa_low_res_2.pdf
3.http://www.defenddemocracy.org/content/uploads/documents/facebook_fatwa_low_res_2.pdf “the (Saudi) monarchy relies on the descendants of Muhammad ibn Abdul Wahhab (eighteenth century), the Al al-Sheikh lineage, who preach the ascetic Salafi version of Islam indigenous to Saudi Arabia, now known as Wahhabism. Thus, the Al al-Sheikh and other prominent religious families provide the House of Saud with religious authority, which bolsters its credibility at home and defends it from religious detractors abroad…. In 1962, ibn Saud’s son, Faisal, who became king in 19 6 4, founded the Muslim World League (MWL) to facilitate the global propagation of Wahhabism. Faisal intended the MWL to challenge Shi’a, Sufis, and other “heretical” Muslim sects. To further that objective in South Asia, the MWL backed the Deobandis and other Salafi fundamentalist groups ideologically akin to Wahhabis. Meanwhile, the Saudis sent missionaries and funding for Islamic schools…. From 19 7 3 to 20 0 2, the Saudi government spent more than $ 80 billion on Islamic institutions and activities in the non-Muslim world alone…. construction of more than 1,500 mosques, 150 Islamic centers, 20 2 Muslim colleges, and 2,0 0 0 Islamic schools. 36 As of 20 0 2, Saudi funding produced an estimated 10 0 0 0 Deobandi-run schools in India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh. Other targets for Wahhabi outreach were countries with large Muslim populations like Albania, Kosovo, and Bosnia, where the Saudis have spent more than $ 6 0 0 million alone. As a result of this outreach, nearly 80 percent of all Islamic institutions in the U.S. and Canada are Saudi-sponsored, not to mention mosques and Islamic centers across Western Europe”
4.http://www.independent.mk/articles/4072/Bosnian+Jihad+Teenagers+Announce+Getting+Married
5.https://www.moderndiplomacy.eu/index.php?option=com_k2&view=item&id=459:wahhabi-s-on-the-warpath-in-sydney-australia&Itemid=487
6.http://www.thelocal.at/20141128/profile-of-a-jihadist-terror-arrestee-revealed
7.http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2865316/The-terror-mastermind-recruited-Austrian-ISIS-poster-girls-got-160-join-jihad-Syria-Iraq.html
8.http://en.annahar.com/article/179305-austrian-teens-latest-victims-of-rape-by-by-is-husbands-now-want-to-come-home-as
9.http://www.nydailynews.com/news/world/expert-austrian-teen-girl-dead-joining-isis-article-1.2049826
10.See December 12,  2014 article http://www.thelocal.at/20141212/custody-extended-for-islamic-hate-preacher
11.http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2865316/The-terror-mastermind-recruited-Austrian-ISIS-poster-girls-got-160-join-jihad-Syria-Iraq.html
12.In October 2014   http://www.theaustralian.com.au/in-depth/terror/antiterrorism-police-raid-melbourne-homes-over-jihad-funding/story-fnpdbcmu-1227075758106?nk=3fbccc7f0481beca5a6cad9fe4db4df3
13.http://aje.me/1y87zHQ
14.http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2852886/Austria-13-radical-Islamic-suspects-arrested.html
15.See December, 11, 2014  http://www.thelocal.at/20141211/austria-passes-anti-terror-law
16.See December, 11, 2014  http://www.thelocal.at/20141211/austria-passes-anti-terror-law
17.http://www.thelocal.at/20141201/austria-launches-hotline-for-extremism

Alexander Athos is a writer and businessman.He was awarded a Bachelor of Arts (European History) Personal background Alexander was christened Orthodox brought up Catholic and now Evangelical Christian with an acceptance of the best in Christian tradition and a respect for genuine people of faith from other cultures. Political inclinations: Christian intellectual who has an eclectic predisposition to understanding global and national political and social trends and seeking to influence them for good by thoughtful and persuasive discourse.

