In the Middle East, a new stormy confrontation may emerge. After the ISIS militants’ defeat and the beginning of a political settlement in Syria, old confrontations within the Muslim world can cause a new explosion of tension and violence.

Published in Middle East

The Jerusalem story is the centerpiece of news this week.  Donald Trump and Mike Pence, an evangelical, in favor of moving the embassy and Rex Tillerson and John Mattis opposed in their discussion prior to the announcement.  That State and Defense departments both found the move detrimental to U.S. interests underlines how politics trump sound policy.

Published in Middle East

A recent government surrender to militant demands for stricter adherence to Islam mediated by the military coupled with the release from house arrest of a militant leader designated by the United Nations and the United States as a terrorist sets the stage for a confrontation between Pakistan and the Trump administration.

Published in South Asia

US President Donald J. Trump has let a genie out of the bottle with his recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital and intent to move the US embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem.

Published in Middle East

A multi-domed, sand-coloured, architectural marvel, Doha’s biggest and national mosque, symbolizes Qatar’s complex and troubled relationship with Saudi Arabia. Its naming six years ago after an eighteenth century Islamic scholar, Mohammed Ibn Abdul Wahhab, the founder of one of Islam’s most puritan strands, raised eyebrows, sparked controversy, and has since become an episode in the latest Gulf crisis.

Published in Middle East

Top officials from across the United Nations system called on Saturday for the Saudi-led coalition to fully lift its blockade of Yemen's Red Sea ports, warning that unless commercial imports are resumed, “the threat of widespread famine in a matter of months is very real.”

Published in Middle East

United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres has called on the parties to the conflict in Yemen to cease all air and ground assaults, expressing deep concern about the “sharp escalation” of armed clashes and airstrikes in the capital, Sana'a, and other parts of the war-torn country over the past several days.

Published in Newsdesk

Egyptian general-turned-president Abdul Fattah Al-Sisi would likely be the first to admit that an iron fist is no guarantee for retaining power. Not because of the fate of the country’s longest ruling autocrat, Hosni Mubarak, who was toppled in 2011 by a popular revolt.

Published in Middle East
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