Jasna Čošabić, PhD

Jasna Čošabić, PhD

Professor of EU and IT law, Banja Luka College, BiH

(Reflection on text: Privacy i(n)t context of 18 April 2016, www.moderndiplomacy.eu)

While there was a surge of media analyses more then one and a half year ago, when the European Court of Human Rights (“the Court“)  found no violation of the right to respect for privacy for monitoring Yahoo account of employee[1], earlier in September 2017 the story unfolded completely otherwise.

F
rom the proclaimed right to be connected to the evolving right to be disconnected, only few years have passed. However in internet sphere, prompted by the fast developing world of technologies, law has to catch up as well.

IT law or cyber law or internet law, is evolving in giant steps. On its way, it has many challenges to meet and a lot of burdens to cope with. Being a part of international law, it is though specific in its nature, mode of implementation and protection. While the classic international law deals with classic state territories, state jurisdictions, with a clear distinction between national laws, the IT law is uncertain about the state jurisdiction, earthbound borders, rules and proceedings regarding any dispute arising on internet.

The right to privacy, or the right to respect for private life, as the European Convention on Human Rights guarantees it, has been affected by the IT growth era. Privacy has long been protected, but will face a new dimension of protection for the generations to come. The right to respect for private life is not an absolute one, and may have a different feature in different context.

Who is the supreme human rights judge in Europe?

In normal life, the answer would be no.
Usually, whether we are going to be remembered or forgotten is not something that we could opt for. We can indeed thrive to by our actions or deeds, but the final outcome of this psychological process is up to third persons having a good or bad perception about us.

Top