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Terrorism

Stateless and Leftover ISIS Brides

Sagar N

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While the World is busy fighting the pandemic and the economic devastation caused by it, one of the important problem that has been pushed to dormancy, is the status of the ISIS(Islamic State of Iraq and Syria) brides. The Pandemic has crippled the capacity of the law enforcement and exploiting this the ISIS executed attacks in Maldives, Iraq, and the Philippines. The United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres has warned that terrorists are exploiting the COVID-19 Pandemic. Albeit the ISIS has been defeated, approximately ten thousand of them are in ISIS detention centres in Northern Syria under Kurds. Most of these detention centres are filled by women and children, who are relatives or widows of the ISIS fighters. With their native states denouncing them, the status of the stateless women and children is unclear.

As it stands today states’ counter-terrorism approach has been primarily targeting male militants but women also have played a role in strengthening these terrorist organizations. Women involvement in militant organizations has increased as they perform several activities like birthing next-generation militants/jihadists, managing the logistics and recruiting the new members to the organizations. The world did not recognize women as key players in terrorist organizations until the 1980s when females held major roles in guerilla wars of southern America. Women have either willingly or unwillingly held a variety of roles in these extremist organizations and Islamist terrorist organizations like Hamas and al-Qaeda women do simply provide moral support.

According to the media reports since the US withdrawal from Iraq in 2006 female suicide attacks have been increased and they have been extensively part of ISIS. The ISIS had a female brigade which they called as Al-Khansaa which was established to perform search activities in the state. Both foreign and domestic recruits in the Islamic state have participated in brutal torture. A recently acquired logbook from a guesthouse in Syria provides important information about 1100 females who joined the organization, the western women who are called as ‘the muhajirat’.

When the people from rest of the world joined organizations such as ISIS, they burnt their passports and rejected their national identity. Especially women from western countries who were radicalized online based on their phenomenon ‘ISIS brides/Jihadi brides’ to marry terrorists. Since Islamic State isnot recognized by the world these marriages are not legally valid, apart from this a number of these brides have experienced sexual torture and extreme violence.

While the erstwhile members of the extremist organizations like ISIS and others are left adrift the one challenging question remaining is should states and their societies keep them and reengage or rehabilitate or prosecute them. How firmly the idea of their erstwhile organization is stuck in their minds and especially the followers who crossed the world to join remains a concern to many. The U.S backed Kurdish forces across turkey border hold thousands of these left-behind women and children in their centre. Hundreds of foreign women and children who were once part of an aspirant state, The caliphate are now floating around the concentration camps in Syria, Turkey and Kurdish detention centres and prisons. Many are waiting to return to their origin countries. They pose a unique challenge to their native states like whether to include them or not and even if they include how to integrate adults who at least for a time part of these terrorist organizations and what to do with children who are too young to understand the politics and obstacles keeping them in camps and detention centres where resources are scarce. Women present a problem because its hard to know what kind of crimes they have committed beyond the membership of the terrorist organization.

It is no secret that women also have been part of insurgency across the world, like in ISIS,LTTE,PIRA and PFLP. The responsibility of women in ISIS includes wife to ISIS soldiers, birthing the next generation of jihad and advancing ISIS’ global reach through online recruiting. The International Center for Study of Radicalization (ICAR) estimates that out of 40000 people joined ISIS from 80 different countries nearly 8000 are women and children. After the defeat of ISIS and such extreme organization those who are left behind possess the ideological commitment and practical skills which again a threat upon return to home countries.

The states across the world are either revoking the citizenship or ignore their responsibility. The most famous case of Shamima  Begum a UK citizen married to an ISIS fighter whose citizenship was revoked by the UK government. In other cases like HodaMuthana of the USA and Iman Osman of Tunisia have been the same case. As recently as Tooba Gondal an ISIS bride who now in a detention camp in northern Syria begged to go home in the UK in a public apology.

