Emanuel L. Paparella, Ph.D.

Emanuel L. Paparella, Ph.D.

Professor Paparella has earned a Ph.D. in Italian Humanism, with a dissertation on the philosopher of history Giambattista Vico, from Yale University. He is a scholar interested in current relevant philosophical, political and cultural issues; the author of numerous essays and books on the EU cultural identity among which A New Europe in search of its Soul, and Europa: An Idea and a Journey. Presently he teaches philosophy and humanities at Barry University, Miami, Florida. He is a prolific writer and has written hundreds of essays for both traditional academic and on-line magazines among which Metanexus and Ovi. One of his current works in progress is a book dealing with the issue of cultural identity within the phenomenon of “the neo-immigrant” exhibited by an international global economy strong on positivism and utilitarianism and weak on humanism and ideals.

M
embers of the US Congress are holding “private conversations” about whether Donald Trump should be removed from office. The New Yorker has published a lengthy analysis of the two ways he could be removed from office: either through impeachment by Congress or via the 25th Amendment to the US Constitution, which allows for a president to be removed if he is considered to be mentally unfit.

F
amed journalist George F. Will has recently levelled a devastating critique of Trump’s intellectual abilities. He has charged that the current president cannot think or speak clearly and he has called this flaw not a mere disinclination due to intellectual sloth, but a veritable disability due to an untrained mind syntactically challenged and bereft of information coupled with a narcissistic self-confidence.

A
fter the sacking of FBI Director James Comey, given that the suspicion among many observers is that it was precipitated by the Trump-Russia connection, the question arises: what’s next for the troubled US-Russia relationship?

O
f course there is nothing wrong to do business with Russia sub-committee chair Sen. Lindsey Graham has declared at a hearing on May 8th. The problem is that Trump has always adamantly denied it. On January 11 2017 Trump tweeted that "Russia has never tried to use leverage over me, I HAVE NOTHING TO DO WITH RUSSIA — NO DEALS, NO LOANS, NO NOTHING!"

A
fter 100 days of Trump presidency the question arises: has it begun to undermine some fundamental norms of American democracy and tradition?

D
onald Trump is unlikely to finish his first term as President, according to the leading Democrat on the committee, Senator Mark Warner, looking into alleged Russian interference in the US election, and former Labor Secretary Robert Reich. They put the odds at two to one.

J
ust as with an eight year old juvenile, any excuse is good to shift the blame. The latest antic by president Trump is that he has blamed the US constitution for the problems of his first 100 days in office. He has directly called the system of checks and balances on power to prevent abuses, “archaic.”

F
reelance journalist Mike Cernovich and Cassandra Fairbanks, a reporter for Russian news outlet Sputnik, posed for a picture behind the podium in the White House briefing room where they can be seen making a hand sign that can be used to signify “white power.” The Anti-Defamation League (ADL) has characterizes the symbol as a “racist hand sign.”

R
eaders who may have been following my daily column The Caligula Presidency, will have noticed that it is meant as a satire of sorts, tinged with humor, an attempt of last resort, so to speak, to place some rationale in a confusing and dangerous political situation.

A
recent new Gallup poll strongly suggests that an increasing number of Americans just don’t believe Trump’s spin about his presidency anymore. It finds that only 45 percent of Americans think Trump keeps his promises, down from 62 percent in February, an astonishing slide of 17 points:

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