Osama Rizvi

Osama Rizvi

Independent economic analyst, Writer and Editor

O
f-late the monotonous oscillation of oil prices is making it difficult for writers and analysts to get any sense out of this whimsical trend. After the Vienna Oil deal in November 2016 and after the 21st January meeting between oil producers the oil prices have been moving up and down in the $50-$60 band.

I
t has been almost more than a week as Mr. Trump has stepped into the White House. These 7 days saw the fulfillment of few promises. The White House was ringing with Executive Orders. Repealing of Trans-Pacific Partnership, Sanctioning Keystone and Dakota pipelines and halting the flow of funds for organizations that support abortion. How can we forget The Mexican Wall?

E
IA recently reported that this year (2017) will see a highly volatile oil price. From 30th November to hitherto oil prices have seen a considerable upward trend. The prices have fluctuated at times due to the build-up in inventory and increase in the rig count, and at times when the wave of uncertainty swept across the markets---as it did in case of Libya and Iraq. Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and others have reported to be cutting their production as per the agreement.

A
mong political observers, there is a widespread notion that U.S. President-elect Donald Trump will inherit an economy in the best of shape. Inflation is down to historic and desirable levels, the unemployment rate stands at 4.9% and U.S. economic growth is better than expected. Moreover, observers can’t help but hear Mr. Trump’s boastful rhetoric as soon as he steps onto the bully pulpit. But as promising as the picture might seem, it will be very difficult to carry off his promise of ‘getting back our jobs’ in the long term.

A
new year—new issues, new aims and ambitions. In the first snippet of Market Insights let us see what are the most pressing issues in the political economy in this year. Let us start with the European shock—Brexit. Theresa May has said to invoke the article 50 in March. Pound Sterling is expected go down in the coming months as the uncertainty looms over the economic performance of the UK under the new trade relations the medium and method of which will be formed in the coming months.

T
he world has always been an inquisitive olio of kaleidoscopic diplomacy. After the World War-1 we saw how nations toggled between alliances and camaraderie betwixt one another as globalization begun to spread its thousands of tentacles around the world. With the proliferation in technology, scarcity of resources and blurring of the boundaries the aforesaid trend has only gained more momentum and today we live in a world that is intricately connected.

T
he stage is set. The world waits. There are murmurs and whispers. There are speculations and surmises. On 30th November OPEC and Non OPEC countries engage in a rendezvous in an effort to secure a deal. The whole world looks up to it. But a thwart seems to hang over.

A
s it happened, the unimaginable, the least possible, a threat to some, and a concern for others. Aye, I talk about the rhetoric spewing, rabble-rousing and populist Mr. Trump. His triumph on November 8th, 2016 sent shock-waves and the whole world was put in a state of quiver.

A
ll seemed hunky-dory. The air was suffused with a sanguine current cascading through the markets and rallying up the prices touching a year-high of $53.73. Saudi Arabia aims to cut 2%-4% of total production and Russia also says that it will drain some 700,000 bpd. But the whole scenario was tinged with a shadow of askance.

Borders thronged with soldiers. War drills. Scything rhetoric and deranged shreds of unfounded accusations. This is how we can best explain the recent situation between the two big names which are supposed to build, along with two other countries, a pipeline called TAPI.

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