The American president Donald Trump issued a statement saying women who joined ISIS cannot return. The NATO deputy head said “…returning ISIS fighters and brides must face full rigours of the law”. Revoking the citizenship and making someone stateless is illegal under international law and it is also important to know how gendered these cases are because the UK have successfully prosecuted Mohammad Uddin and the USA has also done it so. Stripping off their citizenship itself a punishment before proper trail and the only good out of it would state can take their hands off in dealing with cases. Samantha Elhassani the only American who repatriated from Iraq so far and pleaded guilty for supporting ISIS. Meanwhile, France is trying to route its citizens who joined the ISIS and extradited few who are under trial in Bagdad.

As experts and political analysts say “countries should take responsibility for their own citizens” because failure to do so will also make the long term situation more dangerous as jihadists will try to a hideout and turn into militant groups for their protection. The children, the second-generation ISIS need cultural centres and rehabilitation centres and this is an international problem. These women known as jihadists brides suffer from a post-traumatic stress disorder and many are pregnant or multiple children born in ISIS territory.

In some countries travelling abroad to join the insurgencies in North Africa and Syria was not always a criminal act, Sweden criminalized such act recently but to prosecute them proof of offences committed in the conflict zone is difficult to collect and most countries in the world do not allow the pre-trial detention for more than 14 days. With problems of different national Lawson extradition and capital punishment and to prosecute them in conflict countries is also a challenge for states. Since Kurdish forces have signalled that they cannot bring all the prisoners into justice the home countries will have to act or else it might create a long term dangerous situation. With the civil war in Syria is about to end it is time to address these issues because since there are more ISIS fighters in Kurdish prisons and detention centres they could be influenced to join rebels who are fighting the regime of Assad in last standing province of Idlib.

If the governments reject the repatriation applications then they will be signalling that their action is essential for national security and thus asserting that failed or poorly resourced states are better equipped to handle potential extremists. The criminal system in Iraq is corrupt and human rights violations have been reported and which creates the risk of further radicalization. One should not forget that even citizenship of Osama bin laden was also stripped but which did not stop him from forming al-Qaeda in Afghanistan. If the citizens commit crimes and forget their responsibility then the states must bring them to justice instead of stripping citizenship. The states must come with a solution for this problem before its too late, setting up an international tribunal to deal with these cases would be a great start but these tribunals are time-consuming and expensive.

States must act as a responsible actor in the international system. Jihadist terrorism is a global problem and states must act together to deal with it because with nearly 40000 fighters joining caliphate from across the world it only shows how global and deeply rooted the phenomenon is. Instead of stripping their citizens’ citizenship, states must find a way to act together for the peace and security of the international community.

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Terrorism

COVID-19: Game-changer for international peace and security

Newsroom

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In Iraq, children look over a wall at clouds of smoke from burning oil wells, the result of oil fires set by ISIL. © UNICEF/Lindsay Mackenzie

The world has “entered a volatile and unstable new phase” in terms of the impact of COVID-19 on peace and security, the UN chief told a virtual meeting with world leaders on Wednesday.

Speaking at one of a series of international meetings among heads of State to enhance global cooperation in fighting terrorism and violent extremism, as part of the Aqaba Process, Secretary-General António Guterres said the pandemic was more than a global health crisis.

“It is a game-changer for international peace and security”, he spelled out, emphasizing that the process can play a key role in “promoting unity and aligning thinking” on how to beat back the pandemic.

Warning lights flashing

Mr. Guterres maintained that the coronavirus has exposed the basic fragility of humankind, laid bare systemic and entrenched inequalities, and thrust into the spotlight, geopolitical challenges and security threats.

“The warning lights are flashing”, he said, pointing out that as the virus is “exacerbating grievances, undermining social cohesion and fueling conflicts”, it is also likely to “act as a catalyst in the spread of terrorism and violent extremism”.

