Authors: Wang Li, Sun Fangfang*

For a long time, the leaders of the Communist countries including China have been described as the technocrats with little creativity and fully-ideological orientated. But Kissinger has opined the past Chinese leaders Mao Zedong, Deng Xiaoping and current President Xi Jin-ping and his generation quite differently.

Published in East Asia

According to the United Nations, there are three times more internal migrants than international migrants in the world. However, these migrants command much less attention in political debate and planning processes than international migrants.

Published in Economy

Potential Qatari moves to become the first Gulf state to effectively abolish the region’s onerous kafala or labour sponsorship system, denounced as a form of modern slavery, could produce a rare World Cup that leaves a true legacy of social and economic change.

Published in Middle East

The Commission is today presenting a new strategy for the outermost regions, those nine regions located thousands of kilometres from continental Europe, to help them fulfil their full potential.

Published in Newsdesk

Fiji has become the first emerging market to issue a sovereign green bond, raising 100 million Fijian dollars, or US$50 million, to support climate change mitigation and adaption.

Published in Newsdesk

The social status of one’s parents is as influential today as it was 50 years ago in determining a person’s future, according to early findings from an upcoming World Bank report, Fair Progress? Educational Mobility Around the World.

Published in Newsdesk

When, in 1972, Nixon pointed out to Mao Zedong that "the Chinese President changed the world", Mao just answered "no, only something on the outskirts of Beijing." In the mind of the Chinese President, a Taoist poet, that was the sense of the natural centrality of the "Middle Empire" compared to the First World (the United States and the USSR, namely "the barbarians of the North"), to the Second World (namely the  servants of either power) and to the Third World, the region that was bound to be represented and dominated by China.

Published in East Asia

China and Madagascar have a very long-term relationship. Their connection finds its way back in history. A silky road has already tied the two countries centuries ago. Indeed, from the 13th and 14th centuries, in the Yuan dynasty, China already had three routes to Africa, one of them includes Madagascar.

Published in East Asia
Page 7 of 120
Top