Dr. Arshad M. Khan

Dr. Arshad M. Khan

Dr. Arshad M. Khan is a former Professor based in the US.  Educated at King's College London, OSU and The University of Chicago, he has a multidisciplinary background that has frequently informed his research.  Thus he headed the analysis of an innovation survey of Norway, and his work on SMEs published in major journals has been widely cited.  He has for several decades also written for the press:  These articles and occasional comments have appeared in print media such as The Dallas Morning News, Dawn (Pakistan), The Fort Worth Star Telegram, The Monitor, The Wall Street Journal and others.  On the internet, he has written for Antiwar.com, Asia Times, Common Dreams, Counterpunch, Countercurrents, Dissident Voice, Eurasia Review and Modern Diplomacy among many.  His work has been quoted in the U.S. Congress and published in its Congressional Record. 

We live in a world of denial:  The Burmese deny the Rohingya; they call them Bengali even though they have lived in Burma for centuries -- some say as early as the 11th century.  Even the Pope, afraid of the consequences to a small Christian minority, shied away during his visit, confining himself to the all-encompassing phrase, the rights of minorities.

The koala is an engaging, docile, cuddly and lovable animal.  It is also, tragically, undergoing a decline in numbers.  To the extent climate change and a degraded environment are responsible, we can be blamed for not heeding the repeated warnings of scientists and others.

The Jerusalem story is the centerpiece of news this week.  Donald Trump and Mike Pence, an evangelical, in favor of moving the embassy and Rex Tillerson and John Mattis opposed in their discussion prior to the announcement.  That State and Defense departments both found the move detrimental to U.S. interests underlines how politics trump sound policy.

Pyongyang tested another intercontinental ballistic missile on Wednesday.  Fired nearly vertically, it reached an altitude of 4500 km (2800 miles).  That means it could travel 13,000 km (8150 miles) on a standard trajectory, according to the Union of Concerned Scientists, putting the entire continental U.S. within its range. 

If there was a striking theme in the Trump Asian trip, it was a clearly less muscular policy towards China. U.S. naval patrols to reinforce freedom of navigation rights in the South China Sea were always provocative and appear to have ceased. 

The UN has announced record average levels of CO2. So states the annual flagship report released October 30 by its World Meteorological Organization. The average levels measured using ships, aircraft and land stations have reached over 400 parts per million (ppm), prompting the authors and other scientists to urge strong action. 

It is a year since Donald J. Trump's election as president on November 8, 2016, and a couple of months less since his inauguration.  In that time the bombast has not stopped, the achievements remain meager.

Four US soldiers died in Niger on October 4, and the president's insensitive phone call to the widow of one has brought the subject of the military in every corner of the world back in the news.

Tales of exaggeration and outright lies by this president are not new.  In 1974, the New York Times did a profile on the young Trump.  He claimed he was worth $200 million when his taxable income then was $2,200 a week; that he was of Swedish heritage; that he had graduated at the top of his class at Wharton!   Claims of high intelligence are repeated often, and an assurance of how he would get better deals abroad.

It has been a week of repeated insults to U.S. adventurism and Donald Trump's ill-defined Middle East policy.  In Iraq, thanks to Iranian backing and astute negotiation, Kirkuk province is back in the hands of the Shia government in Baghdad halving the Kurds' oil revenues.  Iran now has a land bridge through Syria to the Mediterranean improving the accessibility of its exports to Europe.

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