Moreover, international tensions are being driven by supply chain disruptions, protectionism and growing nationalism – with rising unemployment, food insecurity and climate change, helping to fuel political unrest.

A generation in crosshairs

The UN chief also noted that a generation of students is missing school.

“A whole generation…has seen its education disrupted”, he stated. “Many young people are experiencing a second global recession in their short lives.”

He explained that they feel left out, neglected and disillusioned by their prospects in an uncertain world.

Wanted: Global solidarity 

The pandemic has highlighted vulnerabilities to emerging threats such as bioterrorism and cyber-attacks on critical infrastructure.

“The world faces grave security challenges that no single country or organization can address alone”, upheld the Secretary-General, “there is an urgent need for global unity and solidarity”.

Recalling the UN’s Virtual Counter-Terrorism Week in July, he reminded that participants called for a “reinvigorated commitment to multilateralism to combat terrorism and violent extremism”.

However, a lack of international cooperation to tackle the pandemic has been “startling”, Mr. Guterres said, highlighting national self-interest, transactional information sharing and manifestations of authoritarianism. 

‘Put people first’

The UN chief stressed that “we must not return to the status quo ante“.

He outlined the need to put people first, by enhancing information sharing and technical cooperation “to prevent terrorists exploiting the pandemic for their own nefarious goals” and thinking “long-term solutions rather than short-term fixes”.

“This includes upholding the rights and needs of victims of terrorism…[and] the repatriation of foreign terrorist fighters, especially women and children,  and their dependents to their countries of origin”, he elaborated.

Closing window 

Meanwhile, the risk of COVID-19 is exacerbating the already dire security and humanitarian situation in Syrian and Iraqi camps housing refugees and the displaced.

“The window of opportunity is closing so we must seize the moment”, the UN chief said. “We cannot ignore our responsibilities and leave children to fend for themselves and at the mercy of terrorist exploitation”.

He also expressed confidence that the Aqaba Process will continue to “strengthen international counter-terrorism cooperation, identify and fill capacity gaps, and address evolving security threats associated with the pandemic”, and offered the UN’s “full support”.

Post-COVID rebuilding 

The Secretary-General also addressed the Centenary Summit of the International Organization of Employers (IOE) on how private and public sector cooperation can help drive post-COVID change. 

He lauded the IOE’s “significant contributions” to global policymaking for economic and social progress, job creation and a mutually beneficial business environment, calling it “an important pillar of the International Labour Organization (ILO) since its earliest days”.  

“Today, our primary task is to defeat the pandemic and rebuild lives, livelihoods, businesses, and economies”, he told the virtual Summit.

In building back, he underscored that workers and small business be protected, and everyone be given the opportunity to fulfil their potential. 

Businesses input

The UN chief urged businesses to engage with the multilateral system to create a “conducive global environment for decent work, investment, and sustainability”; and with the UN at the national level, to help ensure that multilateralism “works on the ground”.    

He also encouraged them to actively participate in national and global public-private dialogue and initiatives, stressing, “there must be space for them to do so”. 

Tripartite cooperation

ILO chief Guy Ryder highlighted the need for “conscious policy decisions and tripartite cooperation to overcome transformational challenges”, such as technological change and climate change, as well as COVID-19. 

Mr. Ryder also flagged that employers must continue to collaborate in social dialogue and maintain their commitment to both multilateralism and the ILO.

The IOE represents more than 50 million companies and is a key partner in the international multilateral system for over 100 years as the voice of business at the ILO, across the UN, the G20 richest countries and other emerging forums.

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Terrorism

Traumas of terrorism cannot be erased, but victims’ voices must never be forgotten

Newsroom

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In remembering and honouring all victims of terrorism, Secretary-General António Guterres said the UN stands by those who grieve and those who “continue to endure the physical and psychological wounds of terrorist atrocities”.

