Luis Durani

Luis Durani

Luis Durani is currently employed in the oil and gas industry. He previously worked in the nuclear energy industry. He has a M.A. in international affairs with a focus on Chinese foreign policy and the South China Sea, MBA, M.S. in nuclear engineering, B.S. in mechanical engineering and B.A. in political science. He is also author of "Afghanistan: It’s No Nebraska – How to do Deal with a Tribal State" and "China and the South China Sea: The Emergence of the Huaqing Doctrine." Follow him for other articles on Instagram: @Luis_Durani

W
hether one agrees with Donald Trump’s economic policies or not, the state of economy he will inherit needs to be clarified. A recent article by the Washington Post’s Catherine Rampell stated as one of her main theses that Trump will inherit a strong and vibrant economy. While other aspects of the article make interesting points, the premise upon which the article’s foundation lies upon is mistaken. The economy that is being handed to President-elect Trump is not in the most favorable conditions as claimed by the article, it is actually the contrary.

P
ax Romana and Pax Britannica marked an era of relative peace and prosperity for both the Roman and British Empire, respectively. After World War II, American power was unrivaled and an era of Pax Americana began to reign, but that era has waned ever since.

W
ith the elections over and a new president elected, half of the electorate is still reeling from the surprise upset created by Donald Trump. Due to the mechanisms behind the American democratic system, Donald Trump has managed to assume the highest office in the US and perhaps the world.

I
t is without a shadow doubt this election has been one of the most vitriolic, negative and perhaps worst display of electoral politics in recent American history.

Donald Trump has come to epitomize an array of adjectives in the political jargon. While his no non-sense approach elevated him to the top of the Republican Party as well as allowed him to take the lead against Hilary Clinton for a while, his continuous non-filtered approach has had a major setback recently.

US vice-president Joe Biden is in Turkey to help shore up the languishing relation between the US and Turkey. The Turkish-US alliance has reached a new low ever since the coup that almost overthrew President Erdogan from power. Rumors are suggesting the US will relocate its strategically placed nuclear warheads from Turkey to Romania. This movement of US nuclear arms, which have been stationed in Turkey since the Cold War, signals a new shift in the trajectory of US-Turkish relationship.

The Middle East is undergoing major whirlwinds of change. Two major events in recent weeks are about to bring tectonic shifts in Middle Eastern politics. While the region is known for its continuous turbulence and fickleness, nevertheless certain epochal events can change the tide and trajectory of the region and its politics.

The 2016 elections presents a divergence in US foreign policy between the two major candidates. On one hand is the continuance of the status-quo by Hilary Clinton, who is pushing for a value-based foreign policy, as all presidents have done for decades while Donald Trump is looking for a shift in US foreign policy that hearkens backs to a time when the US was less interventionist and more explicit about its interests rather than claiming to cultivate democratic governments.

The fallout from Brexit has not only affected the economic and social trajectories of Europe but also will shift the military dynamics of the continent. During the Cold War, NATO had been the defender of Western Europe from any potential Soviet attack. As the Cold War ended, any external threat to the continent mostly dissipated.

The recent ruling by the international tribunal in the Hague on the deliberations between the Philippines and China over territory in the South China Sea has created a more precarious region. Chinese officials swiftly rebuked the binding decision that found its artificial island construction, behavior, as well as the supposed nine-dash claim baseless. China was not expecting a full out favorable ruling but surprised by the level of condemnation it received.

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