Dr. Arshad M. Khan

Dr. Arshad M. Khan

Dr. Arshad M. Khan is a former Professor based in the US.  Educated at King's College London, OSU and The University of Chicago, he has a multidisciplinary background that has frequently informed his research.  Thus he headed the analysis of an innovation survey of Norway, and his work on SMEs published in major journals has been widely cited.  He has for several decades also written for the press:  These articles and occasional comments have appeared in print media such as The Dallas Morning News, Dawn (Pakistan), The Fort Worth Star Telegram, The Monitor, The Wall Street Journal and others.  On the internet, he has written for Antiwar.com, Asia Times, Common Dreams, Counterpunch, Countercurrents, Dissident Voice, Eurasia Review and Modern Diplomacy among many.  His work has been quoted in the U.S. Congress and published in its Congressional Record. 

In July, the Caine Prize for African Writing was awarded to Lidudumalingani Mgombothi. The 10,000 pounds sterling award recognizes African writers for short stories written in English. His story, "Memories We Lost," is graced with beautifully expressed sentences, and one in particular is apt for the role often played by governments: "Secrets stay buried for so long, but one day they rise to open like seeds breaking free from the earth."

While there may be no real evidence of a historical Moses (for the Egyptians were obsessive about recording significant events, as an exodus of 2 M people would have been), the Hollywood version with Charlton Heston demanding, "Let my people go," tells us not much has changed in human nature. Human lives and economic damage notwithstanding, India clings on to Kashmir with over a half million security personnel.

That perception is prelude to reality is implicit. We believe it in our bones. But it is not always so, particularly in the case of suicide bombing. For example, our gut reactions for prevention fed by Donald Trump would only exacerbate the situation. Another misconception: the origins of suicide bombing do not lie with jihadi groups.

Young women will die and Dalits suffer unless the world takes notice and forces governments to act

What price honor? Two fathers, heads of their families, shake hands on an agreement, sealing it and the fates of two young children. My word is my bond. I can never dishonor it for dishonor brings ostracism, even death, in a community of mutual help for survival. So it is, where those who bring dishonor must die.

Smart politicians kiss babies with a smile and are polite to old ladies. No one wants to appear a bully or a boor. That is unless you are Donald Trump, for it is exactly what he has been doing this week to his cost ... at least temporarily.

One of the most memorable lines on George W. Bush is due to Ann Richards, a former Texas governor, who passed away in 2006. "Poor George," she said, "he can't help it. He was born with a silver foot in his mouth!" -- an apt description also of the newly crowned standard bearer of the Republican party.

It was the lull between conventions and then a bomb was dropped by Wikileaks. Who would have known the first day of the Democratic gathering would be the scene of such chaos? The 20,000-odd leaked emails between Democratic National Committee (DNC) officials made a mockery of their pretense of neutrality, and confirmed what Bernie Sanders had been saying for months. Worse, the DNC members were not just actively supporting Hillary Clinton's campaign but were devising ways of destroying the Sanders campaign, including how to capitalize on Sanders' atheism.

The festival of demagoguery, jingoism and cult of personality is over, and seldom has the public been deluged with such a combination. Is it any wonder then that the GOP establishment is hiding in embarrassment. Should the Democrats be relieved? They probably are, though they could have wished for it to run longer as continuing proof of Trump incompetence.

The crux of the Kashmir problem is very simple (although often carefully elided in many essays on the subject): The Kashmiris want a voice in their future. Since 1947, when it was occupied by India, many generations of Kashmiris have delivered the same message.

What stands out in the British Iraq Inquiry (Chilcot) report is the sidestepping of the war crime issue. But then it was carefully placed outside its scope. This omission aside, the indictments remain, damning and morally appalling. Thus it confirms the war was launched on a false pretext. Major General Michael Laurie made plain in his testimony that Tony Blair's notorious "dossier" was designed to persuade Members of Parliament to vote for the war: "We knew at the time that the purpose of the dossier was precisely to make a case for war rather than setting out the available evidence." In this, he echoes CIA Director George Tenet's notorious "slam dunk case."

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