“Traumatic memories cannot be erased, but we can help victims and survivors by seeking truth, justice and reparation, amplifying their voices and upholding their human rights”, he stressed.

Keep spotlight on victims, even amid pandemic

This year’s commemoration takes place against the backdrop of the COVID-19 pandemic, when vital services for victims, such as criminal justice processes and psychosocial support, have been interrupted, delayed or ended as Governments focus attention and resources on fighting the pandemic.

Moreover, many memorials and commemorations have been cancelled or moved online, hampering the ability of victims to find solace and comfort together. 

And the current restrictions have also forced the first-ever UN Global Congress of Victims of Terrorism has to be postponed until next year.

“But it is important that we keep a spotlight on this important issue,” stressed the UN chief.

“Remembering the victims of terrorism and doing more to support them is essential to help them rebuild their lives and heal”, said Mr. Guterres, including work with parliamentarians and governments to draft and adopt legislation and national strategies to help victims.

The Secretary-General vowed that “the UN stands in solidarity with all victims of terrorism – today and every day” and underscored the need to “ensure that those who have suffered are always heard and never forgotten”.

Terrorism unjustifiable

General Assembly President Tijjani Muhammad-Bande saluted the resilience of terrorist survivors and called the day “an opportunity to honour the memories of the innocent civilians who have lost their lives as a result of terrorist acts around the world”.

“Terrorism, in all forms and manifestations, can never be justified”, he stated. “Acts of terrorism everywhere must be strongly condemned”.
The UN commits to combating terrorism and the Assembly has adopted resolutions to curb the scourge while working to establish and maintain peace and security globally. 

Strengthen assistance

Mechanisms for survivors must be strengthened to safeguard a “full recovery, rehabilitation and re-integration into society through long-term multi-dimensional support”, stated the UN official.

“Together we can ensure that you live a full life defined by dignity and freedom. You are not alone in this journey. You are not forgotten”, concluded the Assembly president.

‘Human dimension’ 

Closing the event, Vladimir Voronkov, chief of the UN Office of Counter-Terrorism, maintained that victims represent “the very human dimension of terrorism”.

While terrorists try to depersonalize victims by reducing them to mere numbers or statistics, Mr. Voronkov maintained that “we have a responsibility to do the exact opposite”.

“We must see victims’ hopes, dreams and daily lives that have been shattered by terrorist violence – a shattering that carries on long after the attack is over”, he stated. “We must ensure their human rights are upheld and their needs are met”.

Reaffirming humanity

While acknowledging the “terrible reality of terrorism”, Mr. Voronkov flagged that the survivors shine as “examples of resilience, and beacons of hope, courage and solidarity in the face of adversity”.

In reaffirming “our common humanity”, he urged everyone to raise awareness of victims needs and rights.

“Let us commit to showing them that they are not alone and will never be forgotten”, concluded the Counter-Terrorism chief.

Survivors remember

At the virtual event, survivors shared their stories while under lockdown, agreeing that the long-term impacts of surviving any kind of an attack is that the traumatic experience never really goes away.

Tahir from Pakistan lost his wife in attack against the UN World Food Programme (WFP) office in Islamabad.  

“If you have an accident, you know how to cope with it. Terminal illness, you know how to cope with it. But there is no coping mechanism for a person who dies in an act of terror”, he said.

Meanwhile Nigeel’s father perished in the 1998 US Embassy attack in Kenya, when he was just months years old. 

The 22 year-old shared: “When you are growing, it really doesn’t have a heavy impact on you, but as life starts to unfold, mostly I’ll find myself asking if I do this and my dad was around, would he be proud of me?”

And Julie, from Australia, lost her 21-year-old daughter in the 2017 London Bridge attack.

“The Australian police came to our house and said ‘we have a body, still not confirmed’, so they recommended that we fly to London”, she recalled. “I can’t describe how devastating as a parent to lose a child in these circumstances is for the rest of your life”.

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