Dr. Arshad M. Khan

Dr. Arshad M. Khan

Dr. Arshad M. Khan is a former Professor based in the US.  Educated at King's College London, OSU and The University of Chicago, he has a multidisciplinary background that has frequently informed his research.  Thus he headed the analysis of an innovation survey of Norway, and his work on SMEs published in major journals has been widely cited.  He has for several decades also written for the press:  These articles and occasional comments have appeared in print media such as The Dallas Morning News, Dawn (Pakistan), The Fort Worth Star Telegram, The Monitor, The Wall Street Journal and others.  On the internet, he has written for Antiwar.com, Asia Times, Common Dreams, Counterpunch, Countercurrents, Dissident Voice, Eurasia Review and Modern Diplomacy among many.  His work has been quoted in the U.S. Congress and published in its Congressional Record. 

There are two kinds of people:  those with, and without, grace.  President Trump can decide on which side he falls, although Mrs. Abe the Japanese Prime Minister's wife has clearly made up her mind.  Anyone who can read a whole speech in English knows enough to say, 'Excuse me, I do not speak English well'.  So, to not respond at all to the U.S. president sitting beside her, who turns to converse, conveys a distinct meaning.

Today, July 14, is Bastille Day.  It is the day when the common people of France, despairing their grievances would never be addressed, stormed the Bastille  It was a turning point for the French Revolution, and is celebrated annually with parades, fireworks and general festivity.

About a hundred miles north of Bangalore, India, in the village of Thimmamma Marrimanu grows an eponymous banyan tree. There are all kinds of records for trees: the tallest, the stoutest, the oldest, and so on, but the record for the largest canopy, at an astounding five acres, is held by this banyan. And it also holds the key to the Korean enigma.

The North Koreans sent the U.S. a gift on its July 4th Independence Day.  In the morning, -- their time, it was still July 3rd evening in Washington -- they launched a missile.  It reached a height of 1741 miles (2802 Km) which was 400 miles higher than the earlier May 14 launch.  Calling it the Hwasong-14, they have claimed it has a range of 10,000 km and can reach anywhere in the world.

T
he well-known journalist, Seymour Hersch, has published an article in the German newspaper Die Welt refuting President Trump's assertions blaming the Syrians for the chemical incident at Khan Shaykhun on April 4th.  Worse, it accuses him of ignoring the intelligence that supported the Syrian and Russian version of events.  Mr. Hersch's source(s)?  Senior U.S. intelligence operatives.

T
here is a disturbing, discordant dissonance in the world. It is an uncomfortable feeling that something really bad is about to happen. Events unfold almost daily each of which would have been cause for shock and alarm once upon a time.

A
rnold Turling is a very angry and unhappy man -- vindicated but at what cost. Three years ago, he advised the All Party Parliamentary Rescue Group that cheap flammable insulation filler inside the new waterproof cladding and lack of a sprinkler system made buildings like Grenfell Tower a disaster waiting to happen.

W
hen Donald Trump began his presidential campaign no one believed he could possibly be elected. When David Cameron went to the country on EU membership, he could not imagine 'Remain' losing. So it was with Theresa May. Ahead in the polls by 21 points she sought an unassailable majority.

T
his Thursday, June 1, the U.S. decided to withdraw from the Paris Climate Accord. Like Brexit, the process is not like instant coffee; if anything, it is much more of a slow brew to which one could add harvesting or even growing the coffee in the first place. To prevent disruption for other members, it calls for a period of delay and negotiation taking four years. Therefore the final decision will rest on the president's successor -- unless the voters elect Mr. Trump to a second term.

T
he thirst for war is ancient. As old as disputatious neighbors or rival tribes, it is enticing -- a siren call for the strong, presenting as it does a quick, easy and final solution. That it is often not, has hastened the end of royal dynasties (Hohenzollerns, Hapsburgs and Romanovs after WWI) and empires, including the British. There are cogent arguments both world wars could have been avoided: the first, Europe fell into in accidental haste; the second, an end of a trail leading from the first.

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