O
n March 24 last, al-Sarraj dissolved his Petroleum Ministry and formally acquired direct control over the National Oil Company (NOC), namely the single Libyan oil company. Pending the very fierce civil war following the ousting of Gaddafi and his regime, NOC had remained substantially impartial and, despite the net decrease in oil extraction, it had managed to ensure part of proceeds to all the parties involved.

Published in Middle East

A
re we sure we have so far well-interpreted Libya’s scenario, its strategic balances and the nature of our real interests in that complex system? Are we confident that the goal of a mature foreign policy is to be deceived by the first who comes by, when he babbles words he does not know, such as "democracy" and "freedom"?

Published in Middle East

A
few days ago the press reported that dozens of Russian military "contractors", supplied by the RSB Group, were already operating in Eastern Libya to remove mines from the areas around Benghazi, in a region recently freed from jihadists by the armed forces of Khalifa Haftar, who ever more seems to be the pivot of Russian geopolitics in Libya. These reports run by the press are of great strategic relevance.

Published in Russia

T
he war in Syria against Assad’s Alawites and his post-Baathist State began with the people’s uprising of March-April 2011. Mass demonstrations in the traditional Sunni areas of Hama and Homs, to which the pro-government organizations responded with rallies supporting Bashar al-Assad and his regime.

Published in Middle East

W
ith the election of Donald Trump as the 45th President of the United States the possible approach of the new administration to international criminal justice and anti-impunity initiatives would be watched very keenly. Trump’s victory has brought back memories of George W. Bush’s presidency, which was characterized by a general contempt towards international criminal law and its only permanent institution, the International Criminal Court (ICC).

Published in International Law

A
bright conversation about the Italian role in Libya, the future of NATO and the Italian Air Force operativity with Gen. (ret.) Leonardo Tricarico, former head of the Italian Air Force, former Deputy Commander of the Multinational Coalition Force in the Balkans and former military advisor of three Italian Prime Ministers (1999-2004)

Published in Defense

L
ibya is planning to double its crude oil production next year. Although it has been an OPEC member since 1962, as well as the African country with the largest (and best quality) oil reserves, for obvious geopolitical reasons it has not been involved in the recent agreement between OPEC and non-OPEC countries, which favours the Russian Federation, reconnects Russia to Saudi Arabia, thus avoiding too close a link between Russia and Iran, and make Russia play a primary broker’s role in the Middle East.

Published in Middle East

T
he agreement between the Libyan factions signed in Morocco on December 17, 2015 has not been implemented yet. It implied an enlightened "process of national reconciliation" - obviously bottom-up - that no one wanted to put in place while bullets were whizzing and the self-styled "Caliphate" of Abu Bakr al Baghdadi established itself in the Sirte region.

Published in Middle East
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