T
he Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan could soon find himself with a raft of sweeping powers as his party pushes for a far-reaching law with limited checks and balances that would transform the current parliamentary system of Turkey into a presidential one. Last January 21, a number of constitutional amendments seeking to expand the powers of Turkey’s president won the support of 339 deputies in a parliament composed of 550 members.

Published in Middle East

T
here are numerous think tanks, non-governmental organizations, and philanthropic institutions diligently and impressively working all around the globe today to bring us knowledge and data sets about the state of the world’s countries across a host of important life indexes. While their work is obviously inspired to bring attention to and ultimately alleviate some of the world’s worst crises and suffering, this article wants to use the same extensive data sets to bring to light the bottom of the barrel, so to speak: to highlight what are unfortunately the worst places on earth to be accidentally born into.

Published in Iconoclast

I
t did not take very long before ancient Romans began to realize that the Caligula reign (which lasted some five years) represented a veritable threat to the Roman Republic and indeed the whole of the Roman Empire.

Published in Americas

D
o you want the blue pill or the red pill?” Since the election, social media has exploded with a special type of visceral hate by people on both sides of the political spectrum. While the situation appears to be worsening with each president, this post-election devolution is of special note.

Published in Americas

Eternal Vigilance is the Price of Freedom” --Thomas Jefferson “And at the end they go crazy”   --Giambattista Vico

J
ohn Adams, the second president of the United States, did a study on the life of Republics from their inception all the way to the 18th century. To his great surprise, he discovered that they all died, sooner or later. In other words, they were mortal. The ones who lasted longer were what he calls “republics of virtue.”

Published in Americas

P
resident Trump’s first address to Congress lasted about an hour. He must have uttered some 5000 words, but not even one of those words was Russia. Not one minute was devoted to the successful enterprise of one of the main adversaries of democracy and stability in the world to undermine American democracy. The bear was there in the room, all right, but somehow nobody could see it.

Published in Americas

W
hen I was in college in the 60s I took a required course in American Government. It had chapters on Federalism, the Constitution, Checks and Balances, the Three Equal Branches of Government, the demarcation, separation and balancing of power.

Published in Americas

F
or a very long time Intelligence Studies has been dominated by analysis of the Five Eyes community, which is comprised of the United States, Great Britain, Australia, New Zealand, and Canada. In reality, that study is more often the study of intelligence in the US and UK. While not entirely fair to characterize this as Western prejudice - access to data is better in these two countries and intelligence scholars and analysts for the most part do not fear retribution or reprisal – more voices need to come forward to consider intelligence and its role on societies beyond the Five Eyes.

Published in Africa
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