Samantha Maloof

Samantha Maloof

Samantha is a freshly minted graduate in International Relations based in Cairo, currently working as a research assistant in a small think tank looking at development and inequality in Africa

Some unexpectedly good news came out of the long-beleaguered DRC on July 2nd, when the WHO declared an end to the Ebola outbreak that had started just 42 days before. The announcement prompted a global sigh of relief, as the outbreak was the country’s first since the catastrophic West African epidemic that raged in five countries between 2014 and 2016, killing more than 11,000 people.  

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he following statement was made in Washington in response to the decision by Saudi Arabia, the UAE, Bahrain, and Egypt to cut ties with Qatar, which they accuse of funding terrorism: “Our expectation is that these countries will immediately take steps to de-escalate the situation and put forth a good faith effort to resolve their grievances they have with each other.”

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or someone who has made no secret of his enmity towards Islam, it was surprising enough that the first international event to tempt President Donald Trump to leave US soil ended up being the Arab Islamic American Summit in Saudi Arabia.

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he UK Prime Minister Theresa May’s visit to Bahrain this week for the Gulf Cooperation Council summit is a bid to strengthen ties with the GCC member states ahead of Britain’s exit from the European Union, but it is also a chance for the UK to nudge some of its key partners toward long-overdue respect for human rights and democratic reforms.

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hen Donald Trump was elected to be the 45th President of the United States, he did so on vague promises and undefined policies. While Asia and Europe featured prominently on the campaign trail, he has been silent on any issue pertaining to Africa. Now that Trump will be taking office in January 2017, there is much uncertainty over the shape his future Africa policy will take, and how the relationship between the United States and the African continent will be affected by his presidency.

Earlier this month, over 40 African Union (AU) nations signed a binding agreement to curb piracy and other maritime crime on the continent’s coastlines. The meeting in Lomé, Tongo, drew 18 heads of state – considerably more than most African Union meetings – a fact that demonstrates the importance to African leaders of curbing piracy, illegal fishing, and other crime on Africa’s economically endangered coastlines. The deal will establish a maritime security fund, and is also meant to strengthen cooperation and communication between governments.

Saying that coffee is ubiquitous in the West is a colossal understatement. The consumption of coffee is about one third the level of tap water in North America and Europe. Over half of all Americans over the age of eighteen consume coffee on a daily basis. In order to meet demand, the United States imports around $4 billion worth of coffee each year. However, as coffee consumption continues to increase, climate change is making it difficult to keep pace with demand.

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