Masahiro Matsumura

Masahiro MATSUMURA, Ph.D.

Professor of International Politics and National Security

Faculty of Law

St. Andrew's University (Momoyama Gakuin Daigaku)

With a chain of resignations and dismissals of ranking White House staff, this summer has got particularly hot for Washington watchers. Overall, the reshuffle manifested an irreconcilable internal discord over basic policy lines as well as personality conflicts. e U.S. mainstream media cast a serious doubt about the presidency’s viability, with a major focus on Trump’s competence to control and lead his top aides and staffs.

Facing the waning Pax Americana and the specter of a Pax Sinica, Japan will be at the crossroads of redefining its role in world politics, perhaps in the next decade. The status quo appears sufficiently stable, at least for a foreseeable future, under the barely sustained U.S. hegemony with which Japan is anchored through bilateral alliance.

Even though sharing strong democratic values and strategic interests, Japan and its immediate neighbor, South Korea, have recently estranged themselves each other.

Top