Emanuel L. Paparella, Ph.D.

Emanuel L. Paparella, Ph.D.

Professor Paparella has earned a Ph.D. in Italian Humanism, with a dissertation on the philosopher of history Giambattista Vico, from Yale University. He is a scholar interested in current relevant philosophical, political and cultural issues; the author of numerous essays and books on the EU cultural identity among which A New Europe in search of its Soul, and Europa: An Idea and a Journey. Presently he teaches philosophy and humanities at Barry University, Miami, Florida. He is a prolific writer and has written hundreds of essays for both traditional academic and on-line magazines among which Metanexus and Ovi. One of his current works in progress is a book dealing with the issue of cultural identity within the phenomenon of “the neo-immigrant” exhibited by an international global economy strong on positivism and utilitarianism and weak on humanism and ideals.

T
here has appeared lately a veritable plethora of books examining the present US-Russia relationship in the light of the recent investigations into the Russia-Trump connections, the so called New Cold War.

T
aking a page from the Caligula record of deranged behavior and antics, President Trump, in the presence of press reporters, recently staged a scene worthy of such an august persona from the era of the Roman Empire. He had arrived to one of the impressive White House Halls for the signing of some executive orders which he then loves to proudly display to the press, not unlike a three year old displaying his ability to write.

U
nless agreement on a new spending bill is finally reached a government shutdown is all but assured. It began when House Speaker Paul Ryan broadcasted an interview with CBS where he expressed concerns that the failure of the repeal of the Affordable Care Act might drive Trump into compromise with the Democrats in attempting to change Obamacare.

T
ransitioning from CEO to President has not been easy for Trump. That is because he is still under the illusion that it is just as easy to be one as to be the other.

A
new book by the Yale University Press has just been published. Its title is The End of Europe: Dictators, Demagogues, and the Coming Dark Age. The author is James Kirchick, a Yale University alumnus, journalist and foreign correspondent, recipient of the Journalist of the Year Award, conservative leaning politically, who however supported Hillary Clinton in the 2016 presidential elections branding Donald Trump as a “brashly authoritarian populist.”

F
ranklyn D. Roosevelt managed to reshape the US government’s role in the first 100 days of his presidency. Since then, the first 100 days have been the benchmark for the total presidential performance. Following that precedent, there is no other recent US president that has shown such dismal and shameless ignorance about governing as the White House’s current occupant. He mistakes business deals for governing.

T
he latest attempt to obstruct justice and to damage the inquiry of Congress by the White House is the blocking of former acting attorney general Sally Yates from testifying to Congress in the House investigation of links between Russian officials and Donald Trump’s presidential campaign.

W
hile ongoing probes about the involvement of his associates with Russian officials during the presidential campaign continue to sound alarms, Donald Trump, true to form, attempted, once again, to create distractions by forwarding a series of misleading tweets.

S
en. Lindsey Graham, Rep. South Carolina, has dubbed the relationship of President Trump to the US spy agencies to a Dr. Clouseau investigating himself. He is probably on to something considering the various bungling self-defeating and incompetent ways by which the House has so far been conducting the Russia dealings investigation.

D
uring his presidential campaign in 2016 Trump promised a 3 to 4 percent  economic growth to be accomplished through steep corporate and individual tax cuts and spending on the country’s infrastructure, i.e., constructions such as roads, airports, and tunnels.

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