Emanuel L. Paparella, Ph.D.

Emanuel L. Paparella, Ph.D.

Professor Paparella has earned a Ph.D. in Italian Humanism, with a dissertation on the philosopher of history Giambattista Vico, from Yale University. He is a scholar interested in current relevant philosophical, political and cultural issues; the author of numerous essays and books on the EU cultural identity among which A New Europe in search of its Soul, and Europa: An Idea and a Journey. Presently he teaches philosophy and humanities at Barry University, Miami, Florida. He is a prolific writer and has written hundreds of essays for both traditional academic and on-line magazines among which Metanexus and Ovi. One of his current works in progress is a book dealing with the issue of cultural identity within the phenomenon of “the neo-immigrant” exhibited by an international global economy strong on positivism and utilitarianism and weak on humanism and ideals.

A
strange phenomenon is observable lately among experts on Russia-US relations. There is a trend to explain the various thorny intricacies of such a relationship merely via economic strategies and formulas.

T
he FBI is has corroborated, and is now using the dossier that details Donald Trump’s ties to Russia. The dossier is a collection of memos gathered by intelligence operative Christopher Steele who spent 20 years spying for MI6 in Moscow.

L
ast February Trump posted a tweet praising Fox & Friends while blasting CNN and MSNBC. Then a few days later he held a conference where he lauded the honorable people who work for Fox News and added that “They hit me also when I do something wrong, but they have the most honest morning show, that’s all I can say. It’s the most honest.”

T
here is little one can count on Donald Trump when it comes to coherence, but one can always count on one thing: he will avoid personal responsibility for anything that goes wrong and blame a chosen scapegoat. It’s the way of all narcissists.

I
t has become rather obvious in the last couple of months that Sean Spicer’s job as Press Secretary is to pick up after his boss, especially when, within a short week he announces various major shifts in policy.

D
onald Trump is doubling down on the unsubstantiated wiretapping claims against his predecessor as well as his unproven allegation that former national security adviser Susan Rice may have committed a crime.

T
he alt-right is a movement which equates American greatness with preserving white Protestant culture. In that sense it is an ethnic movement which emphasizes its own culture at the expense of other cultures.

N
o coherent long range foreign policy seems to be discernible in the White House so far. What one hears are plenty of bosterous threats and dire warnings. It seems that for this administration the use of force is a policy in itself.

“… there is nothing either good or bad, but thinking makes it so.”--William Shakespeare

L
ately, in the world of intelligence and geopolitics, there is much talk about triangulation, what used to go by the name of Finlandization, now considered an obscene word in the world of diplomacy. “Velvet occupation” seems to be preferred.

I
f one surveys Putin’s official pronouncements of the last few years on Russia’s historical role in the 21st century, one may soon notice that the language of ideological fanaticism, so prevalent during the Soviet era, has slowly evolved in that of values, character, spiritual identity, tradition and historical heritage.

Page 1 of 22

ABOUT MD

Modern Diplomacy is an invaluable platform for assessing and evaluating complex international issues that are often outside the boundaries of mainstream Western media and academia. We provide impartial and unbiased qualitative analysis in the form of political commentary, policy inquiry, in-depth interviews, special reports, and commissioned research.

 

MD Newsletter

 
Top