How did members of opposition emerge as jihadist?

Often, the authorities of the Central Asian states fight against supporters of the so-called "Islamic states" by using the actions of their political opponents to prosecute their family members. In particular, under the slogan of combating Islamic extremism Tajik President Emomali Rakhmon has been repressing the leaders of Islamic Revolutionary Party of Tajikistan (IRPT) and their family more than two years.

Published in Central Asia

In Kyrgyzstan, the adjudication concerning the people involved in an act of terrorism in Embassy of China in Bishkek was pronounced. It is known that on August 30, 2016 the suicide bomber rammed the gates of Chinese Embassy in Kyrgyzstan by car and detonated a bomb together with the car in the territory of diplomatic mission. As a result of explosion, the terrorist died, three employees of embassy were wounded and serious damage was caused to the building of the consulate.

Published in Intelligence

C
hechen female terrorists are commonly known as Black Widows, there is a particular reason behind this title because they have usually lost their husbands, brothers or close relatives in one of the two Chechen wars that Russia fought against Islamist rebels since 1994.

Published in Terrorism

T
he well-known journalist, Seymour Hersch, has published an article in the German newspaper Die Welt refuting President Trump's assertions blaming the Syrians for the chemical incident at Khan Shaykhun on April 4th.  Worse, it accuses him of ignoring the intelligence that supported the Syrian and Russian version of events.  Mr. Hersch's source(s)?  Senior U.S. intelligence operatives.

Published in Americas

A
mong the nine military bases currently used by the Russian Federation, so far the only one in Syria is Tartus, a naval facility classified by Russia as a "technical and material support point", operating since 1971 thanks to an agreement with Hafez al-Assad’s Baathist Syria. The Humaynim air base, however, is Syrian and, in any case, Russian aircraft and sensors are stationed there.

Published in Middle East

R
ahmatullah Nabil, an Afghan politician, recently penned a politically motivated article “The world must secure Pakistan’s nuclear weapons” and exposed the biased journalistic platform, “New York Times.” Nabil’s opinion has transmitted negative narrative about Pakistani nuclear weapon and pleaded international community to get control over them. He used substandard arguments to strengthen inference of nuclear weapons’ insecurity in Pakistan.

Published in South Asia

Authors: Anne Speckhard, Ph.D. & Ardian Shajkovci, Ph.D.

D
uring the 2016 campaign and in the early months of his presidency, President Trump made “defeating radical Islamic terrorism” a key part of his counterterrorism strategy. He also pledged to intensify operations against terrorist groups like ISIS/Daesh and al-Qaeda as well as refrain from large-scale military interventions that could put the lives of American soldiers in harm’s way.

Published in Terrorism

T
he tension between the United States and North Korea is still mounting. In fact, in mid-May, some North Korean executives accused the US intelligence services of having made an attempt on Kim Jong-un's life. Allegedly the operation started with CIA selecting a North Korean citizen, who had already had contacts with the South Korean intelligence services, and who had to use highly poisonous chemical substances against the North Korean leader.

Published in East Asia
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