Blaming your nation’s woes on George Soros is becoming something of a cottage industry in Central and Eastern Europe. In recent weeks, both the Hungarian and Romanian governments have ramped up their anti-Soros rhetoric in an attempt to deflect from their own failings. Such a tactic, however, can only last so long.

Published in Eastern Europe

In less than a year time Mexico will have its presidential election and the country may well elect leftist Andrés Manuel López Obrador (AMLO) as its new president. AMLO faces a weakened ruling party and a deeply divided National Action Party (PAN).

Published in Americas

Populism leaves its supporters spellbound, but it’s not sustainable. It’s a powerful explosive charge that sends taboo and politically incorrect, yet critical, subjects flying on to the discussion table. But politics and governance need the persistent drive of a steadily running engine with a set direction to achieve the promised goals.

Published in Europe

Throughout the most of human evolution both progress as well as its horizontal transmission was extremely slow, occasional and tedious a process. Well into the classic period of Alexander the Macedonian and his glorious Alexandrian library, the speed of our knowledge transfers – however moderate, analogue and conservative – was still always surpassing snaillike cycles of our breakthroughs. When our sporadic breakthroughs finally turned to be faster than the velocity of their infrequent transmissions – that very event marked a point of our departure.

Published in Economy
S
ince the election victory of Donald Trump, many have tirelessly talked about populism. It is not a first appearance. This phenomenon has been recently experienced in Latin America, it has also been the spirit of the interwar period of fascism in Europe and it has happened in Russia in 1917. In fact, it has happened many times, in many different places.

Published in Americas
J
acksonian school of thought is winning today in U.S. The starkest indicator of that is that the President of the U.S. is Donald Trump. As opposed to other three major schools (Wilsonian, Hamiltonian and Jeffersonian) Jacksonians are in the vanguard of American populism and promote isolationism in the global affairs of the U.S. The problem with that lies in the fact that after more than seven decades of U.S. foreign policy shaped by the Wilsonian and Hamiltonian schools of thought, sudden withdrawal to isolationism may bring the undesired result to Jacksonians -- war.

Published in Americas

Hitler didn’t steal power, his people voted for him, and then he destroyed his people… Crisis provokes fear…that is the risk. In times of crisis we lack judgment.”–Pope Francis

R
ecently Pope Francis has drawn a startling parallel between the rise of populism on both sides of the Atlantic, with its leaders promising a restoration of national identity and wholeness (e.g., Le Pen or Trump), and the rise of the Nazis some 80 years ago.

Published in Americas
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